Feb 272018
 
 February 27, 2018  Posted by  Tagged with:
Join Durham Mayor Steve Schewel to talk about how Duke and Durham are intertwined and the role of students as members of the larger Durham community. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

In 1983, Steve Schewel founded the Durham-based Independent newspaper. The weekly paper has won some of the most prestigious awards in American journalism, including the George Polk Award for environmental reporting, the Investigative Reporters and Editors national award, the H.L. Mencken Writing Award, and the Thurgood Marshall Award. Schewel published the paper for 30 years before selling it in 2012.

From 2004-2008, Schewel served on the Durham Public Schools’ Board of Education, including two years as vice-chair. He was elected to the Durham City Council in 2011 with special interest in affordable housing, public safety and parks and trails. A former English teacher and community organizer, Schewel serves on a number of boards in the local community. He coached youth soccer in Durham for 18 years.

Steve Schewel graduated magna cum laude from Duke in 1973. He earned a master’s in English from Columbia University in 1974 and a Ph.D. in education from Duke in 1982.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Snacks are available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: DoLunch with Steve Schewel
WHEN: Monday, March 26, from 12pm to 1:30pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Feb 022018
 
 February 2, 2018  Posted by  Tagged with:


How do we tell our history? Whose voices are heard? What role does politics play? Join New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu for snacks and discussion to get a different and involved perspective!

Mitch Landrieu was sworn in as the 61st Mayor of New Orleans on May 3, 2010, with a clear mandate to turn the city around following the devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the BP Oil Spill. On February 1, 2014, Mayor Landrieu was overwhelmingly re-elected to a second term and is continuing to deliver major victories. Prior to serving as Mayor, Landrieu served as Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana for six years and as a State legislator for 16 years where he earned a reputation as a reformer. Throughout his years of public service, Mitch has governed by the philosophy that New Orleans is “one team, one fight, one voice, and one city.”

Mayor Landrieu is the 2018 Kenan Distinguished Lecturer, whose talk, “Making Straight What Has Been Crooked: The Ethics and Politics of Race in America,” will take place at 7pm on March 2, at the Durham Armory.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Snacks are available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Snacks with Mitch Landrieu
WHEN: Friday, March 2, from 4pm to 5pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Aug 162017
 
 August 16, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

What is Good Art?The Kenan Institute for Ethics invites students from across Duke to submit artwork to this year’s “What Is Good Art?” exhibition to explore how we should live, the role that art plays in our lives and its impact on how we see the world.

The theme for What Is Good Art? 2017-2018 is Community. As always, the WIGA theme is intentionally broad and open to many interpretations.

All Duke University students are encouraged to submit entries to compete for four prizes, and have their work displayed in a collective exhibition in the Keohane Kenan Gallery of the West Duke Building. A distinguished panel of experts in art and/or ethics convene to select pieces for display. All Duke students are invited to submit works in any medium for the contest and exhibition around the theme of “Community.” Submission deadline is April 8, 2018 at 7:59pm.

What Is Good Art? is sponsored by Team Kenan, the student branch of the Kenan Institute for Ethics. Submission guidelines, information about the prizes, and more can be found on the exhibition website.

Oct 242016
 
 October 24, 2016  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

IntersectionalityI am an intersectional feminist. I remember quite fondly the first time I used the phrase to describe myself during a conversation with my mom on a car ride home. She looked puzzled and seemed rather taken aback that I found it necessary to qualify my sense of feminism as “intersectional,” but to me, it’s more a necessity than a mere difference of semantics. Intersectionality is the concept that oppressive institutions, like racism, sexism, or homophobia, are all interconnected, tangled together and impossible to analyze separately.    

The past few weeks in America have been filled with more sadness, more killing of black men, and more pleading for the senseless violence to end.  As an African American woman trying to make sense of the heartache and the many more tears that have been shed for those we have lost, I think back to the black community I am apart of.

Racial identities aren’t chosen, and perhaps that is what makes the bond so unique. Darkened melanin creates a sense of understanding, a shared past, and at least a cursory understanding of what someone else may have experienced. But even within a marginalized community, I am frequently reminded of what it means to be a woman, a black woman.

Distinctly the two communities I most greatly identify with are my race and my gender, but I think the combination, or rather the intersection of the two, is where I constantly find myself belonging. From these communities I gain a sense of strength and understanding of how others’ experiences can be just like mine even when it feels as if I walk alone. Therefore, there is a greater sense of responsibility, an unwritten oath members of the community should take of mentorship and helping one another.

Such a philosophy seems idealistic at best- creating a perfect world where everyone lifts up each other with no consideration of themselves- but at times it’s the small things that contribute to an understanding of the shared community. Admiring in awe when I finally see an African American female in a position of authority at this institution or ensuring that I acknowledge the many black staff workers on campus with a smile, a quick conversation, and thanking them graciously for their work.

There has not been a time that I find my membership in this intersectional community a burden, but there have been times where I find myself more tired that I would care to admit: the micro-aggression from a classmate, looking around the classroom and seeing that yet again you are the only woman of color, feeling like a show animal when someone wants to touch your twists and then quickly being reminded of the angry black woman stereotype as you firmly remind them to take their hands off of you, or having to gauge how loud you can be in an impassioned class debate. Being black, being a black woman, is not problematic, rather it is how others treat this community that remains problematic.

I say again: I am an intersectional feminist, meaning that I understand the strife that comes with being a member of a marginalized race and gender, but I also firmly believe that my membership within such a community grants me a beautiful and unique perspective on life.