Mar 282017
 
 March 28, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with:

In an era of increasingly vitriolic rhetoric and tribal political identities, is there room for politeness in politics? Join Leslie Winner and John Hood for lunch to discuss these issues and more.

John Hood is chairman of the board at the John Locke Foundation, a North Carolina think tank that issues reports, hosts events, produces broadcast programs, and publishes Carolina Journal. Hood helped found the John Locke Foundation in 1989 and served as its president from 1995 to 2014. Hood writes and comments frequently for national media outlets, particularly National Review and its blog “The Corner.” His articles have appeared in both magazines — such as Readers’ Digest, The New Republic, Military History, and Reason — and in newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The Chicago Tribune.

Leslie J. Winner is a North Carolina attorney and the former executive director of the Winston-Salem-based Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation. Previously, Winner worked as a public-interest lawyer in private practice, as well as general counsel to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education and as vice president and general counsel to the University of North Carolina. She was elected to three terms in the N.C. Senate, serving as Senate majority whip.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Leslie Winner and John Hood
WHEN: Wednesday, April 5, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Sep 022016
 
 September 2, 2016  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

Jerry EnsmingerHow do we persevere in the struggle for environmental protection, when faced with claims that national security interests trump regulations? What is the duty of government and/or industry to safeguard local communities and the global environment? And if institutions and corporations fail to serve as effective stewards, how do we hold them to account before lasting damage is done? Join Jerry Ensminger, for lunch to discuss these topics and more.

Jerry Ensminger is a retired Marine Master Sergeant of 24 years. His family is one of hundreds of thousands who bathed, drank, and cooked with water contaminated with cancer-causing chemicals at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, in eastern North Carolina. He lost his nine year old daughter, Janey, to leukemia in 1985. Jerry has dedicated his life to helping other victims of the contamination at Camp Lejeune. In 2012, President Obama signed into law the Janey Ensminger Act, authorizing medical care to military and family members who had resided at the base between 1957 and 1987 and developed conditions linked to the water contamination.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Jerry Ensminger
WHEN: Thursday, March 2, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Aug 282016
 
 August 28, 2016  Posted by

Tens of thousands of undocumented youth, have voluntarily returned to or been deported to Mexico after having grown up in the United States. What are the challenges, obstacles, injustices, triumphs, and potential of this bilingual, bicultural generation on the move? Join Jill Anderson, co author of Los Otros Dreamers, and two of the ‘dreamers,’ Claudia A. Amaro and Maggie Loredo, for lunch to discuss these issues and more.

Jill Anderson was born in Utah, grew up in Texas, and has been living in Mexico City since 2007. She has a PhD in English with a specialization in U.S. American and Mexican-American literatures from the University of Texas in Austin. There, she also taught writing and rhetoric courses and collaborated with the Worker’s Defense Project on behalf of immigrant labor rights. In Mexico City, she served as Co-Director of the Casa de los Amigos, a Quaker guesthouse and center for peace and international understanding. In 2012, she began research with returning and deported young adults with the support of a postdoctoral fellowship at the Universidad Autónoma Nacional de México. Her research with young people working in call centers in Mexico City inspired her to work even more closely as a researcher-activist within the transnational movement for the human rights of (im)migrants in the Americas. Jill is co-author, with photographer Nin Solis, of Los Otros Dreamers (2014), and author of articles published by Latino Studies, Norteamérica, Wilson Center-Mexico Institute, and others. Currently she is the director of the non-profit, Otros Dreams en Acción (ODA), which is dedicated to advocacy, support, and empowerment of deported and returning immigrant youth in Mexico.

Claudia A. Amaro was born in Tijuana, Mexico and moved to the US at age 12 in 1988 after her father was murdered. In 2006 her husband was deported and Claudia decided to move back to Mexico with him and their son. In 2013, Claudia joined the #Dream9 and participated in a historic act of civil disobedience, returning home to Kansas City in the process. Claudia has studied journalism and industrial engineering, and she is certified as a teacher by the Department of Education in Mexico and Cambridge University. She is an active member of her community and supports Otros Dreams en Acción (ODA) as a liaison in the US. She is proud to be Mexican, and considers herself as a citizen of the world.

Maggie Loredo was born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico and migrated with her parents to the US at age 3. She spent her early childhood in Dallas, TX and at the age of 10 moved with her family to Georgia. Maggie finished high school in Whitfield County, GA in May 2008. After her attempts to enroll in college in the US failed, at age 18 she returned to the country of her birth. Maggie has lived in Mexico for 8 years and currently resides in the city of San Luis Potosi. She studied business administration with a specialization in tourism and is a budding photographer. Maggie has become certified to teach English and works as an interpreter. She is featured in the book Los Otros Dreamers, and together with Jill Anderson is co-founder of Otros Dreams en Acción (ODA).

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Jill Anderson, Claudia Amaro and Maggie Loredo
WHEN: Tuesday, February 28, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Aug 212016
 
 August 21, 2016  Posted by  Tagged with:

Richard Cohen

How does society combat the apparent rise of incidents of bigotry, hate crimes and racial supremacist groups? Should democratic governments, which by their very nature, serve the majority, protect minority groups and non citizens? Has the United States learned anything from the ongoing struggle for Civil Rights? Join Richard Cohen, President of the Southern Poverty Law Center, for lunch to discuss these topics and more.

Richard Cohen came to the SPLC in 1986 as its legal director after practicing law in Washington, D.C., for seven years. Under Cohen’s guidance, the SPLC won a series of landmark lawsuits against some of the nation’s most violent white supremacist organizations. He also successfully litigated a wide variety of important civil rights actions – defending the rights of prisoners to be treated humanely, working for equal educational opportunities for all children, and bringing down the Confederate battle flag from the Alabama State Capitol. Prior to becoming SPLC president in 2003, Cohen served as its vice president for programs, which include the Intelligence Project and Teaching Tolerance.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Richard Cohen
WHEN: Tuesday, February 21, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Aug 102016
 
 August 10, 2016  Posted by

Banner [Recovered] copy 2-02On behalf of Team Kenan, we are excited to announce the release of the Winter edition of our magazine, Encompass! To commemorate the occasion, the Kenan Institute will be hosting a reception on February 10, 2017 from 4-5:30 p.m. in the Keohane-Kenan Gallery (in the West Duke building on East Campus). We are delighted to invite you to join us in celebrating the completion of the magazine. Refreshments will be provided and remarks will be made at 5 p.m.

The edition explores a variety of perspectives from students and professors, ranging from difficult choices in end-of-life healthcare to one reporter’s experience covering war in Africa. Other features include an analysis of effective charitable action, a call for humanity-grounded policymaking, and a history of women at Duke.

 

Aug 062016
 
 August 6, 2016  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

DoLunchJamieKalven-400Does power inevitably corrupt and is today’s media interested in, or even able to hold those in power accountable? How can members of society charged with upholding “law and order” succumb to systematic corruption and what effect does that have on our neighborhoods? How do we rethink American law enforcement so that it, once again, “serves and protects” communities, rather than taking a combative approach that institutionalizes violence?  Join investigative journalist and human rights activist Jamie Kalven for lunch to discuss these topics and more.

Kalven is co-founder and of the Invisible Institute, a “journalistic production company on the South Side of Chicago”, which is “dedicated to enhancing the capacity of citizens to hold public institutions accountable.” He has reported widely on public housing and police abuse issues for The View From The Ground. Kalven’s reporting on patterns of police abuse at Stateway Gardens in 2005-2006 gave rise to a federal civil rights suit – Bond v. Utreras – that figured centrally in public debate over police reform in Chicago. Kalven’s investigation and subsequent reporting brought to light the 2014 shooting of teenager Laquan McDonald and the subsequent cover-up by the Chicago Police Department, which led directly to an investigation and findings of systematic civil rights violations by the U.S. Department of Justice.

Among the awards Kalven has received forms reporting are the 2015 Polk Award for Local Reporting and the 2016 Ridenhour Courage Prize.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Lunch will take place in West Duke 08C from 12pm to 1pm. Catered lunch will be available to students who RSVP – space is limited. 

WHAT: Do Lunch with Jamie Kalven
WHEN: Monday, February 6, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: West Duke 08C, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Apr 162016
 
 April 16, 2016  Posted by  Tagged with:

Chew On This - Mike WoodardCurious about the impacts of this election season on the state and local levels?

Join us for a talk with Democratic State Senator Mike Woodard, who currently serves District 22 of North Carolina. He was a member of the Durham City Council from 2005 to 2012 and has been a State Senator since 2013. Woodard has worked at Duke for 27 years, having spent 20 years as a business analyst in the financial services division with a focus on managing the University’s computer-based administrative systems. He has also worked in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and for Alumni Affairs.

Woodard’s constituency covers Durham, Caswell and Person counties, where local businesses have been affected by the HB2 law. As an outspoken opponent to the law, Woodard has authored a bill to repeal the legislation. He has also focused on the economy of NC, focusing on job opportunities and supporting small businesses.

Attendance is free, dinner will be served. Please RSVP to ensure a sufficient amount of food.

WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
WHEN: Wednesday, November 16, 6-8pm
RSVPhttps://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Gfbawn4NBw2scnwcsvKezPpxvQJAcY5lNE9tI9-mwpQ

Apr 152016
 
 April 15, 2016  Posted by

Do you wonder, in a city once home to “Black Wall Street,” how do we foster growth for minority and female entrepreneurs and innovators? Are you interested in broadening the opportunities afforded to innovative thinkers who don’t fit the traditional mold of the ‘typical American businessman?’ Join Adam Klein, chief strategist with the American Underground, who says that because of the lack of diversity in tech startups and investor groups and the social pressures of traditional gender roles “great business ideas aren’t getting the opportunity to come to market.” for lunch to discuss these topics and more.

Under Klein’s leadership, Google for Entrepreneurs designated The American Underground, a thriving campus for entrepreneurs in downtown Durham,. as one of only eight sites in the country to be part of its Tech Hub network. And at a time when cities are struggling to reinvent themselves, The American Underground has become a national model for how to transform a once-depressed downtown into a magnet for high-growth companies. In total, The American Underground is home to more than 240 startup companies across 120,000 square feet of space—three buildings in Durham and a location in Raleigh. By the end of this year, American Underground wants women and minority-led firms to make up more than 50% of its startups.

Klein holds a Master of Regional Planning with a specialization in economic development from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He and his wife, Manda, live in downtown Durham where he serves in his church, enjoys drinking local beer, and hiking and traveling. 

Lunch will take place in West Duke 107F from 12pm to 1pm. Catered lunch will be available to students who RSVP – space is limited. 

WHAT: Do Lunch with Adam Klein
WHEN: Tuesday, November 15, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: West Duke 107F, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Apr 042016
 
 April 4, 2016  Posted by

MonumentalMe_FWflyer5Become Duke’s newest monument – to yourself… and in so doing, reflect on how the environment of campus affects our culture.

There are a total of nine statues on Duke’s campuses. Eight are of white men.

What will our legacy be? Who will represent us? How would we want to portray ourselves with a vastly different demographic makeup on campus?

Become your own monument as #MonumentalMe returns to East Campus, this Family Weekend 2016!

Apr 032016
 
 April 3, 2016  Posted by

Curious about the role of religion and politics in the 2016 presidential election cycle? Interested in becoming a government speechwriter or political commentator? Join a lunchtime conversation with political commentator and former speechwriter Pete Wehner.

Wehner is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center who has served in the last three Republican administrations. In 2001, he was named deputy director of speechwriting for President George W. Bush. He later served as director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives, where he reached out to prominent thinkers and advised the White House on a range of domestic and international issues. A senior adviser to Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, he has been affiliated with several leading research organizations. He is a frequent commentator on television and radio and has written widely on political, cultural, religious and national security issues.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Peter Wehner
WHEN: Thursday, November 3, from 1pm to 2pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.