Nov 012017
 
 November 1, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with:

For most students, education-related debt is a fact of life. How does that reality weigh on the decisions students make? Come see recent Cornell graduate Hugo Genes’ provocative take on the ways choosing an elite university prepares students for the future, or doesn’t, on December 1 at 5:30pm, in White Lecture Hall on Duke’s East Campus.

A panel discussing the film and the questions it poses will follow immediately, in West Duke 101.

The panel will include:

  • Nikki Smith, Assistant Director, Career and Development Center, Nicholas School of the Environment
  • Carina Arellano, Duke University Admissions Officer
  • Adam Tomasiello, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Admissions at Duke University
  • John A Forlines III, Executive in Residence of Economics
  • Irene Jasper, Director of Student Lending and Personal Finance

The film, produced by recent Cornell graduate Hugo Genes, is a hybrid documentary, with dramatized elements, that explores the decision making process of college bound students when seeking potentially lucrative jobs in the finance sector, how the universities play upon those expectations, how financial institutions recruit heavily on Ivy League campuses and whether or not those students who choose that path are then well-prepared to pay off their college debt, when they graduate and whether or not they would be equally well served obtaining undergraduate degrees from less expensive options.

Oct 252017
 
 October 25, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

Join Slate magazine’s Critic-at-Large Stephen Metcalf to talk about how culture shapes society and vice-versa, how neoliberalism led to the Trump presidency and the role and responsibility of journalists in the age of Trump. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

Stephen Metcalf attended Phillips Exeter Academy but, “three weeks shy of graduation, was asked by the school administration, in no uncertain terms, to leave.” He then matriculated at Wesleyan University, later earning a master’s degree from the University of Virginia. After spending some time working on a Ph.D. in the English graduate program at Yale University, he moved to New York City where he worked as a speechwriter for Hillary Clinton, during her first Senate campaign, and a freelance writer. Subsequently, he joined Slate as a staff writer, where he writes the magazine’s Dilettante column and serves as host of the magazine’s culture podcast.

Metcalf’s work has appeared in The New York Times, the New York Observer and New York (magazine).

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Stephen Metcalf
WHEN: Tuesday, November 7, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Oct 252017
 
 October 25, 2017  Posted by

Darrin Zammit LupiJoin Malta-based photojournalist and humanitarian Darrin Zammit Lupi for lunch, to discuss the impact of documentary photography and media advocacy on behalf of vulnerable populations, notably migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

Darrin Zammit Lupi started his photography career with The Malta Independent in 1992, but decided to turn freelance shortly afterwards. After a year’s training with the National Council for the Training of Journalists in the UK, he undertook foreign assignments in Albania and war-torn former Yugoslavia, winning the BPC Award to Journalists 1993 for his Albanian work.  In recent years, he covered the South-East Asia tsunami tragedy, the refugee crisis during the war in Kosovo, issues related to the Millennium Development Goals (with a particular emphasis on HIV/AIDS) in various parts of Africa, the earthquake in L’Aquila, Italy, the war in Libya, the Costa Concordia disaster and several other national and international assignments.  His work for Reuters has been published in newspapers, magazines, books and online worldwide, and has featured in publications such as TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Sunday Times, The Guardian, Paris Match, Der Spiegel and others.

In late 2014, he published his book ‘Isle Landers’, covering a decade’s work on irregular immigration and asylum seekers in the Mediterranean.

He holds a Masters Degree with Distinction in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography from the University of the Arts, London.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Darrin Zammit Lupi
WHEN: Friday, November 3, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Sep 252017
 
 September 25, 2017  Posted by

Join Team Kenan as we mark the start of the 2017-2018 academic year, from 3-5pm on Friday, October 20, in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (West Duke 101) on Duke’s West Campus. Stop by to join the conversation on the TK Couch, for information on this year’s What Is Good Art? competition, to make your mark in our photobooth and for the chance to pick up one of our ‘real/fake major’ t-shirts. This event also marks the official launch of the Summer 2017 issue of Encompass, our student produced ethics magazine.

Team Kenan provokes the Duke undergraduate community to consider the notion that ethics is everywhere through fun, engaging and sometimes unconventional programs. Team Kenan is the social and intellectual bridge between those students already engaged by the Institute’s offerings and those that are not, serving as the core of a vibrant intellectual community of students, blurring the line between the study of ethics and its application throughout students’ lives.

Sep 182017
 
 September 18, 2017  Posted by

Join New Media Advocacy Project founder Adam Stofsky for lunch, to discuss how new media can be leveraged for human rights and social justice advocacy. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

Adam Stofsky is the founder and special advisor at New Media Advocacy Project. Adam is a graduate of Amherst College and Harvard Law School. After finishing law school, he served as a law clerk for the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and then received a Skadden Fellowship to work as a litigator at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. After his fellowship, he joined the law firm, Debevoise & Plimpton, as a litigation associate, where he worked for two years, after which he left to found N-Map. Adam experimented with using video to support legal advocacy during his first summer in law school, working for a small, local NGO in Nigeria, where he made a movie to pressure the government to stop obstructing litigation seeking a remedy for a massive forced eviction that had left 300,000 people homeless. The strategy was a success, and Adam continued his video and new media experiments at the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights. Working with hundreds of videographers around the country, Adam successfully used new media techniques to favorably settle race discrimination cases, pressure state legislatures to allocate money to low income communities after Hurricane Katrina, and document voting rights violations. Adam received an Echoing Green Fellowship to support N-Map in the spring of 2009.

 Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Adam Stofsky
WHEN: Friday, September 22, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Sep 072017
 
 September 7, 2017  Posted by

Libia PosadaHow does our journey through life, our hardships, our joys, our triumphs and our struggles affect our bodies? If those effects and the stories they tell to others are invisible, how do we make plain to see the way our challenges and traumas shape us and our communities? Join Colombian surgeon and artist Dr. Libia Posada for lunch, to discuss these questions and more.

Dr. Posada will visit Duke and Durham as part of a three-week Katz Family Fellowship to lead workshops and presentations with students, faculty and community members that deal with migration and trauma, and how she connects art and medicine. Posada will participate in the Franklin Humanities Institute’s Health Humanities Conference, “Breath, Body, Voice.” She will co-lead a workshop on her unique medical/artistic practice that links research, action, and creation with communities in Colombia and Durham. Her art exhibit and reception will be held 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16 at the Fredric Jameson Gallery at 115 Friedl Building on Duke’s East Campus.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Libia Posada
WHEN: Wednesday, September 13, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Aug 312017
 
 August 31, 2017  Posted by

Ben Ehrenreich writes across genres, having published two novels, a variety of essays, and now a major nonfiction work on Palestinian life in the West Bank. The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine has been called “A chillingly beautiful, albeit heartbreaking, chronicle of Palestinian life in the West Bank. It’s written with immense empathy, but is equally grounded, and urgently real” by Yasmine El Rashidi in The Guardian.

He will be at Duke for a public talk on the ethics of telling stories in contested terrain at 3:30. Get a chance to talk to talk with him in a more intimate setting over lunch.

RSVP here.

Apr 052017
 
 April 5, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with: ,

 

Pre-Consulting

Why did you choose your major? How passionate are you about your major? What are the stereotypes surrounding different majors? Are some majors are better than others?

Have you seen an inflatable couch somewhere on East Campus or the BC Plaza? Team Kenan members host TK Couch, a project that invites students to sit down and consider the notion that ethics is everywhere (we promise: it’s fun and we have candy.)

Couch topics change on a weekly basis and have included alien life and immigration policy, hookup culture and dating, good vs. bad music, importance of self-care, and the rush process, over the course of this year, sometimes with Duke faculty and senior administrators joining the conversation.

This week, we’re provoking conversations about why we choose the academic paths that we do, how that impacts Duke culture and whether or not we think that’s normal. To accomplish that, we’ve created four fake major shirts in the vein of those distributed by Duke academic departments.

  1. Pre-consulting – addresses the idea that students choose their major based on a potential for a lucrative career. Do you go to college to learn or for a job? To what extent does your major have to be incredibly profitable for your future?
  2. Disappointing my parents – do students feel pressure from their parents to pursue a specific major or to be a perfect student? Do we have an obligation to study what our parents want us to if they fund our education?
  3. Rejection – although there are countless opportunities at Duke, oftentimes it seems that the opportunities are very selective and not available to everyone. Is it worth it to apply to something when you know there’s a good chance you’ll get rejected? How does selectivity affect campus culture?
  4. Hookup Cultural Studies – addressing the topic of consent and the seemingly anti-relationship, pro-hookup culture on campus. How do you obtain consent? What makes hookup culture stigmatized? Why are you looking for a relationship?

We know — you’re wondering: how can I join this discussion and obtain one of these conversation-provoking shirts? It’s easy: have a seat and talk with Team Kenan (and guest coucher, Dean Valerie Ashby, on April 5, between 10:30am – 12:30pm, in the Brian Center plaza.

Mar 312017
 
 March 31, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with:

Khzir KhanCan a democracy single-out religious and ethnic groups for increased scrutiny in the name of security? Has the United States turned on its heels, from the promise of an inclusive community welcoming immigrants and visitors of all races, religions and creeds; was it ever that ideal? Should it be? Should a nation be governed by leaders strictly enamored with its foundational documents and what happens if their interpretation of those principles differs dramatically from those of their predecessors? Join Khizr Khan for lunch to discuss these questions and more.

Khizr Khan, a Muslim American Gold Star father, entered the national spotlight when he spoke at the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, in which Khan said that if Trump is able to follow through on his proposal to ban Muslims from entering the country, his late son never would have been able to come to serve the country in the military. Khan is a lawyer and holds degrees from Punjab University and Harvard Law School. His work, based in New York, deals with the fields of immigration and international business law and founded a pro bono project to provide legal services for the families of men and women serving in the military.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Khizr Khan
WHEN: Thursday, April 20, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Blue Parlor, East Duke Building, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Mar 282017
 
 March 28, 2017  Posted by  Tagged with:

In an era of increasingly vitriolic rhetoric and tribal political identities, is there room for politeness in politics? Join Leslie Winner and John Hood for lunch to discuss these issues and more.

John Hood is chairman of the board at the John Locke Foundation, a North Carolina think tank that issues reports, hosts events, produces broadcast programs, and publishes Carolina Journal. Hood helped found the John Locke Foundation in 1989 and served as its president from 1995 to 2014. Hood writes and comments frequently for national media outlets, particularly National Review and its blog “The Corner.” His articles have appeared in both magazines — such as Readers’ Digest, The New Republic, Military History, and Reason — and in newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The Chicago Tribune.

Leslie J. Winner is a North Carolina attorney and the former executive director of the Winston-Salem-based Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation. Previously, Winner worked as a public-interest lawyer in private practice, as well as general counsel to the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education and as vice president and general counsel to the University of North Carolina. She was elected to three terms in the N.C. Senate, serving as Senate majority whip.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Leslie Winner and John Hood
WHEN: Wednesday, April 5, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.