Jun 222017
 
 June 22, 2017  Tagged with: ,

Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, in collaboration with the Duke University Center for Jewish Studies, invites applications for graduate scholars for the academic year 2017-2018. The call is open to graduate and professional students, as well as postdocs, at Duke University wishing to take part in interdisciplinary student-led seminars, focusing on Religions and Public Life, with a special thematic focus on Minorities and Diasporas.

Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics explores the role of religions in historical and cultural context as they influence the lives of their adherents, interact with each other across time and geography, and contribute to the formation of institutions that make up the public sphere. A joint endeavor with Trinity College of Arts & Sciences and Duke Divinity School, it is an interdisciplinary platform that puts scholars, students, and practitioners in conversation with one another through collaborative research, innovative teaching, and community engagement.

The graduate scholars will have the opportunity to develop their research interests and discuss recent scholarship. Members take active part in the events of Religions and Public Life and commit to attending monthly meetings throughout the academic year. Graduate scholars also commit to writing a think-piece or blog post relating their research to contemporary issues, to be published on the Religions and Public Life website at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Graduate scholars will receive funding of up to $1,500 in reimbursements for research expenses.

To apply, please submit the materials listed below to Dr. Amber Pearson (amber.diaz@duke.edu) by July 14, 2017, with subject line: “Religions & Public Life graduate scholars.” Awards will be announced in mid-July. An application should include:

  • A curriculum vita.
  • A one-page abstract for a research project, describing how it connects to Religions and Public Life and the Minorities and Diasporas theme. Please include the topic, objectives of your project, and relevance to the discipline or field of study as well as your academic trajectory. Additionally, please include how your project may contribute to the scholarly community.
  • A research budget. Scholars may be asked to share their research and findings by participating in colloquia or panel discussions during the year of their fellowship or the following year.
May 292017
 
 May 29, 2017  Tagged with: ,

Undergraduate and graduate students invited to apply. Rolling application deadline during Spring 2017.

The Religions and Pubic Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, in collaboration with the Duke Center for Jewish Studies, is pleased to announce a summer short course, July 12-17, on religious exchange and historical collaboration among the three Abrahamic Religions at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. A competitive fellowship to attend is available, funded by the Center for Jewish Studies.

Download the syllabus and find application instructions here.

For any questions, contact Amber Díaz Pearson.

May 012017
 
 May 1, 2017  Tagged with:

Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics will host on Nov. 1 at 1:30p.m. a seminar with Daniel Jenkins, Presidential Visiting Fellow at Yale University. Dr. Jenkins’ talk, “Anti-Protestantism and Its Contemporary Legacy,” argues that many of today’s critiques of secularism, human rights, religious freedom, etc. assume an understanding of Protestantism that is difficult to square with its actual history.

A full abstract and the speaker’s bio is provided below.

For more information on the event, contact Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu.

1:30-3:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 1
Friedl 225
(East Campus)

Abstract: This paper provides an alternative way to examine the legacy of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. It does so by showing how contemporary leading intellectual historians, anthropologists and political theorists trace all that is wrong with current age back to the Protestant Reformation and its unintended consequences. In putting forward this argument it makes three observations: 1) The attack against the Protestant Reformation today is inseparable from a critique of liberalism that emerged after the fall of the Soviet Union; 2) Recent critiques of Protestantism are, in fact, reviving a long tradition of Catholic anti-Protestantism with deep roots in the nineteenth Century; 3) There is a strange political convergence between Left and Right over their mutual disdain of Protestantism, and specifically its connection to human rights, religious freedom and international law.

Daniel Steinmetz-Jenkins is a historian of Modern Western European Political and Intellectual History with a specific focus on 20th century France and Germany. He primarily concentrates on such topics as conservatism, nationalism, secularism, and religion and politics.  He is currently working on a manuscript for Columbia University Press titled, Raymond Aron and Postwar American Political Ideologies. He is the former managing editor of the Immanent Frame, which is the Social Science Research Council’s website devoted to questions of religion, secularism and the public sphere. His public commentary has appeared in The Nation, Foreign Affairs, The Atlantic, Times Literary Supplement, Dissent Magazine, and elsewhere. In 2016-2017 he was the post-doctoral fellow in Public Theology for UC Berkeley’s Center for the Study of Religion. At Yale he will be offering religion and politics courses in the Department of Religious Studies.

Apr 182017
 
 April 18, 2017  Tagged with:

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and African and African American Studies, Joseph Winters, was recently interviewed for Princeton Alumni Weekly. Winters

In it, Winters discusses his recent book, Hope Draped in Black:

The American way of thinking can be quite optimistic. We tend to embrace the idea that the future will always be better, and hope is seen as the opposite of the melancholic and the tragic. But it seems to me that the melancholic can actually make us aware of the suffering that has been — and continues to be — part of our world. It ensures that we don’t forget. So our hope for a better world really becomes dependent on the idea that we can continue to acknowledge suffering and violence and tragedy, in our past and in our present.

Read the interview here.

Apr 172017
 
 April 17, 2017  Tagged with:

Stanley Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor Emeritus of Divinity and Law, recently co-wrote an article for ABC Religion and Ethics, “A Sanctuary Politics: Being the Church in the Time of Trump

In these fear inducing times, Christians can find sanctuary in the body of Christ as the politics through which God gives God’s people everything they need to be faithful. Christians can lean into the church as the impetus for political action, and the church as itself political action, by way of an account of history that inscribes the church as sanctuary for the oppressed wherever and however they are oppressed.

Read the article here.

Apr 092017
 
 April 9, 2017  Tagged with:

The Duke Center for Jewish Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke, Duke-UNC Middle Eastern Consortium, Duke Asian and Pacific Studies Institute, and the Duke Middle East Studies Center will host on Oct. 18 a lecture on ‘An Italian Jesuit in Canton & the War on the Chinese: “Orientalism,” Conquest, & the Eastern Indian Ocean in the 16th c.,’ at 6pm in the Thomas Room (2nd floor), Lilly Library. Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Professor in the Department of History and the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at Faculty of Arts & Science at New York University, will present the lecture.

A light dinner will be served.

For more information on the event, contact Serena Bazemore at serena.elliott@duke.edu.

  • 6 p.m., Oct. 18
  • Thomas Room 
  • Lilly Library
Apr 092017
 
 April 9, 2017  Tagged with:

The Duke Center for Jewish Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke, Duke-UNC Middle Eastern Consortium, Duke Asian and Pacific Studies Institute, and the Duke Middle East Studies Center will host on Oct. 19 a lecture on ‘An Arab Jew in Rome: “Zionism” and “Islamophobia” in the 16th c. and Now,’ at 12pm in the Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Smith Warehouse (Bay 4, C105). Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Professor in the Department of History and the Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at Faculty of Arts & Science at New York University, will present the lecture.

For more information on the event, contact Serena Bazemore at serena.elliott@duke.edu.

  • 12 p.m., Oct. 19
  • Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall
  • Smith Warehouse