People

 

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan)

Dr. Doron Avraham is a senior lecturer at the General History Department in Bar Ilan University...

Dr. Doron Avraham is a senior lecturer at the General History Department in Bar Ilan University. His main filed of research and instruction is modern German history, with a focus on the history of nineteenth century German political and religious thought. Recently Doron was a research fellow at the History Faculty in Oxford University. He published in Germany his book about Prussian conservatism, and he is also the author of a series of articles in international journals. Currently he is writing a book about German neo-pietism, Jews and nationalism.

 
James Chappel (Duke)

James Chappel is Assistant Professor of History at Duke University...

James Chappel is Assistant Professor of History at Duke University. He studies the intellectual, political, and religious history of modern Europe. He is currently completing a manuscript entitled “Spiritual Welfare: Catholic Political Economy in Twentieth Century Europe” (forthcoming from Harvard University Press). This work studies Catholic social-economic thought as a transnational whole, arguing that it had massive and overlooked impact on the shape of post-1945 Europe, where its influence was mediated through the new Christian Democratic parties that swept to power across the continent. He is also working, as a second project, on the institutional and social-scientific consolidation of the family in post-1945 Europe, and is particularly interested in how the “problem of aging” is conceived and administered.

 
Alexander Deeg (Leipzig)

Prof. Dr. Alexander Deeg is a pastor of the Lutheran Church and holds the chair for Practical Theology at Leipzig University...

Prof. Dr. Alexander Deeg, born in 1972, is a pastor of the Lutheran Church and holds the chair for Practical Theology at Leipzig University in Germany. He concentrates on the fields of worship and homiletics, as well as for many years on Jewish-Christian dialogue. In 1995/96 he pursued Jewish studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem – a starting-point for his continuous engagement in the theory and practice of Jewish-Christian encounter. In his dissertation (Predigt und Derascha) he reread traditional Jewish hermeneutics in the light of contemporary homiletical questions. Deeg is (among others) the director of the Lutheran Institute of Liturgical Studies, the Secretary of Societas Homiletica and one of the editors of the International Journal of Homiletics.

 
Ari Geiger (Bar Ilan)

Dr. Ari Geiger is a member of the Department of General History in Bar Ilan University...

Dr. Ari Geiger is a member of the Department of General History in Bar Ilan University. His fields of interest are intellectual and religious history of Medieval Europe and specifically the relationship between Judaism and Christianity in the Middle Ages. His field of expertise is Christian Hebraism, especially in the aspect of Christian exegesis and its relations with Jewish biblical interpretation. He published several articles on medieval Christian scholars and Jewish literature. He is now working on a book entitled “Hebraism in the Absence of Hebrews: Nicholas of Lyra and Christian Hebraism in Fourteenth-Century France”.

 
Malachi Hacohen (Duke)

Malachi H. Hacohen is Associate Professor of History, Political Science and Religion...

Malachi H. Hacohen is Associate Professor of History, Political Science and Religion, a Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and a Bass Fellow at Duke University. He is the director of the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and director of the Duke Center for European Studies. He teaches European intellectual history and Jewish history. He has previously taught at Columbia University, New York University, and Reed College. His research interests focus on Central Europe and include social theory, political philosophy, and rabbinic literature – Midrash to Kabbalah to halakhic responsa. Hacohen writes on the Central European Jewish intelligentsia, the European nation state vs. empire, Jewish-Christian relations, and the dilemmas of writing Jewish European history that is both cosmopolitan European and authentically Jewish. He is presently completing a book in Jewish European history focusing on the biblical story of Jacob and Esau (Jews and Christians) as it is told through the ages. Chapters include the biblical and rabbinic period, medieval & early modern Judaism, Jewish emancipation, the European nation state and the Central European Jewish intelligentsia, the Austrian Empire and the Jews, post-Holocaust Europe and the State of Israel. Some of Hacohen’s recent articles deal with Cold War liberalism, the Congress for Cultural Freedom and the formation of a public sphere in postwar Central Europe, and Austrian scientific culture at the turn of the twentieth-century.

 
Ellen McLarney (Duke)

Ellen McLarney is Associate Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies...

Ellen McLarney is Associate Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University. Her training is in Comparative Literature and Middle East Studies — at the intersection of cultures, languages, peoples, civilizations, and literatures. Her early research was on the Arabic novel, as a vehicle of cross-cultural fertilization under the conditions of colonial modernity, but also as an alternative vision of indigenous political and cultural expression. Her current project uses a cultural studies approach to analyze the media networks cultivated by Islamic communities and institutions in Latin America, as well as related cultural output—films dubbed into Spanish from Farsi and Arabic, Spanish and Portuguese literature revolving around Islamic themes, transnational connections between Beirut and Brazil in the art world, Latin American political movements that invoke Palestine, and a shared political vocabulary of decolonization, social justice, and liberation theology that articulates not just South-South solidarities, but also the contours of a contemporary Latin American Islam.

 
Abdeslam Maghraoui (Duke)

Abdeslam E. M. Maghraoui is associate professor of the practice of political science...

Abdeslam E. M. Maghraoui is associate professor of the practice of political science at Duke University. He is core faculty in the Duke Islamic Studies Center and Duke University Middle East Studies Center. His research focuses on the interactions between culture and politics in the context of Arab and Muslim majority countries. His work encompasses three overlapping areas of research: “political identity,” “political institutions,” and “political behavior and attitudes.” His work on political identity investigates the tensions between the modern notion of citizenship and competing social identities in the Middle East. His research on institutions examines how autocratic Arab monarchies, which draw legitimacy from inherited tradition use modern institutions to reproduce non-democratic forms of domination. His work on political attitudes explores the tensions between conformity to group norms and the quest for individual autonomy among youths in predominantly Muslim societies. The common thread among these three areas of research is an exploration of the central role of language as a tool to assert identity, renew authoritarian relations, and claim individual autonomy.

 
Zohar Maor (Bar Ilan)

Dr. Zohar Maor lectures on modern history at Bar-Ilan University and Herzog College...

Dr. Zohar Maor lectures on modern history at Bar-Ilan University and Herzog College (Israel). Among his publications are a Hebrew Biography of Martin Buber (2016), “Reconciling the Opposites: Max Brod and Nationalism in Prague” in the last issue of German Studies Review and “Hans Kohn: The Idea of secularized Nationalism” in the upcoming issue of Nations and Nationalism.

 
Hilda Nissimi (Bar Ilan)

Dr. Hilda Nissimi, chair of the General History Department at Bar-Ilan University...

Dr. Hilda Nissimi, chair of the General History Department at Bar-Ilan University, Israel, is interested and has published on the subject of collective identity. She has published several articles and a book on the Mashhadi community and the importance of its memory practices on its formation since the forced conversion in 1839. She is now interested in reading Jewish and Israeli museums as an identity texts. Her research on community museums in Israel was published in Jewish Culture and History.

 
Amber Pearson (Duke)

Amber Díaz Pearson is a Research Scholar at the Kenan Institute for Ethics...

Amber Díaz Pearson is a Research Scholar at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. She works on research and programming with the Rethinking Regulation Program and the Religions and Public Life Initiative, manages the survey research and data analysis, as well as writing reports, articles, and conference presentations for the Education for Civic and Moral Responsibility project, supervises two student researchers, and oversees the KIE Campus Grants Program and the Moral Purpose Award essay competition. She also teaches Refugee Policy and Practice for DukeImmerse: De-Constructing/Re-Constructing. Previously, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow in Human Rights at KIE where she taught international law and refugee policy for DukeImmerse: Uprooted/Rerouted, served as the DukeImmerse Field Director in Nepal, coordinated the Ethics Film Series, and worked with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics. Her research interests include international ethics, public opinion, and experimental, qualitative, and multimethod research tools. Amber holds a B.S. in Political Science and a B.A. in Spanish from Arizona State University, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University.

 
Carolyn Sanzenbacher (Southampton)

Dr. Carolyn Sanzenbacher is Honorary Fellow at the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/Non-Jewish Relations...

Dr. Carolyn Sanzenbacher is Honorary Fellow at the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/Non-Jewish Relations, University of Southampton. Her research is focused in the history of antisemitism, with emphasis on the anti-Judaic teachings of Christianity and their causal relations to the Holocaust. Her doctoral dissertation examined the role of the Jewish Question in ecumenical Protestant aspirations for world expansion of Jewish evangelization in the years immediately before, during, and after the Holocaust. She is currently in the last stage of a book on relations between Christian organizational understanding of antisemitism and Christian organizational responses to antisemitism during the Hitler years. The work examines the network of international bodies that constituted the Protestant ecumenical movement of the early twentieth century, the streams of thought on antisemitism that flowed through its channels, and formal organizational protests against antisemitism between 1933 and 1945. She is part of the Parkes Institute outreach team on Christian-Jewish relations, and is presently involved in a study on challenges to post-Holocaust Christian-Jewish dialogue.

 
Noah Strote (NCSU)

Noah Strote is Assistant Professor of History at North Carolina State University...

Noah Strote is Assistant Professor of History at North Carolina State University and received his Ph.D. at UC Berkeley in 2011 and has also studied at Columbia University in the City of New York and the Humboldt University of Berlin. He offers lectures in modern European history and German history, as well as seminars in selected topics such as Fascism and National Socialism, imperialism, the Holocaust, and the Cold War.

 
Todd Weir (Groningen)

Todd Weir is Professor of History of Christianity and Modern Culture at the University of Groningen...

Todd Weir is Professor of History of Christianity and Modern Culture at the University of Groningen, where he also directs the new Centre for Religion and Heritage. Prior to his move to the Netherlands in 2016, Todd taught history for nine years at Queen’s University Belfast. He published a study on Secularism and Religion in Nineteenth Century Germany: The Rise of the Fourth Confession in 2014 with Cambridge University Press. His next major research project will be a transnational history of the term “worldview” from 1790 to the present.

 
Deirdre White (Duke)

Deirdre White is a cultural anthropologist and classical musician...

Deirdre White is a cultural anthropologist and classical musician with a special interest in the interrelationship between music and First Nations peoples. She is Program Coordinator of Council for European Studies at Duke University, as well as coordinator of the Africa Initiative at Duke University, the Triangle Intellectual History Seminar and the North Carolina Jewish Studies Seminar. She holds a BA in Cultural Anthropology from New York University, and her forthcoming Masters Thesis (Cultural Anthropology, University of Alberta, 2017), ‘The Social Life of Sound: Urban Indigenous Youth, Hip Hop and Hardcore,’ centers on the ways in which musical engagement has impacted the emotional and social well-being of Métis, First Nations and First Nations-allied youth in Canada and the U.S.