Oct 272016
 
 October 27, 2016

Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks will present on the multi-faceted role of religious dialogue in public spaces.

Rabbi Sacks is a British rabbi, philosopher and scholar of Judaism. Since stepping down as the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth – a position he served for 22 years between 1991 and 2013 – Rabbi Sacks has held a number of professorships at several academic institutions including Yeshiva University and King’s College London. He currently serves as the Ingeborg and Ira Rennert Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. He was recently named the winner of the 2016 Templeton Prize in recognition of his “exceptional contributions to affirming life’s spiritual dimension.”

Monday, March 27
5:30pm
Penn Pavilion

For more information about the event, see this Duke Today story.

Co-sponsored by Duke Center for Jewish Studies, Religion and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and The Sanford School of Public Policy.

 

Oct 202016
 
 October 20, 2016  Tagged with: ,

Russia-Mellon11-11Robert G. Morrison, professor and chair of the religion department at Bowdoin College, will be giving a public talk as well as participating in the Muslim Diasporas Seminar of the Religions and Public Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke.

Prof. Morrison came to Bowdoin College since 2008.  He teaches courses in the academic study of both Islam and Judaism, but address, in addition, comparative topics. Prof. Morrison’s research has focused on the role of science in Islamic and Jewish texts, as well as in the history of Islamic science.  He has contributed the chapters on Islamic astronomy to the New Cambridge History of Islam and the Cambridge History of Science.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

This spring, the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics in collaboration with FHI Humanities Futures and the Department of History, will host three scholars of Islamic and comparative studies. Each will give a public talk and participate in the Muslim Diasporas working group seminar during their visit.

Oct 172016
 
 October 17, 2016  Tagged with: ,

Reinhardt
Please join the Religions and Public Life Society of Scholars graduate student group, along with the Conversion Working Group, for a seminar with Nicole Reinhardt on Monday evening, April 17.

Dr. Reinhardt’s talk is titled, “Merit, Sin, and Politics in Early Modern Casuistry.” A major problem accompanying the expansion of the state in the early modern period was the distribution of offices. But what did it mean to appoint a qualified person, and how free were monarchs to appoint ministers, or sell offices? For early modern moral theologians such questions were sources of deep moral and political anxiety, and they debated them fiercely. The key theological concept at stake was that of acceptio personarum (‘respect of person’), which Thomas Aquinas had declared the foremost sin against distributive justice. As this talk will show, the coordinates of the controversies widened throughout the sixteenth century in line with the expanding geographical, political, and financial horizons of early modern monarchies. To follow their evolution and critical junctures allows us to explore the ethical turmoil state-building caused and which is all too often been overlooked by intellectual historians.

Nicole Reinhardt is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) for early modern European History at the University of Durham (UK). She studied History and Romance Languages at the universities of Heidelberg, Coimbra, and Freiburg i. Br., and she holds a PhD in History and Civilization from the European University Institute in Florence. She specializes in the comparative history of political and religious culture of seventeenth-century Catholic Europe (Italy, Spain, and France). She has held fellowships at the Harry Ransom Center in Austin/Texas (2017); IAS Princeton (2014-2015); the Max-Weber-Kolleg Erfurt (2011-2012), and she has been visiting professor at the university Paris I-Sorbonne (2011) and the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (2007). Her latest book, Voices of Conscience. Royal Confessors and Political Counsel in Seventeenth-Century Spain and France, appeared in October 2016 with Oxford University Press.

Monday, April 17
5:00-7:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
(West Duke 101, East Campus)

Oct 062016
 
 October 6, 2016

ian macmullenFor its March 6 Monday Seminar Series, Kenan Institute for Ethics welcomes Ian MacMullen, visiting associate professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy.

MacMullen, a political theorist whose primary research and teaching interests lie in the politics of education and of religious and cultural pluralism, will present “Religious Schools, Civic Education, & Public Policy.” His most recent book, Civics Beyond Critics: Character Education in a Liberal Democracy, explores the ways in which civic education in a liberal democracy could and should shape children’s values, beliefs, preferences, habits, identities, and sentiments.

MacMullen’s current research concerns the moral permissibility of articulating and/or acting on the basis of religious reasons in politics. He is developing an evaluation of the claim, frequently advanced by proponents of “public reason” that religious arguments are unfit to justify the state’s coercive activities because these arguments depend upon beliefs whose grounds are not accessible to all citizens.

MacMullen received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. He joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis in 2007, received tenure in 2015, and accepted a visiting position at Duke in 2016.

MacMullen will present from noon to 1:30 p.m. March 6 in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke Building Room 101. Lunch will be provided and those interested in attending must RSVP by emailing Bashar Alobaidi at bashar.alobaidi@duke.edu.

The Monday Seminar Series, hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics, fosters a interdisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from across the University to discuss cutting edge research in ethics broadly conceived. For more information and upcoming speakers, visit the series website.

Sep 272016
 
 September 27, 2016  Tagged with: ,

Presented by Muslim Europe: African and Asian Diasporas, Migrations and Continental Histories, and The Program for Archives of Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean, the Symposium on Muslim African Intellectual History will have Prof. Ousmane Oumar Kane give the keynote address, entitled, “Beyond Timbuktu: An Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa.”  He is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Chair on Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society at the Harvard Divinity School and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at Harvard University.

The keynote address will be followed by a panel and round-table discussion featuring:

“Fulbe Literature in Arabic in 19th-century West Africa”
Mohamed Diagayété, Associate Director, Institut des Hautes Études et de Recherche Islamique – Ahmad Baba, Timbuktu, Mali

“L’esclavage à travers les fatawa ouest-africaines” (with translation)
Mahamane Mahamoudou, Independent scholar, Timbutku, Mali

“Reading the Life and Politics of a 20th-century Timbuktu Religious Scholar Through his Historiography,”
Mohamed Shaid Mathee, University of Johannesburg, South Africa

“The Correspondence of Ahmad al-Bakkay al-Kunti (d.1865)”
Ali Diakité, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Monday, March 27, 2017
2:00-5:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
101 West Duke Bldg, East Campus

This spring, the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics in collaboration with FHI Humanities Futures and the Department of History, will host three scholars of Islamic and comparative studies. Each will give a public talk and participate in the Muslim Diasporas working group seminar during their visit.

Sep 252016
 
 September 25, 2016  Tagged with: ,

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, a religious leader, philosopher and author of more than 30 books, will deliver a 2017 Terry Sanford Distinguished Lecture, “Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence,” with an introduction by Duke President Richard Brodhead.  Sacks’ most recent book, “Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence,” examines the concept of “altruistic evil” and identifies the roots of faith-based violence in misreadings of key biblical texts.

Seating is first-come, first-served. The lecture will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Tuesday, March 28
5:30-7:30pm
Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

For more information about the event, see this Duke Today story.

Co-sponsored by Duke Center for Jewish Studies, Religion and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and The Sanford School of Public Policy.

Sep 072016
 
 September 7, 2016

Duke doctoral student in History, Daanish Faruqi, will be participating in a roundtable discussion to talk about the new book he has co-edited with Dalia Fahmy, entitled, Egypt and the Contradictions of Liberalism: Illiberal Intelligentsia and the Future of Egyptian Democracy (London: Oneworld Press, 2017).  Prof. Michael Hardt (Program in Literature, Duke) and Prof. Frances Hasso (Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies, Duke) will serve as discussants for this conversation.

Tuesday, March 7
Noon-1:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
101 West Duke Bldg, East Campus

RSVP here.  Lunch will be provided.

Co-sponsored by Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and the Department of History at Duke.

Jul 222016
 
 July 22, 2016

Prof. Mostafa Minawi, Assistant Professor of History and the Director of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Initiative (OTSI) at Cornell University, will be giving a talk entitled, “International Law for the Weak State: The Case of the Ottoman Empire in the Nineteenth Century.”

This is a book talk on Professor Minawi’s The Ottoman Scramble for Africa. Professor Minawi will explore the role that the philosophy behind 19th-century notions of international law played in maintaining and expanding an exclusively European colonial possession in Africa and Asia. Using the Ottoman Empire’s participation in the Conference in Berlin (1884-85) as a case study, he will argue that Istanbul understood how positivist international law gave the upper hand to the Great Powers, but continued to be deeply invested in the maintaining its place at the table of negotiations with other imperial powers, not just to claim the “right” to new territories in central Africa, but also in order to maintain a legal right to sovereignty within the borders of the Ottoman Empire.

Prof. Minawi’s current research project focuses on the life and work an Ottoman officer and diplomat who lived in Istanbul but travelled extensively in Africa and Europe. Currently, he is writing on an annotated translation of one of his travelogues that he wrote on a journey to Addis Ababa, tentatively titled,”An Ottoman Officer and a Gentleman in East Africa.” Prof Minawi is also the author of the book, “The Ottoman Scramble for Africa” (Stanford University Press, 2016).

Monday, February 27
12:00-1:30pm
229 Carr Building, East Campus

Co-sponsored by the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the Duke Middle East Center, and the Africa Initiative.

Jul 212016
 
 July 21, 2016

Dr. James McDougall, Laithwaite Fellow and Tutor in Modern History at the University of Oxford, will be giving a public talk on 02/21 as well as participating in the Muslim Diasporas Working Group seminar of the Religions and Public Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke on 02/22. RSVP for the lunch on Wednesday, 02/22 here.

Dr. McDougall’s current research is divided between two projects:

  • One concerns “the everyday life of colonialism” and the after-effects of empire in France and Africa; he holds a Leverhulme Trust Major Research Fellowship for this project (2014-17);
  • The other focuses on the global history of Islam since the eighteenth century.

Dr. McDougall is also interested in historical methodology, the intersections of history and critical theory, and comparative historiography. He is the Academic Director of the University’s Humanitas Visiting Professorship in Historiography, which brings distinguished historians to Trinity College, Oxford, each year for a program of lectures and workshops.

Public Lecture:
“The Sacred Space of France, Race, Religion, Citizenship and Empire”
Tuesday, February 21
Noon-1:30pm
229 Carr, East Camp

Lunchtime Seminar
Wednesday, February 22
Noon-1:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
101 West Duke Bldg, East Campus

This spring, the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics in collaboration with FHI Humanities Futures and the Department of History, will host three scholars of Islamic and comparative studies. Each will give a public talk and participate in the Muslim Diasporas working group seminar during their visit.

 

Jul 202016
 
 July 20, 2016

RPLI
The next meeting of the Muslim Diasporas Working Group of Religions and Public Life at KIE will be on Friday, January 27 at 11:30AM, featuring a seminar by Adam Mestyan, Assistant Professor of History: “The Philanthropic Nation – Solidarity and The Middle Classes in the Late Ottoman Empire.” Contact David Steinbrenner for a copy of the paper and to RSVP for lunch.

Adam Mestyan is an historian of the modern Middle East. His first monograph, Arab Patriotism – The Ideology and Culture of Power in Late Ottoman Egypt (Princeton University Press, 2017) presents a new story and theory about the birth of nationalism in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire. Previously, he taught at Oxford University and held fellowships at Harvard University and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. He was also elected in 2016 as a Freigeist Fellow by the Volkswagen Foundation for his new project “Modern Arab Kingship.” He also supervises a digital humanities project: Jara’id – A Chronology of Nineteenth-Century Periodicals in Arabic.

Friday, January 20
11:30am-1:00pm
101 West Duke Building,
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room