Feb 282017
 
 February 28, 2017  Tagged with:

Join the Kenan Institute for Ethics for its annual celebration kicking off the new academic year. Enjoy food and reconnect with friends after a summer away from campus. The event will be held on the lawn outside the West Duke Building on East Campus.

Students, faculty, staff and their families are welcome.

Nov 272016
 
 November 27, 2016

Vasileios Syros, a Maurice Amado Fellow at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and a Senior Research Fellow at the Academy of Finland, will  introduce a new perspective on Islamic debates on violence by focusing on Islamic political advice literature on good government and the origins and effects of oppressive or arbitrary rule.

Syros will explore how the distinction between ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ power can serve as a heuristic device for the examination of a set of medieval Islamic writings on the successful conduct of government. In addition, the paper will relate these ideas to European political thought, such as Machiavelli’s The Prince. The ultimate objective of the talk will be to identify and analyze broader affinities and points of intersection between Western and non-Western modes of political theorizing on statecraft and styles of leadership.

Noon to 2 p.m.
April 27
West Duke 08C
Lunch is provided

Nov 232016
 
 November 23, 2016

In the 21st century, religion has made a surprising and powerful return, and has had major impact on public affairs, domestic and international alike. Scholars are still scrambling to understand the phenomenon’s significance, and those concerned for the preservation of constitutional norms and civility have been searching for new forms of interreligious dialogue.

To better address today’s unique challenges, Religions & Public Life will bring together scholars for “Interreligious Dialogue in the Post-Secular Age” from April 24 to 25.

Do we live in a post-secular age? Has the Weberian concept of modernity proved inadequate? Does postmodernity open new opportunities for religious dialogue? Scholars at five Israeli, European & American universities will be exploring these questions with a view to launching a long-term international collaboration that may result in the establishment of a new institute.

The workshop will take place on April 24 to 25, 2017 at Duke University, a founding member of the group, with hospitality extended by the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Nov 132016
 
 November 13, 2016

Kenan Institute for Ethics’ Research Scholar Amber Diaz Pearson will participate in an April 13 moderated discussion on the policy and impact of executive orders put in place by the Trump Administration dealing with refugee resettlement and immigration. She’ll be joined by Darren Beattie, a Duke political science instructor.

Beattie will provide a positive view of the administration’s recent executive orders, while Pearson will offer a critical perspective.

“Scaling the Wall: Should Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration be Repealed?” is presented by the Duke Alexander Hamilton Society and Duke Bench and Bar. It will take place at 6 p.m. April 13 in Perkins Library Room 217. It’s free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

Nov 102016
 
 November 10, 2016

Join Behrooz Ghamari, Professor of History at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, for his talk “Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment.” Ghamari is the author of Islam & Dissent in Post-Revolutionary Iran, Foucault in Iran: Islamic Revolution after the Enlightenment, and Remembering Akbar: Inside the Iranian Revolution. Lunch will be provided.

More information

Monday, April 10
12:00-1:15pm
Smith Warehouse, Bay 4,
Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall (FHI Garage)

Sponsored by the Humanities Futures Initiative at FHI, the Kenan Institute for Ethics Campus Grants Program, DUMESC, DISC, the Offices of Dean Nowicki and Dr. Petters, the Department of Cultural Anthropology, and the DHRC@FHI.

Nov 012016
 
 November 1, 2016  Tagged with: ,

RPLI-book
Please join us for a roundtable discussion of our colleague Mona Hassan’s new book Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History (Princeton University Press, December 2016) with Richard Bulliet (Columbia University) and Vincent Cornell (Emory University).

Richard Bulliet and Vincent Cornell will present on the scholarly interventions of Longing for the Lost Caliphate followed by Mona Hassan’s response as the author and an open discussion of the book among those in attendance.

RSVP for the lunch on this form or by emailing Bruce Hall.

The roundtable is sponsored by the Triangle Seminar on the Histories of Muslim Societies & Communities, the Graduate Program in Religion, and Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Monday, May 1
11:30 am – 1:30 pm
225 Friedl, East Campus

Oct 272016
 
 October 27, 2016

Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks will present on the multi-faceted role of religious dialogue in public spaces.

Rabbi Sacks is a British rabbi, philosopher and scholar of Judaism. Since stepping down as the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth – a position he served for 22 years between 1991 and 2013 – Rabbi Sacks has held a number of professorships at several academic institutions including Yeshiva University and King’s College London. He currently serves as the Ingeborg and Ira Rennert Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. He was recently named the winner of the 2016 Templeton Prize in recognition of his “exceptional contributions to affirming life’s spiritual dimension.”

Monday, March 27
5:30pm
Penn Pavilion

For more information about the event, see this Duke Today story.

Co-sponsored by Duke Center for Jewish Studies, Religion and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and The Sanford School of Public Policy.

 

Oct 232016
 
 October 23, 2016  Tagged with: ,

RPLI-book
In the twenty-first century, religion has made a surprising and powerful return, and has had major impact on public affairs, domestic and international alike. Scholars are still scrambling to understand the phenomenon’s significance, and those concerned for the preservation of constitutional norms and civility have been searching for new forms of interreligious dialogue. Do we live in a post-secular age? Has the Weberian concept of modernity proved inadequate? Does postmodernity open new opportunities for religious dialogue? Scholars at five Israeli, European & American universities will be exploring these questions with a view to launching a long-term international collaboration that may result in the establishment of a new institute. The workshop will take place on April 24-25, 2017 at Duke University, a founding member of the group, with hospitality extended by the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Please see the conference website for the full program and additional information.

Attendees are also welcome to attend the NCJSS seminar, pre-conference, on Sunday, April 23, 3:00-5:00pm at the John Hope Franklin Center. See NC Jewish Studies Seminar website for details.

Monday, April 24 – Tuesday, April 25
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (West Duke 101)
The Kenan Institute for Ethics

Oct 202016
 
 October 20, 2016

Russia-Mellon11-11Robert G. Morrison, professor and chair of the religion department at Bowdoin College, will be presenting in the Muslim Diasporas Working Group lunch seminar of the Religions and Public Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke: “An Economy of Knowledge in the Eastern Mediterranean.”

This presentation, focused on intellectual life in the Eastern Mediterranean around 1500, will show how much Renaissance Italy owes to earlier scholars located in Islamic societies. The link between the Renaissance and earlier centuries was a network of Jewish scholars who bridged the Ottoman Empire, Candia (on Crete), and the Veneto. These scholars exchanged information on topics that included astronomy, astrology, medicine, philosophy, and religious thought. Although historians of science have been most attracted to the possibility of explaining the parallels between Renaissance astronomy and the astronomy of Islamic societies, this presentation demonstrates that there is a much broader context that comprised a number of fields. Most important, we shall see that information flowed in both directions as the scholarly intermediaries were quite interested in developments in Europe.

Prof. Morrison came to Bowdoin College since 2008.  He teaches courses in the academic study of both Islam and Judaism, but address, in addition, comparative topics. Prof. Morrison’s research has focused on the role of science in Islamic and Jewish texts, as well as in the history of Islamic science.  He has contributed the chapters on Islamic astronomy to the New Cambridge History of Islam and the Cambridge History of Science.

Lunch provided; please RSVP here.

Thursday, April 20, 2017
Noon-1:30pm
Kenan Institute for Ethics,
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
(West Duke 101)

This spring, the Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics in collaboration with FHI Humanities Futures and the Department of History, will host three scholars of Islamic and comparative studies. Each will give a public talk and participate in the Muslim Diasporas working group seminar during their visit.

Oct 172016
 
 October 17, 2016

Reinhardt
Please join the Religions and Public Life Society of Scholars graduate student group, along with the Conversions Working Group, for a seminar with Nicole Reinhardt on Monday evening, April 17.

Dr. Reinhardt’s talk is titled, “Merit, Sin, and Politics in Early Modern Casuistry.” A major problem accompanying the expansion of the state in the early modern period was the distribution of offices. But what did it mean to appoint a qualified person, and how free were monarchs to appoint ministers, or sell offices? For early modern moral theologians such questions were sources of deep moral and political anxiety, and they debated them fiercely. The key theological concept at stake was that of acceptio personarum (‘respect of person’), which Thomas Aquinas had declared the foremost sin against distributive justice. As this talk will show, the coordinates of the controversies widened throughout the sixteenth century in line with the expanding geographical, political, and financial horizons of early modern monarchies. To follow their evolution and critical junctures allows us to explore the ethical turmoil state-building caused and which is all too often been overlooked by intellectual historians.

Nicole Reinhardt is Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) for early modern European History at the University of Durham (UK). She studied History and Romance Languages at the universities of Heidelberg, Coimbra, and Freiburg i. Br., and she holds a PhD in History and Civilization from the European University Institute in Florence. She specializes in the comparative history of political and religious culture of seventeenth-century Catholic Europe (Italy, Spain, and France). She has held fellowships at the Harry Ransom Center in Austin/Texas (2017); IAS Princeton (2014-2015); the Max-Weber-Kolleg Erfurt (2011-2012), and she has been visiting professor at the university Paris I-Sorbonne (2011) and the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa (2007). Her latest book, Voices of Conscience. Royal Confessors and Political Counsel in Seventeenth-Century Spain and France, appeared in October 2016 with Oxford University Press.

Monday, April 17
5:00pm
Friedl 225, East Campus