Feb 162018
 
 February 16, 2018  Tagged with:

On February 22, Religions and Public Life will host a seminar featuring a new project by Dr. Michael McVaugh (UNC-CH), Dr. Gerrit Bos (Cologne), and Dr. Joseph Shatzmiller (Duke), speaking on the medieval transmission and translation of Arabic medical texts through the West.

Thursday, February 22
3:30-5:30PM
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
West Duke Building, Room 101

Abstract: The transforming effect of Islamic learning on medieval European civilization, far more poorly known today than it should be, was facilitated by a flood of Arabic-to-Latin translations of medical and philosophical writings in the years 1000-1300. The interreligious and intercultural aspects of these translations and transmissions are notable: Jews were often intermediates in translation because they could read the Arabic and translate it into the Romance vernacular for the Christian translators to go on and turn into Latin. The speakers will give a summary account of this movement, and then go on to examine its effects more closely by studying one specific medical translation that is an utterly unique witness to the process of Arabic-Latin translation in general—its difficulties and its successes, and its methods, with their combination of faithfulness to the original and successful adaptation to new circumstances. This 12th-c Arabic work exists in a Latin version made by a Jewish scholar who translated the Arabic into the Romance vernacular for a Christian surgeon to turn into Latin, and then made his own Hebrew translation of the same text. The speakers will invite reflections on how far translation can allow one culture’s achievements to be communicated to and internalized by another.

Joseph Shatzmiller is the Smart Family Professor Emeritus in Judaic Studies in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. He is the author of Shylock Reconsidered: Jews, Moneylending and Medieval Society and a more recent volume on Jews, Medicine, and Medieval Society, along with numerous essays on European Jewry in the Middle Ages. He has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research, and he has taught Jewish history at the University of Haifa and the University of Toronto.

Michael McVaugh is Professor Emeritus and William Smith Wells Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the growth of medical and surgical learning in the Middle Ages, particularly as shaped by the thirteenth- and fourteenth-century universities, and on the concomitant medicalization of European life. Since 1975 he has been a general editor of the collected Latin writings of one of the most famous of medieval physicians, Arnau de Vilanova (d. 1311), a series now nearly complete. Most recently he has been engaged in a series of studies investigating aspects of the process of translation of medical literature in the Middle Ages: translations between Arabic and Latin, between Hebrew and Latin, and between Latin and the European vernaculars.

Gerrit Bos is Professor Emeritus and former Chair of the Martin-Buber-Institut at Cologne University. His main fields of research are medieval Jewish-Islamic science, especially medicine, medieval Hebrew and Judeo-Arabic. Current projects include developing critical editions of Maimonides’ medical works, and editing and translating previously unpublished middle Hebrew medical-botanical texts. (Dr. Bos will be unable to join the seminar at this time.)

For more information, please contact Amber Díaz Pearson. Those coming from outside of Duke University may request a parking pass.

Feb 132018
 
 February 13, 2018  Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Celebrate the start of the new school year with the Kenan Institute for Ethics! Enjoy great food and reconnect with friends and colleagues after a summer away from campus!

Thursday, August 30th, 5:30 PM

West Duke Building Lawn, East Campus

Students, faculty, staff and their families are welcome!

Nov 032017
 
 November 3, 2017  Tagged with:


Join Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and the North Carolina Jewish Studies Seminar for lunch at noon on April 3 for a discussion with Dr. Anna Kushkova: “Memory of the Holocaust and Jewish Identity in Soviet and post-Soviet Ukraine.”

Based on Dr. Kushkova’s field research in the former shtetls of Western Ukraine, this presentation is an attempt to look at several small Jewish survivor communities living in the territory of the former Pale of Jewish Settlement (Ukraine) through the lens of their Holocaust experience. What place does the Holocaust occupy in the structure of these people’s individual and collective identity? How do people speak about the Holocaust, how do their narratives change over different historical periods and under the influence of different external actors, and how do they get appropriated by official political discourses? How do post-Holocaust commemoration practices create specific local lieux de mémoire?

Dr. Anna Kushkova is a visiting scholar at Duke University and holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation, Navigating the Planned Economy: Accommodation and Survival in Moscow’s Post-War ‘Soviet Jewish Pale’, focuses on Jewish engagement in the marginal and illicit spheres of the Soviet post-WWII rigidly controlled state economy to show a) how Jewish ethnic traditions and social networking can facilitate cultural survival among oppressed minorities and b) how Jewish entrepreneurship in the local networks of production and distribution created a distinct version of Soviet Jewish collective identity. Dr. Kushkova has participated in multiple ethnographic expeditions to the former official Pale of Jewish Settlement (Ukraine, Moldova, Trans-Dniestr Republic) and various research projects on Jewish memory and identity in the large urban settings of St. Petersburg and Moscow.

Tuesday, April 3, Noon-2:00PM
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
West Duke Building 101

Please email Amber Díaz Pearson by 10:00AM on April 3 to request a parking pass. A Kosher for Passover lunch will be served.

Oct 202017
 
 October 20, 2017  Tagged with: , ,


The Cost of Opportunity: Educate to Liberate

Friday, April 20, 2018
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Divinity School Room 0014W
Duke West Campus

See attached flyer for more details. The complete conference program can be found at https://sites.duke.edu/project_duke_baixada_project/cost-of-opportunity-educate-to-liberate/. The conference will be recorded and live streamed here.

Funded in part by a Kenan Institute for Ethics Campus Grant.

Oct 122017
 
 October 12, 2017  Tagged with: ,

Ethical shoppers sipping an Ethos bottle of water support sanitation in Tanzania, buying a pair of TOMS shoes automatically donates a pair of shoes to “a child in need,” and mixing with Belvedere RED vodka contributes to the fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa.  Today’s marketplace is inundated with products supporting humanitarian causes that promise to give aid to beneficiaries, provide “good feelings” to consumers and promote the brands of corporations and humanitarian NGOs. The commodification of humanitarianism (turning people and causes into marketable things) is linked to the privatization of help (replacing public donors with private philanthropy) with significant and as of yet poorly understood consequences. Commodifying Compassion will introduce research exploring how “helping” has become a marketable commodity and how this impacts humanitarianism symbolically and materially.

The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics invites you to a panel discussion. Panelists include:

Lisa Ann Richey, Duke University and Roskilde University (Denmark), @BrandAid_World, “Implications of Commodifying Compassion on Business, Politics and Social Relations”

Alexandra Cosima Budabin, University of Dayton and Free University of Bolzano (Italy), @ABudabin,“Crafting Humanitarian Imaginaries: The Visual Story-Telling of Buy-One Give-One Marketing Campaigns”

Mie Vestergaard, Roskilde University (Denmark),“Private Business, Partnerships and Humanitarianism in Africa: ‘Win-Win – So Who Loses?’”

The panel will be moderated by

Catherine Mathers, International & Comparative Studies, Duke University

Follow Commodifying Compassion on Twitter  @CocoResearch

 

The event will be held on Thursday, April 12th from 4:30 – 6:00 pm in Room 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room) West Duke

Please RSVP to sk272@duke.edu by Monday, April 9 at noon.

 

Oct 072017
 
 October 7, 2017

Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics will host on March 5, 2018 a talk with Udi Greenberg, Associate Professor of History at Dartmouth College. His talk will explore the recent scholarly critique of religious freedom. Over the last decade or so, there has been a surge in left-leaning critique of religious liberty (essentially claiming it is a highly problematic and often oppressive concept). Much of this work has drawn on provocative Christian theologians, who have articulated similar ideas. His work looks at the process of this intellectual convergence, its values and limits, and what their implications for contemporary political theory could be.

Monday, March 5
3:00-5:00PM
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
West Duke Building, room 101

Udi Greenberg is an historian of Modern European thought, especially Europe’s engagement with the wider world.  His studies and teachings have concentrated on modern European history, political institution building, and religious thought. His first book, The Weimar Century: German Émigrés and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War (Princeton University Press, 2014), uncovers the intellectual, political, and institutional forces that shaped Germany’s reconstruction after World War II and the broader ideological genesis of the Cold War. By tracing the careers of influential German émigrés of diverse theoretical and political backgrounds, it claims that political ideas from Weimar Germany (1918-1933) were fundamental in molding the postwar order in Europe and the construction of American global hegemony. It was awarded the Council of European Studies’ 2016 Book Prize (for best first book in European studies published in 2014-2015). Greenberg is currently working on a second book-length project, tentatively titled From “Enemies of the Cross” to “Brethren in Faith”: Global Politics and the End of Europe’s Protestant-Catholic War, 1885-1965.

For more information, please contact Amber Diaz Pearson at amber.diaz@duke.edu

Aug 082017
 
 August 8, 2017  Tagged with:

The conference will begin with a public forum on the notion of “sanctuary” itself, featuring both scholars and activists who will trace sanctuary from its medieval origins, its 19th century mobilization by the abolitionists, and its reemergence in the last 30 years. This will be followed by a daylong workshop on religious humanitarianism, urban activism, and environmentalism, which will think about the ways that sanctuary might help us to make sense of how different faith communities are mobilizing in ways that are not simply “political.”

For more information, please click here.

Schedule:

Thursday, 8 February

“The Logic of Sanctuary: A Public Forum”

5-7 PM, Goodson Chapel, Duke University

Introduced and moderated by Elizabeth Bruenig (Washington Post)

Confirmed panelists: Diya Abdo (director of Guilford College’s Every Campus a Refuge project); A. Naomi Paik (Asian American Studies, Urbana-Champaign); Julie Peeples (Senior Pastor at Congregational UCC, Greensboro)

Friday, 9 February

Three panels, all held in the Ahmadieh Family Lecture Hall, Smith Warehouse, Duke University

9 AM: coffee and light breakfast

9:30-11:30

Panel 1: Civic Activism: Religion in Urban Spaces

Chaired by Joshua Friedman (Center for Jewish Studies, Duke)

Beth Baron (History, Graduate Center/ CUNY), “The Hospital as Sanctuary: Missionaries, Bodies, and Blessings”

Moshe Kornfeld (Danforth Center, Washington University, St. Louis), “Seeking Sanctuary in New Orleans”

Brooks Jessup (History, UC Berkeley), “Civic Dharma: Buddhist Activism and Urban Space in Semi-colonial China”

11:30-12:30

Lunch

12:30-2:30

Panel 2: Humanitarianism: Religion and the Body

Chaired by Luke Bretherton (Divinity School, Duke)

Julia Huang (Anthropology, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan), “Dying in Give: Buddhism and Cadaver Donations for Medical Science in Taiwan”

Carla Hung (Anthropology, Duke), “Lost in Translation: Sanctuary and Refugees in Rome, Italy”

Emanuel Schaueblin (Anthropology, Zurich), “Islamic interactions (mu‘āmalāt) as social protection in the occupied Palestinian territories”

2:30-3:00

Coffee break

3-5

Panel 3: Environmentalism: Religion and the Land

Chaired by Prasenjit Duara (History, Duke)

Catherine Flowers (FHI Practitioner in Residence), “Water and Faith in Lowndes County”

Ryan Juskus (Religious Studies, Duke), “The Cosmopolitics of Refuge: Associational Life in the Wake of So Much Damage”

Aaron Wolf (Geography, Oregon State), “The Spirit of Dialogue: Lessons from Faith Traditions in Transforming Water Conflicts”

For more information, contact James Chappel at james.chappel@duke.edu.

Sponsored by History, African and African American Studies (AAAS), Asian Pacific Studies Institute (APSI), Center for Jewish Studies, Divinity School, Duke Chapel, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute (DHRC@FHI), Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI), Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Nicholas School-Miscellaneous Events, and Religious Studies.

Aug 082017
 
 August 8, 2017

Thursday, February 8

12:00 noon – 1:30 pm

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, KIE 101 West Duke Building (East Campus)

Lunch served; to RSVP and to request parking, please email Hayden Hashimoto by 3:00 pm on Monday, February 5.

Meredith Edelman, who is currently a Lamb Postdoctoral Fellow with the Rethinking Regulation program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will be presenting on “Judging the Church: Legal Systems and Accountability for Clerical Sexual Abuse of Children” on Thursday, February 8 from 12 noon – 1:30 pm. Meredith’s research focuses on legal systems’ approaches to disputes arising out of child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy and compares the underlying theories, relevant doctrinal and procedural law, and practical realities of cases in canon law, tort law, bankruptcy law, and an Australian Royal Commission. The presentation will summarize conclusions and findings from her research.

In addition to being a Lamb Postdoctoral Fellow with the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Meredith is a PhD candidate with RegNet, the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University. Before beginning her studies, Meredith was a corporate restructuring lawyer in Los Angeles, California.

Aug 062017
 
 August 6, 2017

The conference will begin with a public forum on the notion of “sanctuary” itself, featuring both scholars and activists who will trace sanctuary from its medieval origins, its 19th century mobilization by the abolitionists, and its reemergence in the last 30 years. This will be followed by a daylong workshop on religious humanitarianism, urban activism, and environmentalism, which will think about the ways that sanctuary might help us to make sense of how different faith communities are mobilizing in ways that are not simply “political.”

For more information, please click here.

Schedule:

Thursday, 8 February

“The Logic of Sanctuary: A Public Forum”

5-7 PM, Goodson Chapel, Duke University

Introduced and moderated by Elizabeth Bruenig (Washington Post)

Confirmed panelists: Thavolia Glymph (Duke, History); Diya Abdo (director of Guilford College’s Every Campus a Refuge project); Julie Peeples (Senior Pastor, Congregational UCC, Greensboro NC)

Friday, 9 February

Three panels, all held in the FHI Garage, Smith Warehouse, Duke University

9 AM: coffee and light breakfast

Panel 1, 9:30-11:30: Humanitarianism: Religion and the Body

Confirmed panelists: C. Julia Huang (Anthropology, Santa Cruz); Carla Hung (Anthropology, Duke); Emmanuel Schaueblin (Anthropology, Zurich)

Chaired by Luke Bretherton (Divinity, Duke).

11:30-12:30: lunch

Panel 2, 12:30-2:30: Civic Activism: Religion in Urban Spaces

Confirmed panelists: Beth Baron (History, Graduate Center/ CUNY); Lila Berman (History, Temple); J. Brooks Jessup (Anthro, Berkeley).

Chaired by Adam Mestyan (History, Duke).

2:30-3:00: Coffee break

Panel 3, 3:00-5:00: Environmentalism: Religion and the Land

Confirmed panelists: Catherine Flowers (FHI Practitioner in Residence); Ryan Juskus (Religious Studies, Duke); Aaron Wolf (Geography, Oregon State).

Chaired by Prasenjit Duara (History, Duke).

Closing remarks and discussion, 5:00-5:30

For more information, contact James Chappel at james.chappel@duke.edu.

Sponsored by History, African and African American Studies (AAAS), Asian Pacific Studies Institute (APSI), Center for Jewish Studies, Divinity School, Duke Chapel, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute (DHRC@FHI), Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI), Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Nicholas School-Miscellaneous Events, and Religious Studies.

Jul 302017
 
 July 30, 2017

UPDATE: Read an article in the Duke Chronicle about the event and view a quote on Said@Duke

Join Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics for a conversation with Jennifer Bryson and Ismail Royer, “Insights Into Extremism: Experiences from a Former Guantanamo Bay Interrogator and a Convicted Jihadist.” We will be meeting on Tuesday, January 30 at 6:00pm in Sanford 04. This discussion will be moderated by AGS Council Co-Chair Matthew King. For more information, please contact Melanie Benson (melanie.benson@duke.edu).

Sponsored by the Duke University Program in American Grand Strategy, the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke Political Science and Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.