Spring Courses

 

Regulation-related Courses, Spring 2017

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

ECON 353: Financial Institutions
The operations of commercial and central banking and non-banking financial institutions and instruments in the United States, determination of monetary aggregates and interest rates, the financial impacts of Treasury operations, and the linkages from Federal Reserve actions to price level, employment, economic growth, and balance of payments objectives. Coverage of models of monetary economics (for example the Cagan money demand function, cash in advance models). The dynamics and real effects of inflation. Prerequisite: Economics 210D. Instructor: Kim

ECON 373: Corporate Finance
Major corporate decisions from the perspective of the firm with an emphasis on the interaction of the firm with financial markets: quantitative project evaluation for investment, choice between borrowing and issuing stock, dividend policy, organizational form (for example, mergers and acquisitions). Introduction to financial markets: asset pricing, issuing stocks, analyzing financial performance using relative value tools, and options. Prerequisites: Economics 372 or Economics 205D and Economics 208D. Instructor: Fullenkamp

ECON 375: Economics of Entrepreneurship
Duke-in-NY Financial Markets & Institutions Program. Application of microeconomics theory, such as game theory and industrial organization, to analyze business start-ups and their development. Focus on evaluation of the role of entrepreneurs in the macroeconomy, and the microeconomic performance of young businesses. The effects of government policies and economic fluctuations on entrepreneurs will be addressed, as well as an understanding of the organization and financial structure, development, and allocational decisions of growing entrepreneurial ventures. Instructor consent required. Prerequisite: Economics 201D. Instructor: Kim

ECON 471: Financial Markets and Investment
The structure and workings of financial markets. Topics include risk-return relationships, aspects of portfolio selection, the capital asset pricing model, the arbitrage pricing theory, fixed income analysis, and aspects of derivatives. Prerequisites: Economics 205D or Economics 372; and Statistical Science 111, 230, 130 or 250, or Mathematics 230 or 342. Instructor: Bollerslev

ENV 201: Integrating Environmental Science and Policy
Interaction between the natural and the social systems as they relate to the environment. Focus on ecological and earth system cycles, processes, and fundamental relationships. The environmental impact of human-induced change at the local, regional, and global levels. The role of technology and the policy process in determining how environmental problems evolve and are addressed. Use of ethical analysis to evaluate environmental tradeoffs. Use of case studies to integrate multiple disciplinary perspectives on environmental problems and to address issues of environmental justice. Not open to first year students. Prerequisite: Environment 102 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Bennear and Halpin

ENV 212: US Environmental Policy
An overview of the major environmental legislation in the United States. Topics include: air and water pollution, hazardous waste, agriculture, wildlife, and institutions. Political, economic, ethical, and scientific analysis. Open to juniors or seniors or by consent of instructor. Instructor: Albright

ETHICS 270/PHIL 270-01/ICS 271-01: Business Ethics: The Debate Over Corporate Social Responsibility
Debates about obligations of firms and business leaders over and above legal obligations. Examination of foundations and implications of corporate governance, corporate law, and the theory of the firm. Evaluation of challenges by supporters of stakeholder theory and corporate social responsibility. Instructor: Anomaly

ETHICS 590S.01/DECSCI 590S.01/ECON 390S.01/POLSCI 690S-1.01/PUBPOL 590S.01: Game Theory and Public Policy in Developing Economies
In this new special topics course, we use elementary game theory to study how repeated human interaction leads to formation of formal and informal institutions, which in turn leads to how a society moves into a vicious circle of poverty. We will also look at current government regulations on some sectors like healthcare, financial inclusion, social provisions, etc. and see how they impact the outcomes. Instructor: Pingali

ETHICS 590S.02/ENVIRON 590S.01/POLSCI 690S-2.01/PUBPOL 490S.04: Regulation & Emerging Technologies
This new special topics course introduces students to the main tools used to evaluate the impacts of new regulation, and then focuses specifically on new technologies such as fracking, precision medicine, robotics, artificial intelligence and human-machine interaction. How can we enable innovation without compromising privacy, security, civil rights, pluralism and other important public policy goals? Instructor: Renda

ETHICS 555S/POLSCI 555S: Politics of Market Competition
Course examines history and contemporary political, economic, and legal aspects of antitrust law and its enforcement. Explores evolution of antitrust thought and practice in the United States and Europe over past century, the recent rapid spread of competition laws, as well as domestic and international conflicts and cooperation over competition policy. Students will write original research papers on a related topic of their own choosing. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Park

HIST 305: History of international Financial and Monetary Crises
Course examines monetary/financial crises plaguing world since 16th century. Analyzes origin, unfolding, and impact of crises, debates generated by them, and formulation/implementation of policy measures. Attention to international implications/connections on European/Asian money supply, banking/credit systems; reaction to South Sea Bubble and John Law Credit Systems in numerous European nations; experiments with paper money in America; rise/demise of gold standard in 19th/20th century; currency and exchange rate problems of last three decades. Case studies will be selected and assigned according to participants’ interests. Prerequisites: Economics 205D and 210D. Instructor: Zanalda

HIST 345/PUBPOL 278: North American Environmental History
Historical roles of nature‚ as a cultural construct and a set of biological relationships‚ in shaping human choices in North America, from colonial times to the present. Special attention to historical origins of contemporary environmental politics, including the origins of wilderness; environmental justice movements; the changing politics of food, animal rights, and pollution; and tragedies of the commons, and the ethical challenges posed by global warming and population growth. Instructor: Peck

POLSCI 310/PUBPOL 301: Political Analysis of Public Policy-Making
Analysis of the political and organizational processes which influence the formulation and implementation of public policy. Alternative models. Prerequisite: Public Policy 155D. Instructor: Rose or Carnes

POLSCI 315: Political Economy of Financial Crises
Exploration of the political economy of financial crises with central theoretical emphasis on the role of ideas, institutions, and interests. Addresses causes of banking, currency and debt crises as well as their political consequences–both national and international. Geographical and historical coverage will be relatively broad, spanning historical cycles of financial crisis as well as specific boom and bust episodes involving Latin America, Asia, the United States, and countries of the Eurozone. No prerequisites. Instructor: Remmer

PUBPOL 288/ECON 355: International Trade
Topics include United States trade policies and protectionism, the North American Free Trade area, trade and economic relations with industrialized countries, policies toward developing countries and multilateral institutions, macroeconomic policy coordination, and relations with Europe. Prerequisites: Economics 201D. Instructor: Dix-Carneiro

PUBPOL 304: Economics of the Public Sector
Applies tools of intermediate micro economics to the public sector. Develops economic justifications for government intervention into the economy and examines and evaluates various government policies and programs including regulation of externalities, welfare programs, social security and other social insurance programs. Provides a solid foundation for applied benefit cost analysis. Analyzes tax policy and other forms of government financing, both at national and subnational levels. Prerequisites: Public Policy Studies 303D or Economics 201D. Instructor: Sexton or Jeuland or Ananat

PUBPOL 330: Global Health Ethics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Ethical issues of conducting research on or working with marginalized/stigmatized populations, using theoretical frameworks and case studies. Investigations of ethical choices made by multinational, national and local policymakers, clinicians and researchers, and their impact on individuals, families and communities. Emphasis on working with community partners to develop needs assessment programs. Topics include: differential standards of care; protection of human subjects; access to essential medicines; genetic information and confidentiality; pharmaceutical development; health information technology; placebo controlled trials; best outcomes vs distributive justice. Requires a background in Global Health. Instructor: Moe

PUBPOL 373S/ PJMS 373S: Intellectual Property
Survey and analysis of American intellectual property law and policy. Examines the impact of intangible assets–copyrights, trademarks, patents, and related rights and interests–on artistic expression, communication, and innovation. Emphasis on media-oriented issues including film, television, music, computer programs, and digital content, with special focus on the tension between the impulse to protect property interests and the need for an expansive public domain. Extensive readings in both case law and policy commentary. Instructor: Frey

SOCIOL 221: Eastern Europe: Markets/Media/Mafia
The progress of political, economic, and social transformations in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Topics include: The Historical Context for Reform in Eastern Europe, Economic Reform and its Effects, Market Evolution, Eastern European Societies in Transition: Education and Culture, Eastern European Societies in Transition: Corruption and the Mafia in Everyday Life, Media and Democracy in Eastern Europe, Establishing Law-Based States in Eastern Europe. Instructor: Newcity

SOCIOL 355-01: Organizations and Management
Dimensions and aspects of modern organizations and concepts and tools for analyzing them. Special attention to the impact of changing social and technological environments on the evolution of organizational structures and strategies and on issues related to business ethics. The structure and operation of organizations; how organizations are managed by analyzing processes of organizational decision making; business case studies as illustrative of the concepts and the analytical tools. Instructor: Yang

SOCIOL 361: U.S. Health Disparities
Introduction to how social factors influence health and well-being, with a particular focus on contemporary U.S. society. Topics include obesity, aging, socioeconomic disadvantage, access to health insurance, public health systems, the role of the media, and racial/ethnic and gender inequalities. The course will provide descriptive assessments of health inequalities and analytic examinations of the mechanisms through which social factors affect health. Instructor: Read

GRADUATE COURSES

ECON 656: International Monetary Economics
Financial aspects of growth and income determination, and macroeconomic policy in open economies. Applications to exchange rate determination, capital markets, fluctuations in the trade balance and current account, monetary and fiscal policies in open economies, currency crises, and monetary reform. Significant research component required. Economics MA students only.  Instructor: Kimbrough

ENVIRON 631: Energy Technology and Environmental Impacts
Efficiencies and environmental impacts of both new and established energy sources and conversion methods. Consideration of alternative energy technologies, including electricity generation by fossil fuels, nuclear, solar, wind and water; space heating and cooling by traditional methods and by solar; and transportation energy in automobiles, mass transit and freight. Environmental consequences of energy choices on local, national and global scales, including toxic emissions, greenhouse gases and resource depletion. Prerequisite: ENVIRON 330 or ENVIRON 711. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Johnson

ETHICS 590S.01/DECSCI 590S.01/POLSCI 690S-1.01/PUBPOL 590S.01: Game Theory and Public Policy in Developing Economies
In this new special topics course, we use elementary game theory to study how repeated human interaction leads to formation of formal and informal institutions, which in turn leads to how a society moves into a vicious circle of poverty. We will also look at current government regulations on some sectors like healthcare, financial inclusion, social provisions, etc. and see how they impact the outcomes. Instructor: Pingali

ETHICS 590S.02/ENVIRON 590S.01/POLSCI 690S-2.01: Regulation & Emerging Technologies
This new special topics course introduces students to the main tools used to evaluate the impacts of new regulation, and then focuses specifically on new technologies such as fracking, precision medicine, robotics, artificial intelligence and human-machine interaction. How can we enable innovation without compromising privacy, security, civil rights, pluralism and other important public policy goals? Instructor: Renda

LAW 205: Antitrust
This course covers the fundamentals of United States antitrust law as well as the underlying legal and economic theory. Topics include (i) horizontal restraints of trade such as cartels, oligopolies, and joint ventures; (ii) monopolization and the conduct of dominant firms; (iii) vertical restraints of trade between suppliers and customers such as resale price maintenance, territorial and customer restrictions, tying arrangements, exclusive dealing contracts, bundled and loyalty pricing; (iv) mergers; and (v) the intersection between antitrust and other areas of law, such as procedure, intellectual property, and the First Amendment. Instructor: Richman

LAW 336: Mergers and Acquisitions
The course will consider corporate mergers and acquisitions, the laws governing such transactions, and the process of initiating and completing a corporate acquisition. Pre or co-requisite: Business Associations (Law 210). Instruction: Krouse

LAW 341: FDA Law & Policy
Introduction to basic principles of food and drug laws and examination of how significant doctrines of constitutional, administrative, and criminal law have been elaborated and applied in the food and drug context. The United States Food and Drug Administration has a pervasive role in American society: it is often said that the agency regulates products accounting for twenty-five cents of every dollar spent by consumers. Exploration of the complex interplay of legal, ethical, policy, scientific, and political considerations that underlie the FDA’s regulatory authority, its policy-making, and its enforcement activity. Instructor: Williams

LAW 590: Risk Regulation in the US, Europe and Beyond
This seminar pursues an advanced, integrated analysis of the law, science and economics of societies’ efforts to assess and manage risks of harm to human health, safety, environment and security. The course will examine the regulation of a wide array of risks, such as those from food, drugs, medical care, automobiles, air travel, drinking water, air pollution, energy, climate change, finance, and terrorism (students may propose to research other risks as well). Across these diverse contexts, the course will explore the components of regulatory analysis: risk assessment, risk management (including the debate over “precaution” versus benefit-cost analysis), risk evaluations by experts vs. the public, and risk-risk tradeoffs. And it will explore options for institutional design and structure, including the interrelated roles of legislative, executive, and judicial functions; delegation and oversight; fragmentation and integration; and international cooperation. Instructors: Wiener

POLSCI 555S/ETHICS 555S: Politics of Market Competition
Course examines history and contemporary political, economic, and legal aspects of antitrust law and its enforcement. Explores evolution of antitrust thought and practice in the United States and Europe over past century, the recent rapid spread of competition laws, as well as domestic and international conflicts and cooperation over competition policy. Students will write original research papers on a related topic of their own choosing. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Park