Feb 212018
 

moral purpose
The call for submissions to the 2018 Kenan Moral Purpose Award essay competition is now open, with a deadline of 5pm, Friday, March 16. The Kenan Moral Purpose Award is given for the best undergraduate student essay on the role a liberal arts education plays in students’ exploration of the personal and social purposes by which to orient their future and the intellectual, emotional, and moral commitments that make for a full life.

More information and submission instructions here: http://kenan.ethics.duke.edu/students/kenan-moral-purpose-award/

 February 21, 2018
Jan 222018
 

Thursday, January 25 

12:00 noon – 1:30 pm 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, KIE 101 West Duke Building (on East Campus) 

Lunch served; to RSVP and to request parking, please email Hayden Hashimoto by 3:00 pm on Tuesday, January 23. 

Please join the Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE for a lunch seminar on Thursday, January 25 from 12:00pm-1:30pm with  Dr. Lori Bennear. Dr. Bennear will be speaking on her paper co-authored with Jonathan Wiener on “Instrument Choice for Adaptive Regulation.”

Regulation is often viewed as a one-time decision attempting to balance benefits, costs, and risks. But under uncertainty about future changes in science, technology, and society, such one-time decisions could be suboptimal.  An approach involving “adaptive regulation” which includes ongoing monitoring and a series of multiple sequential decisions could incorporate learning over time and improve outcomes.  This paper addresses several different ways that adaptive regulation might be pursued, to develop a typology and assessment of regulatory instrument choice for adaptive regulation.

Dr. Bennear is Co-Director of the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and Associate Director for Educational Programs at the Duke University Energy Initiative. She is also the Juli Plant Grainger Associate Professor of Energy Economics and Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment.

 

 January 22, 2018
Nov 032017
 

A new book edited by four Duke University professors examines how crises can reshape regulation and how we can learn to do better.  The book’s co-editors are Edward Balleisen, Professor of History and Duke’s Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies; Lori Bennear, the Juli Plant Grainger Associate Professor of Energy Economics and Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment; Kimberly Krawiec, the Kathrine Robinson Everett Professor of Law; and Jonathan Wiener, the Perkins Professor of Law, Professor of Environmental Policy, and Professor of Public Policy.

The book, Policy Shock: Recalibrating Risk and Regulation After Oil Spills, Nuclear Accidents, and Financial Crises, looks at responses to events in the U.S., Europe, and Japan, and assesses how the events affected laws, regulations, and institutions. (A special discount of 30% off the list price is available from Cambridge University Press until June 1, 2018, by entering the code:  Policy17 .)

For more information, see this story.

 November 3, 2017
Oct 012017
 

Lori Bennear, co-director of the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, has been appointed to a National Academy of Sciences committee tasked with reviewing the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Offshore Oil and Gas Operations Inspection Program.

The 13-member committee is comprised of a variety of scholars and experts who are charged with providing findings and recommendations to the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement regarding its inspection program and goals over the next decade. In 2015, 16 percent of U.S. production of crude oil and 7 percent of natural gas withdrawals happened in federal offshore waters. The U.S. Geologic Survey estimates that 30 percent of the world’s remaining oil and gas reserves lie in the Arctic ocean, a significant share of which could be accessible from offshore drilling in U.S. waters off the coast of Alaska.

“From an ethics standpoint, the work of this committee is critical to help improve regulations to balance the sometimes-conflicting values of energy security and energy independence, with environmental protection and worker safety,” Bennear said.

A leading voice in research and scholarship assessing effectiveness of environmental policies and regulation, Bennear was also recently named Duke’s inaugural Juli Plant Grainger Associate Professor of Energy Economics and Policy. Her primary appointment is associate professor of environmental economics and policy at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, with secondary faculty appointments at Duke’s Sanford School of Public Policy and its Economics Department, along with serving as co-director of Rethinking Regulation.

 October 1, 2017
Sep 202017
 

With seven engagements across two days at Duke, Kenan Institute for Ethics’ Practitioner-in-Residence Cass Sunstein presented to hundreds of students, faculty, staff and community members this week. He visited campus in collaboration with the Rethinking Regulation Program at Kenan and Duke Law School.

Sunstein, Harvard’s Robert Walmsley University Professor and founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School, shared a breadth of his regulatory expertise on a range of topics, from moral commitments in cost-benefit analysis to political division, food labeling and the process of impeachment. In addition to his work at Harvard, Sunstein previously acted as Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama Administration.

During talks at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Sunstein used topics of climate change and how people hold political beliefs to illustrate shifting ethical challenges in America. It can be hard to change minds, he said, because of how people can strongly hold to personal beliefs.

“Not liking something,” he noted, “pre-determines not believing.”

 September 20, 2017
Aug 152017
 

Alexander Martin, PPS ’19, served as a research assistant for the Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE in AY 2016-17. He has recently written a policy brief exploring the implications of recommendations made by Nicholas Ashford and KIE Senior Fellow Andrea Renda in their paper, “Aligning Policies for Low-Carbon Systemic Innovation in Europe” (CEPS 2016).

Read Martin’s policy brief, “Aligning Policies: Sustainable Development, Innovation & Decarbonization in Europe and Beyond” here.

 August 15, 2017
Aug 042017
 

This fall, Rethinking Regulation at the Kenan Institute for Ethics will host a new faculty member: Sarah Bloom Raskin, former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Raskin, who will act as a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke, comes to Kenan after serving at the Treasury from March 2014 to January 2017. In addition to research related to markets, regulation and public leadership, Raskin will offer guest lectures, advise students and participate in public events.

“We’re thrilled to to have Sarah working with Rethinking Regulation to provide a unique perspective on policies that shape markets in the U.S. and around the world,” said Suzanne Shanahan, the Nannerl O. Keohane Director of the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Among her priorities as second-in-command at the Treasury, Raskin emphasized solutions to enhance Americans’ shared prosperity, the resilience of financial infrastructures and consumer safeguards in the financial marketplace.

Jonathan B. Wiener, co-director of Kenan’s Rethinking Regulation, noted the breadth of expertise Raskin will bring to the program as it explores a variety of areas in research and practice.

“We are eagerly looking forward to working together with Sarah on questions on which she has extraordinary insight, such as how financial regulation can promote resilience to shocks, how financial regulatory systems can learn and adapt to change, and how conflict and cooperation can be managed among multiple regulatory agencies and oversight bodies,” said Wiener, who also serves as Perkins Professor of Law, Public Policy and Environmental Policy at Duke.

For more information about Raskin’s career and her appointment, which also includes the Global Financial Markets Center at Duke Law School, see this story on Duke Today.

 August 4, 2017
Jul 182017
 

The depth and reach of Duke’s focus to interdisciplinary education has grown tremendously in recent years, and in a new story from The Chronicle of Higher Education, the Kenan Institute for Ethics is highlighted as a core component of bringing that to reality.

In the special report, Breaking Down Barriers Across Disciplines, the higher ed news outlet cites support provided by Kenan in 2010 for Edward J. Balleisen’s then-new Rethinking Regulation program, which shifted how faculty could connect on campus.

The Rethinking Regulation Project, now under the leadership of Lori Bennear and Jonathan Wiener, has since supported a variety of graduate and undergraduate courses, research opportunities, a forthcoming book, Policy Shock and more.

“This could never have happened without the structure of the Institute,” Balleisen told the Chronicle of Higher Education. “Just assuming that any idea worth exploring is going to happen on its own is actually unrealistic.”

Read more about interdisciplinary education in this story.

 July 18, 2017
Jun 222017
 

In a newly released policy brief, Kenan Institute for Ethics’ Rethinking Regulation co-director Jonathan Wiener provides context on the complex web of climate change policy, written for the Climate Economics Chair in Paris.

Wiener’s essay, “Climate Policy in the New US Administration,” covers a range of topics related to the current status and possible future of U.S. climate policies in the wake of President Trump’s decision to withdraw the country from the Paris Agreement on climate change. Because America can’t officially withdraw until November 2020 at the earliest, there are still many things that could happen through legislation, litigation and social change.

“The future of climate policy is not determined by a single actor,” writes Wiener, William R. and Thomas L. Perkins Professor of Law at Duke Law School, Professor of Environmental Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment, and Professor of Public Policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy. “Analysts and activists may imagine optimal climate policy being made by a single benevolent decision maker, but the reality is that climate policy – for better or worse, and both internationally and domestically – involves actions by multiple decision makers with diverse instruments and interests.”

In addition to his brief, Wiener also took part in three-question Q&A with the Climate Economics Chair to provide additional context to the American withdrawal of the Paris Agreement, the role of the Environmental Protection Agency and the topic of a federal carbon tax.

For more information, read the policy brief and the Q&A.

 June 22, 2017
Jun 202017
 

The Kenan Institute for Ethics has opened a new library space as a resource for the Duke community.

Found in 102 West Duke Building, the library features more than 900 works of fiction and non-fiction, including published selections from all faculty affiliated with Kenan, selections from staff Ethics Books Clubs from across campus, as well as other scholars and writers. The library is named in honor of Robert and Sara Pickus, the parents of Noah Pickus, who served as Kenan’s director from 2007 to 2017.

Students, faculty and staff are encouraged to come by the Institute and visit the library. Beginning in the fall semester, books can be checked out by Duke community members. A searchable list of books can be found on the library’s webpage.

Along with books written by faculty, the library also includes a collection of books published as the capstone project for Kenan’s Ethics Certificate Program. The most recent release, “Gross! Ethical Issues Surrounding Disgust,” included chapters written by nine students and co-edited by Professor Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and recent graduate Sophie Katz. Previous Ethics Certificate publications explored drugs and addiction, crime and punishment, war and terrorism, and moral and political disagreement.

Have an ethics-focused non-fiction or fiction book you’d like to recommend for the library? Email kie@duke.edu.

 

 

 June 20, 2017