Nov 142017
 
Please join us for the next meeting of the
For a discussion on the theme of
“Corporations and Empire”
with
Andrew Fitzmaurice (History, University of Sydney)
“The expansion of international franchise in the late nineteenth century”
and
Steven Press (History, Stanford University)
“Sovereignty and Diamonds in Southern Africa, 1908-1920″
Friday, November 17, 11:30am to 1:30pm
Duke University School of Law
Room 4000
Lunch Served
Please RSVP here to register for the event and receive the pre-circulated papers
Please note as well the final event this semester of the Sawyer Seminar:
Friday, December 1, 11:30am, David Armitage (Harvard), “John Locke, Incorporated”
The Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law is supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and co-hosted by the Franklin Humanities Institute, School of Law, the Center for International and Comparative Law, and the Department of History. For more information, please contact Charles Bartlett
 November 14, 2017
May 202017
 

 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Nov. 27. Isak Tranvik will be presenting and seeking feedback regarding his research on “A Free Lunch? Democratic Theory and Central Bank Independence.”  Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, November 27
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 

 May 20, 2017
May 102017
 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Nov. 13. Tom Cinq-Mars is seeking suggestions regarding his proposal for an undergraduate course on “Extractive Economies” that is currently under review. Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, November 13
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 May 10, 2017
Apr 302017
 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on October 30. Ashton Merck, Ph.D. candidate in History, will present on “This is Just a Starter”: From Interstate Commerce to International Markets in Poultry, 1953-1963. Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, October 30
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 April 30, 2017
Apr 252017
 

Grad-Working-400Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Tuesday, April 25, 3:30PM in West Duke 08C.

Presenter: Ashton Merck
Title: The Political Economy of Chlorine-Washed Chicken: Regulating Farmers, Firms and Food Safety
Research Stage/Type: Dissertation Prospectus
Priority Areas for Feedback: This is the final version of my prospectus that has been turned in to my committee. As such, no line-item feedback is necessary, and reading the attached draft is not required to come to the meeting. The last two sections (conclusion and research challenges) deviate significantly from the disciplinary norm, and should foster the most productive discussion. I’d like to discuss big-picture questions like audience, clarity, and research strategies with the group, that would help me prepare for the defense and the research ahead.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Tuesday, April 25
3:30-5:00pm
West Duke 08C,
East Campus

 April 25, 2017
Apr 242017
 

Please join the Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE for a lunch seminar on Tuesday, October 24 11:30am-1pm with Dr. Matthew Johnson. Dr. Johnson will be speaking on “Does Cleaner Air Affect Worker Safety? How Firms Manage Multiple Regulatory Demands.”  Most firms in the U.S. are simultaneously required to comply with standards set by multiple regulatory agencies. While these agencies act to promote compliance with their own standards, rarely (if ever) do they consider how their actions might affect firms’ ability to comply with standards in other regulatory domains. Dr. Johnson’s research investigates a consequence of this siloed approach to regulation by analyzing whether and why such regulatory spillover effects may occur.

Dr. Johnson is a Research Scientist at the Sanford School of Public Policy.  His research seeks to understand how different regulations, policies, and shifts in the labor market have shaped working conditions in the U.S. Much of his current work focuses on the estimating the effects of health and safety regulations on firms and workers, and investigating what factors influence compliance with these regulations. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Boston University, and his B.A. in Economics and History from the University of California, Berkeley.

Please email Hayden Hashimoto to RSVP by 3:00 pm on Friday, October 20 for lunch, if you require a parking space, or if you would like to request a draft of Dr. Johnson’s paper.

Tuesday, October 24
11:30am-1:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
101 West Duke Building, East Campus

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 April 24, 2017
Apr 162017
 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on October 16. Maria Carnovale, Ph.D. candidate in Public Policy, will present on “Distribution of surplus in value chains in the presence platforms, hard regulation and consumer standards.” Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, October 16
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 April 16, 2017
Apr 032017
 

While utilitarians seek to maximize the sum total of individual well-being, “prioritarians” give extra weight to the well-being of those who are worse off. The “Prioritarianism in Practice” research network aims to develop the theory and application of prioritarianism, to the point that it can function as a full-blown policy assessment tool. The PiP network is organized around a series of research projects, each headed by one or more leading experts. The network is directed by Matthew Adler (adler@law.duke.edu) and Ole Norheim (Ole.Norheim@uib.no).

Friday, October 6, 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM
Saturday, October 7, 8:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Duke Law School, Room 3000

Full schedule


Friday, Oct. 6
8:00 – 8:30 AM
Breakfast

8:30 – 9:45 AM
Session 1: The Theory of Prioritarianism: Matt Adler (Duke University)

9:45 – 10:00 AM
Break

10:00 – 11:15 AM
Session 2: The Measurement of Social Progress: Koen Decancq (University of Antwerp) and Erik Schokkaert (University of Leuven)

11:15 – 11:30 AM
Break

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM
Session 3: Optimal Taxation: Matti Tuomala (University of Tampere) and Matt Weinzierl (Harvard University)

12:45 – 1:45 PM
Lunch

1:45 – 3:00 PM
Session 4: Health Care: Richard Cookson (University of York) and Ole Norheim (University of Bergen)

3:00 – 3:15 PM
Break

3:15 – 4:30 PM
Session 5: Environmental, Health and Safety Regulation: James Hammitt (Harvard University) and Nicolas Treich (Toulouse School of Economics)

Saturday, Oct. 7
8:00 – 8:30 AM
Breakfast

8:30 – 9:45 AM
Session 6: Climate Change: Marc Fleurbaey (Princeton University)

9:45 – 10:00 AM
Break

10:00 – 11:15 AM
Session 7: Education Policy: Erwin Ooghe (University of Leuven) and Mari Rege (University of Stavanger)

11:15 – 11:30 AM
Break

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM
Session 8: Equality of Opportunity: Francisco Ferreira (World Bank) and Vito Peragine (University of Bari)

12:45 – 2:00 PM
Session 9: Working Lunch – Skype Presentation
Empirical Research into Ethical Preferences: Alexander Cappelen (Norwegian School of Economics) and Bertil Tungodden (Norwegian School of Economics)

2:00 – 3:00 PM
Wrap-up Conversation: Discussion of Next Steps

 April 3, 2017
Mar 192017
 

Rethinking Regulation at the Kenan Institute for Ethics will host two events on Tuesday, Sept. 19 featuring Cass Sunstein, professor at Harvard University and former Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama Administration.

Public sessions will be held in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101) in the West Duke Building on East Campus:

9:30 to 11:30 a.m.

Sunstein will discuss his book, “#Republic: Divided Democracy in the Age of Social Media,” on political fragmentation, polarization, and extremism—and what can be done about it. Sunstein will also talk about a recent paper, “How People Update Beliefs about Climate Change: Good News and Bad News,” which showed that people on both sides of the ongoing debate over climate change tend to change beliefs in response to new information in ways that widen, rather than reduce, polarization. RSVP here.

2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Sunstein will discuss his paper, “On Mandatory Labeling, With Special Reference to Genetically Modified Foods.”In his article, Sunstein evaluates four competing approaches to assess the costs and benefits of mandatory labeling, and applies them to debates over genetically modified foods. RSVP here.

For more information about Sunstein’s visit, see this story.

 March 19, 2017
Feb 282017
 

Join the Kenan Institute for Ethics for its annual celebration kicking off the new academic year. Enjoy food and reconnect with friends after a summer away from campus. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. and will be held on the lawn outside the West Duke Building on East Campus.

Students, faculty, staff and their families are welcome.

 February 28, 2017