Feb 132018
 
  
screen-shot-2016-10-24-at-3-02-35-pm
Thursday, February 22  
12:00 noon – 1:30 pm 
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, 
KIE 101 West Duke Building (on East Campus) 
 
Lunch served; please RSVP to Hayden Hashimoto by 1:00 pm on Tuesday, February 20. 
 
Speculation about the participation of Russian athletes accused of doping and cross-border political tensions have overshadowed the lead-up to the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games. With regard to doping in particular, a Court of Arbitration in Sport (CAS) decision overturned 28 lifetime bans a week before the start of the Olympic Games, prompting appeals by some athletes to compete and questions about the rights of so-called “clean” athletes. 

This presentation considers the latest developments in the Russian doping saga alongside other recent events that point to wider tensions between assertions of athletes’ rights and governing sports bodies’ attempts to ensure fair play in competition. In doing so, it contextualizes the regulatory landscape and explains how current rules emerged in a way that disproportionately shifts the risks and repercussions of noncompliance onto athletes. Accordingly, there are limited formal measures designed to hold organizations accountable for enabling corrupt or unethical conduct. Following a discussion of contemporary examples, the conclusion offers a reflection on how the current regulatory regime in international sport renders some issues of fair play visible-in fact, arguably hypervisible-while veiling others. Recent challenges, many of them put forth in the name of athletes’ rights, aid in illuminating some of these concerns.
 
Dr. Kathryn (Kate) Henne is an interdisciplinary socio-legal researcher. She is the Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Biogovernance, Law and Society at the University of Waterloo, Canada, where she is currently Assistant Professor of Sociology and Legal Studies and directs the Law and Society Emerging Research (LaSER) Laboratory. She is also Associate Professor of Regulation and Governance and Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award Fellow at the Australian National University.
 February 13, 2018
Jan 262018
 

Thursday, February 8

12:00 noon – 1:30 pm

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, KIE 101 West Duke Building (East Campus)

Lunch served; to RSVP and to request parking, please email Hayden Hashimoto by 3:00 pm on Monday, February 5.

Meredith Edelman, who is currently a Lamb Postdoctoral Fellow with the Rethinking Regulation program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will be presenting on “Judging the Church: Legal Systems and Accountability for Clerical Sexual Abuse of Children” on Thursday, February 8 from 12 noon – 1:30 pm. Meredith’s research focuses on legal systems’ approaches to disputes arising out of child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy and compares the underlying theories, relevant doctrinal and procedural law, and practical realities of cases in canon law, tort law, bankruptcy law, and an Australian Royal Commission. The presentation will summarize conclusions and findings from her research.

In addition to being a Lamb Postdoctoral Fellow with the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Meredith is a PhD candidate with RegNet, the School of Regulation and Global Governance at the Australian National University. Before beginning her studies, Meredith was a corporate restructuring lawyer in Los Angeles, California.
 January 26, 2018
Jan 232018
 
Monday, January 29
4:30pm-6:00pm (reception following)
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, KIE 101 West Duke Building (on East Campus) 
Refreshments provided at reception following the workshop; please RSVP to Hayden Hashimoto by 3:00 pm on Friday, January 26.
 

Dr. Atsuo Kishimoto of Osaka University will be visiting Duke University on Monday, January 29 from 4:30pm-6:00pm to speak about “The Gap Between Science and Policy in Setting Environmental Standards in Japan: Challenges and Progress.” Dr. Kishimoto’s work focuses on environmental policy and he has assisted the Japanese government in developing a regulatory impact assessment system. The seminar will be followed by a reception.
Dr. Atsuo Kishimoto is a professor of the Institute of Datability Science at the Osaka University. He obtained his Ph.D. in economics from Kyoto University, and then worked for the National Institute for Advanced Science and Technology (AIST) for 15 years. His research covers risk assessment and socio-economic analysis of multiple areas. He is also a member of several advisory bodies to the Government of Japan, such as Radiation Council and Policy Evaluation Council.
 January 23, 2018
Jan 222018
 

Thursday, January 25 

12:00 noon – 1:30 pm 

Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, KIE 101 West Duke Building (on East Campus) 

Lunch served; to RSVP and to request parking, please email Hayden Hashimoto by 3:00 pm on Tuesday, January 23. 

Please join the Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE for a lunch seminar on Thursday, January 25 from 12:00pm-1:30pm with  Dr. Lori Bennear. Dr. Bennear will be speaking on her paper co-authored with Jonathan Wiener on “Instrument Choice for Adaptive Regulation.”

Regulation is often viewed as a one-time decision attempting to balance benefits, costs, and risks. But under uncertainty about future changes in science, technology, and society, such one-time decisions could be suboptimal.  An approach involving “adaptive regulation” which includes ongoing monitoring and a series of multiple sequential decisions could incorporate learning over time and improve outcomes.  This paper addresses several different ways that adaptive regulation might be pursued, to develop a typology and assessment of regulatory instrument choice for adaptive regulation.

Dr. Bennear is Co-Director of the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and Associate Director for Educational Programs at the Duke University Energy Initiative. She is also the Juli Plant Grainger Associate Professor of Energy Economics and Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment.

 

 January 22, 2018
Nov 142017
 
Please join us for the next meeting of the
For a discussion on the theme of
“Corporations and Empire”
with
Andrew Fitzmaurice (History, University of Sydney)
“The expansion of international franchise in the late nineteenth century”
and
Steven Press (History, Stanford University)
“Sovereignty and Diamonds in Southern Africa, 1908-1920″
Friday, November 17, 11:30am to 1:30pm
Duke University School of Law
Room 4000
Lunch Served
Please RSVP here to register for the event and receive the pre-circulated papers
Please note as well the final event this semester of the Sawyer Seminar:
Friday, December 1, 11:30am, David Armitage (Harvard), “John Locke, Incorporated”
The Sawyer Seminar on Corporations and International Law is supported by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and co-hosted by the Franklin Humanities Institute, School of Law, the Center for International and Comparative Law, and the Department of History. For more information, please contact Charles Bartlett
 November 14, 2017
May 202017
 

 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Nov. 27. Isak Tranvik will be presenting and seeking feedback regarding his research on “A Free Lunch? Democratic Theory and Central Bank Independence.”  Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, November 27
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 

 May 20, 2017
May 102017
 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Nov. 13. Tom Cinq-Mars is seeking suggestions regarding his proposal for an undergraduate course on “Extractive Economies” that is currently under review. Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, November 13
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 May 10, 2017
Apr 302017
 

Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on October 30. Ashton Merck, Ph.D. candidate in History, will present on “This is Just a Starter”: From Interstate Commerce to International Markets in Poultry, 1953-1963. Light refreshments provided.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Hayden Hashimoto (hayden.hashimoto@duke.edu) with any questions.

Monday, October 30
2:00-3:00pm
107F West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 April 30, 2017
Apr 252017
 

Grad-Working-400Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Tuesday, April 25, 3:30PM in West Duke 08C.

Presenter: Ashton Merck
Title: The Political Economy of Chlorine-Washed Chicken: Regulating Farmers, Firms and Food Safety
Research Stage/Type: Dissertation Prospectus
Priority Areas for Feedback: This is the final version of my prospectus that has been turned in to my committee. As such, no line-item feedback is necessary, and reading the attached draft is not required to come to the meeting. The last two sections (conclusion and research challenges) deviate significantly from the disciplinary norm, and should foster the most productive discussion. I’d like to discuss big-picture questions like audience, clarity, and research strategies with the group, that would help me prepare for the defense and the research ahead.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Tuesday, April 25
3:30-5:00pm
West Duke 08C,
East Campus

 April 25, 2017
Apr 242017
 

Please join the Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE for a lunch seminar on Tuesday, October 24 11:30am-1pm with Dr. Matthew Johnson. Dr. Johnson will be speaking on “Does Cleaner Air Affect Worker Safety? How Firms Manage Multiple Regulatory Demands.”  Most firms in the U.S. are simultaneously required to comply with standards set by multiple regulatory agencies. While these agencies act to promote compliance with their own standards, rarely (if ever) do they consider how their actions might affect firms’ ability to comply with standards in other regulatory domains. Dr. Johnson’s research investigates a consequence of this siloed approach to regulation by analyzing whether and why such regulatory spillover effects may occur.

Dr. Johnson is a Research Scientist at the Sanford School of Public Policy.  His research seeks to understand how different regulations, policies, and shifts in the labor market have shaped working conditions in the U.S. Much of his current work focuses on the estimating the effects of health and safety regulations on firms and workers, and investigating what factors influence compliance with these regulations. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Boston University, and his B.A. in Economics and History from the University of California, Berkeley.

Please email Hayden Hashimoto to RSVP by 3:00 pm on Friday, October 20 for lunch, if you require a parking space, or if you would like to request a draft of Dr. Johnson’s paper.

Tuesday, October 24
11:30am-1:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room
101 West Duke Building, East Campus

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 April 24, 2017