Dec 222016
 

2016Reg-Graphic
The Rethinking Regulation Program at KIE is hosting its Annual Symposium May 22. This year’s conference is spearheaded by 2016-17 Lamb Regulatory Fellow Vishy Pingali, focusing on regulation and access to pharmaceuticals in the developing world. Discussion will center on the 2016 report of the UN Commission on Human Rights on Access to Medicines. Governments in developing economies often grapple with the absence of mature insurance markets, so patients often pay for medication out of pocket. Expensive, novel medicines are then out of reach for the majority of the population. Can these governments develop a regulatory regime that facilitates payment for these prescriptions?

Check back for full schedule of panels and speakers.

Monday, May 22
101 West Duke Building,
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room

 December 22, 2016
Nov 172016
 

For its April 17 Monday Seminar Series, Kenan Institute for Ethics welcomes Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Professor of Social Medicine and Associate Director of the Center for Bioethics at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s Department of Social Medicine. She is also Research Professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Lyerly will present “Ethics, Pregnancy and the Race for a Zika Vaccine.” She is currently co-principle investigator on a Wellcome Trust funded project to advance equitable inclusion of pregnant women research on Zika and other public health emergencies.  Additionally, she is principle investigator on the NIH-funded PHASES Project to advance equitable inclusion of pregnant women in HIV research, and, along with Ruth Faden and Maggie Little, she co-founded the Second Wave Initiative, a project aimed at addressing women’s health needs during pregnancy through responsible inclusion of pregnant women (and their interests) in biomedical research.

Over her career Lyerly has addressed a range of topics in reproductive medicine, including stem cell research and frozen embryo disposition, miscarriage, maternal-fetal surgery, and vaginal birth after cesarean. She has recently completed a book, A Good Birth, reporting the findings of the Good Birth Project, aimed at describing what constitutes a “good birth” from the perspectives of birthing women themselves.

After earning a bachelor’s degree at Dartmouth College, she received master’s degrees at Duke and Georgetown University.

Lyerly will present from noon to 1:30 p.m. April 17 in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke Building Room 101. Lunch will be provided and those interested in attending must RSVP by emailing Bashar Alobaidi at bashar.alobaidi@duke.edu.

The Monday Seminar Series, hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics, fosters a interdisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students from across the University to discuss cutting edge research in ethics broadly conceived. For more information and upcoming speakers, visit the series website.

 November 17, 2016
Oct 182016
 

ed balleisan-fraud book-coverThe Duke community is invited to join the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics to celebrate the launch of Edward J. Balleisen’s new book: Fraud: An American History from Barnum to Madoff (Princeton University Press, 2017) from 5:30 to 7 p.m. April 18 in the Thomas Reading Room at Lilly Library. Balleisen will discuss the book with Sam Buell, followed by Q&A with the audience, a book signing, and a reception.

Edward J. Balleisen is the Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies and Associate Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. His research and writing explores the historical intersections among law, business, politics, and policy in the modern United States, with a growing focus on the origins, evolution, and impacts of the modern regulatory state. He has pursued a number of collaborative projects with historians and other social scientists who study regulatory governance in industrialized and industrializing societies. He has also started an oral history project that examines regulatory policy-making, which involves extensive collaboration with Duke undergraduate and graduate students. From 2010 through 2015, he directed the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Samuel W. Buell is the Bernard M. Fishman Professor of Law at Duke University. His research and teaching focus on criminal law and on the regulatory state, particularly regulation of corporations and financial markets. He is the author of Capital Offenses:  Business Crime and Punishment in America’s Corporate Age (W.W. Norton & Co., 2016).  His recent scholarship explores the conceptual structure of white collar offenses, the problem of behaviors that evolve to avoid legal control, and the treatment of the corporation and the white collar offender in the criminal justice system. He is a member of the American Law Institute, has testified before the United States Senate and the United States Sentencing Commission on matters involving the definition and punishment of corporate crimes, and has delivered recent invited lectures in Australia, China, and Taiwan.

Event details:

  • 5:30 to 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 18
  • Thomas Reading Room, Lilly Library (2nd Floor)
  • East Campus

Parking on East Campus is free and open to the public beginning at 5 p.m. on weekdays.

 October 18, 2016
Oct 112016
 

Grad-Working-400Graduate students are invited to the next meeting of the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group on Tuesday, April 11, in Rubenstein Hall 242 (West Campus). Lauren Czaplicki, Ph.D. Candidate in Civil and Environmental Engineering, will present.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Tuesday, April 11
3:30-5:00pm
Rubenstein Hall 242,
West Campus

 October 11, 2016
Sep 282016
 

Grad-Working-400Kenan Graduate Scholars and Kenan Graduate Affiliates of Rethinking Regulation are invited to the next meeting of the Graduate Student Working Group on March 28. The group will discuss the new Rethinking Regulation blog project and plans for the rest of the semester.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Tuesday, March 28
3:30-5:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
101 West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 September 28, 2016
Sep 232016
 

Grad-Working-400All are invited to join the Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group for a roundtable discussion over lunch on Thursday, March 23, 11:30-1:00pm. The faculty roundtable will open with remarks on the future of regulatory policy and the Trump administration, followed by Q&A and open discussion.

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Thursday, March 23
11:30am-1:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
101 West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 September 23, 2016
Sep 072016
 

Grad-Working-400Kenan Graduate Scholars and Kenan Graduate Affiliates of Rethinking Regulation are invited to the next meeting of the Graduate Student Working Group on March 7. Anna Johns Hrom, JD (PhD Candidate in History), will present a dissertation chapter: “Tort Retort: The Business Lobby Redefines Tort Reform in Alabama.”

The Rethinking Regulation Graduate Student Working Group meets monthly to present research, discuss interdisciplinary regulatory scholarship, and analyze contemporary regulatory policy issues. Please contact Mercy DeMenno (mercy.demenno@duke.edu), Graduate Program Coordinator for the RR-GSWG, with any questions.

Tuesday, March 7
3:30-5:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room,
101 West Duke Building (East Campus)

Using the East-West bus is advised for those traveling from West Campus.

 September 7, 2016
Aug 282016
 

Climate Negotiations After the Paris Agreement: Sustaining the Momentum?

Jennifer Haverkamp, former U.S. Ambassador and Special Representative for Environment and Water Resources at the State Department, will discuss how key steps since Paris are reshaping global environmental governance, including last year’s negotiations in Marrakech, as well as new accords under the International Civil Aviation Organization and the Montreal Protocol. Duke students will discuss their experiences as university delegates in Paris and Marrakech, as well as the opportunity to participate in Duke’s next U.N. Climate Change Negotiations Practicum team in Fall 2017. Sponsored by: Duke to the UNFCCC Bass Connections Course and the Duke Environmental Law and Policy Forum. For more information please contact Jeremy Iloulian at jeremy.iloulian@duke.edu.

 August 28, 2016
Aug 282016
 

Unfinished Business: Banking in the Shadows, Feb. 28.

Eight years have passed since the “Great Financial Crisis.” The efforts of legislators and regulators have significantly helped protect the safety and soundness of our large banks. Yet the system remains vulnerable. Highly leveraged and interconnected financial firms continue to rely on panic-prone funding structures, posing a clear risk of contagious “runs.” Today, it is not the heavily regulated commercial banks that are the main source of concern. Rather, it is the lightly regulated non-bank financial institutions that are deeply reliant on uninsured short-term debt that pose significant risk. Please join us as we hear from the Volcker Alliance’s Michael Bradfield, Gaurav Vasisht, and former UNC President, Tom Ross, who will discuss the Alliance’s recent report that identifies areas of vulnerability, and options to enhance the stability of the financial system. Food and refreshments will be served. Sponsored by Global Financial Markets Center. For more information, please contact Lee Reiners at reiners@law.duke.edu.

 August 28, 2016
Aug 232016
 

Conv.HR_-300x225During the 2016 election, Donald Trump routinely highlighted the economic suffering faced by American workers, critiquing deinstrialization and arguing that trade agreements played a major role in the loss of American manufacturing jobs. Despite this, he has not indicated any interest in making trade agreements fairer by raising labor standards in foreign countries, as critics of international trade agreements, as well as some human rights proponents, have advocated.

What kinds of changes can we expect to the governance of labor, both domestically and in international agreements under the Trump administration? Can we expect anything more than a new era of repression, or does Trump’s rejection of multinational trade agreements also present opportunities for either labor or human rights advocates? What strategies might working people, particularly those on the margins in the U.S. and elsewhere, employ to challenge repressive conditions they face at work given the rise of the anti-regulatory Right? What new regimes of governance might emerge?

Join us on February 23rd for a discussion of these questions. Panelists include:

  • Cynthia Estlund (NYU Law School, Catherine A. Rein Professor of Law)
  • Kevin Kolben (Rutgers Business School, Investigative Journalist)
  • Moderated by Peter Pihos (Duke Thomspon Writing Program, Lecturing Fellow)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

The event will be held on Thursday, February 23 2017 at 4:30-6:00pm, located in West Duke, Room 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room).

Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth by Thursday, February 20th at noon.

 August 23, 2016