Nov 162017
 
 November 16, 2017

Blaine Bookey, Co-Legal Directorof the Center for Gender & Refugee Studies (CGRS) at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, will give a talk on “Protecting Asylum-Seeking Women and Children Under Trump,” which will be moderated by Aya Fujimura-Fanselow, Senior Legal Fellow and Supervising Attorney of Duke Law’s International Human Rights Clinic.  Bookey will discuss efforts nationally to protect women and children in an ever-increasingly hostile environment for asylum seekers in the United States. She will cover recent migration patterns of women and children, the conditions they are fleeing, and the legal and procedural barriers to protection at each stage for those seeking safe haven. Finally, she will highlight the advocacy and litigation of CGRS and other partners that aims to ensure the United States lives up to its domestic and international obligations to the persecuted.

This is part of the Human Rights in Practice Series, which is organized by the International Human Rights Clinic and Center for International and Comparative Law. Co-sponsors include the Coalition against Gendered Violence, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Human Rights Law Society, Immigrant and Refugee Project, International Law Society, and Women Law Students Association. Lunch will be provided.

For more information, please see the event website or contact Ali Prince.
Oct 242017
 
 October 24, 2017

Darrin Zammit LupiJoin Malta-based photojournalist and humanitarian Darrin Zammit Lupi for lunch, to discuss the impact of documentary photography and media advocacy on behalf of vulnerable populations, notably migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

Darrin Zammit Lupi started his photography career with The Malta Independent in 1992, but decided to turn freelance shortly afterwards. After a year’s training with the National Council for the Training of Journalists in the UK, he undertook foreign assignments in Albania and war-torn former Yugoslavia, winning the BPC Award to Journalists 1993 for his Albanian work.  In recent years, he covered the South-East Asia tsunami tragedy, the refugee crisis during the war in Kosovo, issues related to the Millennium Development Goals (with a particular emphasis on HIV/AIDS) in various parts of Africa, the earthquake in L’Aquila, Italy, the war in Libya, the Costa Concordia disaster and several other national and international assignments.  His work for Reuters has been published in newspapers, magazines, books and online worldwide, and has featured in publications such as TIME, Newsweek, The New York Times, The Sunday Times, The Guardian, Paris Match, Der Spiegel and others.

In late 2014, he published his book ‘Isle Landers’, covering a decade’s work on irregular immigration and asylum seekers in the Mediterranean.

He holds a Masters Degree with Distinction in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography from the University of the Arts, London.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Darrin Zammit Lupi
WHEN: Friday, November 3, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Oct 242017
 
 October 24, 2017
On November 6, Stephen Metcalf–investigative journalist, Slate columnist and critic at large–will join The Role of Markets in Ethical Global Development Project at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and Anne Maria Makhulu to talk about the neoliberal roots of current populism.

 

The Role of Markets Project is led by Kenan Senior Fellows Michaeline Crichlow and Dirk Philipsen and explores the inherently ethical dimensions of social and economic relations, both between citizens and in their relationship to the economy and the state. What, then, do we mean by “markets?” What role can and should markets play in addressing pressing concerns of ethical development such as climate change, global conflict, and inequality? Are there ways to imagine and conceptualize markets that provide alternatives to the currently hegemonic neoliberal model?

 

The talk will begin at 12pm in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (West Duke 101) and will be followed by a workshop with Stephen Metcalf from 1:30-3:00pm in West Duke 08C.
Oct 242017
 
 October 24, 2017

Join Slate magazine’s Critic-at-Large Stephen Metcalf to talk about how culture shapes society and vice-versa, how neoliberalism led to the Trump presidency and the role and responsibility of journalists in the age of Trump. Have lunch with him to get a different and involved perspective!

Stephen Metcalf attended Phillips Exeter Academy but, “three weeks shy of graduation, was asked by the school administration, in no uncertain terms, to leave.” He then matriculated at Wesleyan University, later earning a master’s degree from the University of Virginia. After spending some time working on a Ph.D. in the English graduate program at Yale University, he moved to New York City where he worked as a speechwriter for Hillary Clinton, during her first Senate campaign, and a freelance writer. Subsequently, he joined Slate as a staff writer, where he writes the magazine’s Dilettante column and serves as host of the magazine’s culture podcast.

Metcalf’s work has appeared in The New York Times, the New York Observer and New York (magazine).

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions, exclusively for currently enrolled Duke undergraduate students, featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up here.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Stephen Metcalf
WHEN: Tuesday, November 7, from 12pm to 1pm
WHERE: Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.

Oct 232017
 
 October 23, 2017

What does it mean to be a “good” physician?

What sorts of moral formation (or deformation?) can take place in medical school education? What does it mean to see medicine as a “vocation” and how does the practice of medicine have a moral dimension to it? These are hard, important questions that anyone planning on medical school (or already in medical school) should give time to contemplate. Please join us for a public panel in which four experts from medical schools around the country will weigh in on these and other questions.

Panelists include:

  • Dr. Farr Curlin, Duke School of Medicine
  • Dr. Lydia Dugdale, Yale School of Medicine
  • Dr. Warren Kinghorn, Duke School of Medicine
  • Dr. John Yoon, University of Chicago School of Medicine

The talk will be held on November 8th at 5 pm in French Science 2237.