Mar 072017
 
 March 7, 2017  Tagged with: ,  Comments Off on Entrepreneurship competition teaches students value of connecting with refugees

Sherry Feng, center, goes over a presentation for Sawiana Enterprises with team members Jason Wang, left, and Saheel Chodavadia, right. The trio was one of two Duke teams to compete at the Hult Prize competition in Boston March 2 to 5.

For Duke students Saheel Chodavadia and Julie Williams, a recent competition has further spurred interest to help refugees around the world after Kenan Institute for Ethics’ programs first got them thinking globally.

The pair were part of two Duke teams at the Hult Prize competition, a collegiate social entrepreneurship contest held March 2 to 5 in Boston. During their time at the event, Chodavadia and Williams networked with peers from a variety of different countries, heard from leaders of non-profit organizations and shared their own ideas for how technology has the potential to positively impact vulnerable populations.

The Hult Prize Foundation, which provides start-up funding for its contest, had teams present ideas to help “restore the rights and dignity of 10 million refugees by 2022.”

“Being surrounded by so much knowledge and so many creative solutions, it shows you that there are incredible people ready to do great things in the world,” said Williams, whose team, REconomy, built an app to better integrate resettled refugees into new economies.

REconomy’s idea came after Williams and teammate Sanjeev Dasgupta traveled to Jordan in 2016 with the Kenan Institute’s DukeImmerse program to work with refugees. Chodavadia, who has participated in Kenan’s Refugee Project and Focus and MASTERY programs, was part of Sawiana Enterprises, a team working to create an app to connect refugees to share skills, like cooking, and interests, like starting a business

While a team from Rutgers University won top prize at the competition, Williams and Chodavadia said the lasting impact from the trip will be the way they think about how they can help those in need elsewhere in the world. A big part of that, they said, is having more face-to-face time with refugee populations to understand what daily needs are like to better tailor solutions to help them.

“Based on what they say and what you learn, you can find a solution to empower them, not just help them,” Chodavadia said. “Whenever I do something at Duke, I want to do it because I see a problem. With refugees, I want to help them because they tell me what their problem is.”

Williams echoed the sentiment, noting that interactions she had with refugees through DukeImmerse taught her about the need for sustainable solutions, not just quick fixes.

“What can we provide,” she said, “so that people can provide for themselves.”

Despite not winning the Hult Prize competition, both the REconomy and Sawiana Enterpreises teams will continue to seek funding for their projects.

Mar 012017
 
 March 1, 2017  Tagged with:  Comments Off on Kenan programs inspire technology to help refugees

Julie Williams shared this image of children as part of a research journal from her 2016 DukeImmerse experience in Jordan.

Through a variety of unique opportunities and programming, the Kenan Institute for Ethics has inspired several undergraduate students participating in a national competition focused on helping refugees around the world.

From March 2 to 5, two teams in the Hult Prize competition, a leading collegiate social entrepreneurship contest, will have a distinct Kenan feel after experiences through DukeImmerse, MASTERY and others encouraged students to think globally. The Hult Prize Foundation, which provides start-up funding for its contest winners, has asked students to present on solutions to build “sustainable, scalable social enterprises that restore the rights and dignity of 10 million refugees by 2022.”

Kenan is funding the trip to Boston for REconomy, a team of four Duke students who have built an app that can help integrate resettled refugees into new economies. Inspiration for the app came from experiences through the Institute’s DukeImmerse program, which provided team members Julie Williams and Sanjeev Dasgupta the chance to work with refugees in Jordan in 2016. The goal of REconomy is to allow sellers to post goods and services with a price, location and contact information to formalize interactions among refugee settlements.

Kenan’s 2017 DukeImmerse team of students is currently testing the app to provide feedback.

Another Duke team in the Hult competition  has a Kenan connection through Saheel Chodavadia, who is part of Sawiana Enterprises, which is working to create an app to connect refugees to share skills, like cooking, and interests, like starting a business. Chodavadia has taken part in the Institute’s Focus program, Refugee Project, and has tutored local refugees through Kenan’s MASTERY program. This summer, he’ll participate in Kenan’s DukeEngage Dublin trip.

For more information about the teams and their projects, see this Duke Today story.

Nov 172016
 
 November 17, 2016  Comments Off on Institute Launches New Refugee Program Hub

KRP_Launch400_revThe Kenan Institute for Ethics launched the Kenan Refugee Project website with an event on December 2nd.

In addition to housing information about the Institute’s portfolio of refugee-related programming in one place, the site features easily accessible information about the status of refugees around the world; refugee oral histories, and archived editions of the weekly InFlux newsletter.

Click here to visit the new Kenan Refugee Project website.

Oct 202016
 
 October 20, 2016  Comments Off on Deadline to apply to DukeImmerse 2017, Oct. 25

Immerse 2016UpdateExplore the dynamics of the current crisis and the challenges it poses for refugees, host communities and international law. Work with refugees locally and internationally. 4 courses. 4 weeks in Jordan. A life-changing experience.

Courses listed in AMES, CULANTH, ETHICS, ICS, POLSCI, and SOCIOL. Codes include ALP, CCI, CZ, IE, QS, R, SS, AND W.

The deadline to apply to DukeImmerse: Deconstructing/Reconstructing the Refugee Experience is Tuesday, October 25th at 5pm.

Click here to download the application.

Please direct questions to Suzanne Shanahan.

Sep 272016
 
 September 27, 2016  Comments Off on KIE Campus Grant applications considered on a rolling basis

campus-grants-400The Campus Grants program allows members of the Duke community to incorporate ethics into their own work. Grants of up to $500 are available to all members of the Duke community—students, faculty, and staff—to support initiatives that promote ethical or moral reflection, deliberation, and dialogue at Duke and beyond.

We welcome diverse perspectives and submissions from organizations and individuals in all areas of the University and the Medical Center. Campus Grant funding provides support for speakers, workshops, meetings, curriculum development, publications, organizational collaborations, and other activities. Travel grants for attending conferences or other individual activities will not be awarded. 

To view previous awardees, visit the Campus Grants page.

For consideration, the application form must be completed and sent to amber.diaz@duke.edu.

Download the form now: Word.

Jul 082016
 
 July 8, 2016  Comments Off on Alumna chronicles journey from Duke to a career in global development

Liz-Photo9-400Elizabeth Hoyler (’16, Economics and Global Health) has begun writing about her experiences working with Janalakshmi Financial Services, a microfinance organization in Bangalore, India. Over the course of the coming year, she will travel to Senegal and Thailand to work with Burmese migrants and refugees, in part with the organization Dreamlopments.

While at Duke, Hoyler worked with Bhutanese refugees in Nepal through the Kenan Institute for Ethics’ DukeImmerse: Uprooted/Rerouted program, followed by a KIE-sponsored internship with the World Food Programme outside Damak, Nepal. This past year, she was one of the student organizers of our Supporting Women’s Action (SuWA) refugee community partnership. She says of her experiences:

Kenan has formed me in more ways that I could probably know. I am so grateful for the opportunities, and the team that made it happen!

Jun 202016
 
 June 20, 2016  Comments Off on KIE Graduate Fellow applications due July 11

Grad-AwardsEach year, the Kenan Institute for Ethics selects up to 12 graduate student applications for the Graduate Student Fellowships each academic year. Students from any Duke graduate program may apply. Ideal candidates will be in the 3rd or 4th year of their PhD studies: finished all (or almost all) of their coursework requirements, but still developing new ideas and approaches for their dissertation research.

The Fellows receive an award of $3000 that supplements their current funding. This Fellowship involves regular participation in a seminar (typically featuring an invited speaker) that meets approximately five times in each of the Fall and Spring semesters, on a Monday from noon-1:30 pm. In addition, there will be a half-day workshop during the pre-exam reading break at the end of each term.

The seminar series does not typically require extensive preparation in advance. The aim of the on-going discussion among the fellows and Institute faculty members in the seminar is to enhance everyone’s ability to contribute to debates involving ethical issues, and to do so in ways that engage scholars and others both within and outside of their own academic disciplines. Fellows will also be asked to participate in a one-day workshop early in the fall of their Fellowship year, and in two late-afternoon workshops – one late in fall and one late in the spring semester.

The deadline to apply for the Graduate Fellowship at the Kenan Institute for Ethics for the 2016-2017 academic year is Monday, July 11, 2016. For further information, contact kie@duke.edu with “Graduate Fellowship question” in the subject heading.

Download the application (docx)

 

Mar 242016
 
 March 24, 2016  Comments Off on Citizenship Lab project works toward solutions for resettled refugee youth

This year, The Kenan Institute for Ethics has supported a Bass Connections project through the Silver Family Fund connecting locally resettled refugee youth with Duke researchers to identify solutions to ease the transition for refugees. Dubbed “The Citizenship Lab,” the project works to encourage civic engagement by the youth as well as together find ways to overcome cultural and linguistic barriers that often make access to resources, jobs, education and social support difficult. As quoted in the Duke Chronicle, fourth-year graduate student Alex Oprea says:

Since this is our first year, our first challenge was to understand the particular challenges faced by a displaced population. For all of [our students], we hope that because they know so many more people in the community, they’ll be able to use these community resources as they move forward. We’re trying to help them build a network and to understand that they’re not outsiders.

Mar 152016
 
 March 15, 2016  Comments Off on DukeImmerse students write of experiences in Jordan

Immerse-map-400-1Letters home from our six undergraduate students in the DukeImmerse: Uprooted/Rerouted program are being coming in. The students are spending a month abroad examining the refugee crisis through field interviews based out of Jordan from late February through late March. The students reflect on the ethics of field work, how to process the personal stories of the refugees seeking resettlement, and the issues that plague them as they wait.

Jan 262016
 
 January 26, 2016  Comments Off on Suzanne Shanahan joins Duke panel on ISIS and the refugee crisis

SuzanneThe Duke Middle East Studies Center and Campaign Stop 2016 recently held a panel featuring Duke experts commenting on the rise and geopolitical impact of the Islamic State. KIE Co-Director Suzanne Shanahan was joined by Duke professors Omid Safi, David Schanzer and David Siegel, with panel moderation by political science professor Abdeslam Maghraoui.

Read a recap of the panel on Duke Today:

Discussing international refugee law, Shanahan also pointed out that the thousands of Syrians and Iraqis entering Europe — and the millions in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey — are asylum-seekers who have the legal right to protection by European and Middle Eastern countries. In the U.S., refugees undergo an extensive screening process by both Homeland Security and the United Nations before they are admitted, and this country has welcomed 800,000 refugees since 2001.