Sep 012016
 
 September 1, 2016  Tagged with: ,

As a parallel event with the second Global Health Film Festival, scheduled for Feb. 27 through March 4, Debora Diniz will discuss the Zika virus and its impact on reproductive rights for women in Brazil based on her work before the Brazilian Supreme Court on cases involving abortion, marriage equality, and stem cell research.

This event is sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic at Duke Law School, and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

To RSVP, or for more information, please contact Ali Prince.

12:30 pm Wednesday, March 1
Duke Law School Room 4047

 

Aug 232016
 
 August 23, 2016  Tagged with: ,

Conv.HR_-300x225During the 2016 election, Donald Trump routinely highlighted the economic suffering faced by American workers, critiquing deinstrialization and arguing that trade agreements played a major role in the loss of American manufacturing jobs. Despite this, he has not indicated any interest in making trade agreements fairer by raising labor standards in foreign countries, as critics of international trade agreements, as well as some human rights proponents, have advocated.

What kinds of changes can we expect to the governance of labor, both domestically and in international agreements under the Trump administration? Can we expect anything more than a new era of repression, or does Trump’s rejection of multinational trade agreements also present opportunities for either labor or human rights advocates? What strategies might working people, particularly those on the margins in the U.S. and elsewhere, employ to challenge repressive conditions they face at work given the rise of the anti-regulatory Right? What new regimes of governance might emerge?

Join us on February 23rd for a discussion of these questions. Panelists include:

  • Cynthia Estlund (NYU Law School, Catherine A. Rein Professor of Law)
  • Kevin Kolben (Rutgers Business School, Investigative Journalist)
  • Moderated by Peter Pihos (Duke Thomspon Writing Program, Lecturing Fellow)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

The event will be held on Thursday, February 23 2017 at 4:30-6:00pm, located in West Duke, Room 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room).

Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth by Thursday, February 20th at noon.

Aug 202016
 
 August 20, 2016

Since 2012,  Sareta Ashraph has served as the Senior Analyst for the U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Syria since 2012, investigating and publishing regular reports on the human rights conditions in Syria. Hear from Ashraph as she dicusses her work with the Commission in documenting human rights abuses and genocide committed by ISIS against the Yazidi minority in Iraq and Syria.

This event is sponsored by the International Human Rights Clinic at Duke Law School. Co-sponsors include the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Human Rights Clinic, the Center for International and Comparative Law, Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, International Law Society, and the Human Rights Law Society.

To RSVP, or for more information, please contact Ali Prince at ali.prince@law.duke.edu. Lunch will be served.

Monday, Feb. 20, 12:30 PM
Law School 4047

 

Aug 082016
 
 August 8, 2016

With regular reports of police killings of unarmed citizens, the issue of police misconduct is now on the national agenda.  Jamie Kalven is an investigative journalist and human rights activist who has reported extensively on patterns of police abuse and impunity in Chicago.  It was Kalven who brought the police killing of Laquan McDonald to public attention.  Most recently, he has published a compelling account of the operations of the code of silence in the Chicago Police Department.

Kalven’s work became the focus of a protracted legal controversy in 2005-2006, when he refused to comply with a subpoena demanding his notes. A series of legal actions eventually established that documents bearing on allegations of police misconduct are public information. Civil rights lawyers have hailed the ruling as “historic” and a “watershed.”

Jamie Kalven will be the Kenan Practitioner-in-Residence with the Cover-ups and Exposes project at KIE. His public lecture will address lessons learned about institutional accountability during the turbulent period since the release of the Laquan McDonald video. The event is co-sponsored by the Forum for Scholars and Publics and the Department of Political Science.

Wednesday, Feb. 8, 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m., reception to follow
Rm 103 Gross Hall for Interdisciplinary Innovation
(on the corner of Science Drive and Towerview on Duke’s West Campus)
Parking: Chemistry Gated Lot on corner of Towerview and Circuit Drive (right next to Gross Hall)

In addition to Kalven’s public lecture, he will also appear on WUNC’s State of Things at noon, Feb. 8. A livestream is available on the WUNC website.

kalven_lower bar logo_white

 

 

 

Aug 072016
 
 August 7, 2016

Conv.HROver the course of a decade, a team of Chicago police officers, involved in the illicit drug trade, framed individuals who did not cooperate with them by planting drugs on them. Investigative Reporter Jamie Kalven recently exposed the story, and has worked this past year with the Exoneration Project to secure the release of two of the individuals who were framed. As Joshua Tepfer, one of the leads on the Exoneration Project put it, this is just “the tip of the iceberg.”

In 2011 Brandon Bethea died in a Harnett Country jail after being shot by a detention officer with a Taser. The killing was caught on videotape but no one was ever charged. Four years later, a Harnett county deputy police officer, with no search or arrest warrant, shot and killed John Livingston in his house. In the prior two years, that police officer had committed more arrests on the charge of resisting a police officer than any other deputy in the department. Recently, five North Carolina Sheriffs determined that there was no probable cause to revoke or suspend his certification. In her four-part series for the News and Observer, “Deadly Force,”
Investigative Journalist Mandy Locked exposed Bethea’s death and covered extensively the police squads of Harnett Country.

Join us on February 7th for a conversation with Jamie Kalven and Mandy Locke on police killings and abuses as well as the structures of silence and accountability that sustain or expose them.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Law School’s Innocence Project. Panelists include:

Jamie Kalven (Journalist and Founder and Executive Director of the Invisible Institute)
• Mandy Locke (News and Observer, Investigative Journalist)
• Moderated by James Coleman (Duke Law School, John S. Bradway Professor of the Practice of Law)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth by Thursday, February 2nd at noon.

Police Abuse and Impunity: Cover-Up or Standard Operating Procedure?
Tuesday, February 7th, 2017, 4:00-5:30 pm
Duke Law School, Room 3041

Jul 192016
 
 July 19, 2016

Did you miss the first Pathways of Change Information Session? We are having another on Thursday, January 19th, at 5:00 pm.

PathwaysofChange GraphicWhat’s the Pathways of Change program? Building off of last summer’s pilot program, Pathways of Change is a new program by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics being launched this summer for a cohort of students interested in the following three areas: business and human rights/csr, women’s rights and environmental justice.  Students will intern with different types of organizations working for social change across these three fields, and will work together during the summer and fall 2017 to explore the tradeoffs between different approaches towards social change.

  • Each internship will come with a $5,000 dollar stipend.
  • The partner organizations will be pre-selected, and serve as hosts to the summer intern.
  • Students will participate in an interdisciplinary ½ credit seminar in the Fall of 2017 on Theories and Strategies of Social Change.

What will I learn at the Information Session? You will learn a bit about the specific partners listed, and we will answer questions you may have about the application and selection process.

Where can I find more information about the program and the deadline for applications?  More information, including about last year’s program and this summer’s final roster of partner organizations (not yet posted), can be found here: http://kenan.ethics.duke.edu/humanrights/students/pathways-of-change/. Check back as this website will regularly updated with information about partners and important dates.  The deadline for applications is January 25th 2017, with the first round of interviews (at Kenan) likely taking place the following week.

Thursday, January 19, 5-6pm 
West Duke Building, Room 107F

 

 

May 092016
 
 May 9, 2016

New tools for identification of missing migrants crossing the US-Mexico border include isotopes, DNA, cranial measurements, and GPS mapping. Kate Spradley and Chelsey Juarez will share stories on the scientific efforts to identify the unknown dead.

Join us on Tuesday, November 15 at 7:00pm for a screening of the film Who is Dayani Cristal?, followed by a discussion with guest speakers Kate Spradley, PhD, Department of Anthropology at Texas State University and Chelsey Juarez, PhD, Department of Anthropology & Sociology at NC State University.

Event will take place at The Tavern, 1900 W. Markham Ave. Durham, NC.

 

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May 012016
 
 May 1, 2016

This Keynote Lecture by Gayle Solomon will explore the case of Latisha King, a genderScreen Shot 2016-11-28 at 3.39.44 PM-transgressive 15-year-old who was shot and killed in an Oxnard, California junior high school by a 14-year-old classmate in 2008. Salamon will offer a phenomenological reading of the school and the courtroom to explore the paradoxical nature of gender and race in this legal case, in which gender was simultaneously treated as a material object and understood as the effect of immaterial bodily gesture. This event is co-Sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Contact julie.wynmor@duke.edu for questions or more information.

Thursday, December 1, 5:30-7pm
The Pink Parlor, East Duke Building, 112 Campus Dr.
Reception Follows

Apr 172016
 
 April 17, 2016

Come listen to Come listen to students talk about their past internships at the Pathways of Change Information Session on Thursday, November 17th.

PathwaysofChange GraphicWhat’s the Pathways of Change program? Building off last summer’s pilot program, Pathway of Change is a new program by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics being launched this summer for a cohort of students interested in the following three areas: business and human rights/csr, and, conditional on funding, women’s rights and environmental justice.  Students will intern with different types of organizations working for social change across these three fields, and will work together during the summer and fall 2017 to explore the tradeoffs between different approaches towards social change.

  • Each internship will come with a $3,000-4,000 dollar stipend.
  • The partner organizations will be pre-selected, and serve as hosts to the summer intern.
  • Students will participate in an interdisciplinary ½ credit seminar in the Fall of 2017 on Theories and Strategies of Social Change.

What will I learn at the Information Session? You will hear from three students who participated in the business and human rights pilot program last summer,  learn about the potential expansion to women’s rights and environmental justice areas, and be given information about the application process and deadline.  

Where can I find more information about the program and the deadline for applications?  More information, including about last year’s program and this summer’s final roster of partner organizations (not yet posted), can be found here: http://kenan.ethics.duke.edu/humanrights/students/pathways-of-change/. Check back as this website will regularly updated with information about partners and important dates.  The deadline for applications is January 25th 2017, with the first round of interviews (at Kenan) likely taking place the following week.

Thursday, November 17, 5-6pm 
West Duke Building, Room 107

Apr 152016
 
 April 15, 2016

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The Interrogating Markets Kenan Collaboratory Grant is bringing Saskia Sassen to Duke to discuss expulsions in the global marketplace. The talk will be moderated by Professor Michaeline Crichlow (Professor of African and African American Studies, Duke University). Discussants include Walter Mignolo (Professor of Literature and Romance Studies, Duke University) and Dirk Philipsen (Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics & Associate Research Professor of Economic History at the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University).

foto saskia sassenSaskia Sassen is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and Member, The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University (www.saskiasassen.com). Her new book is Expulsions: Brutality and Complexity in the Global Economy (Harvard University Press 2014). Recent books are Territory, Authority, Rights: From Medieval to Global Assemblages ( Princeton University Press 2008), A Sociology of Globalization (W.W.Norton 2007), and the 4th fully updated edition of Cities in a World Economy (Sage 2012). Among older books are The Global City (Princeton University Press 1991/2001), and Guests and Aliens (New Press 1999). Her books are translated into over 20 languages. She is the recipient of diverse awards and mentions, including multiple doctor honoris causa, named lectures, and being selected as one of the top global thinkers on diverse lists. Most recently she was awarded the Principe de Asturias 2013 Prize in the Social Sciences and made a member of the Royal Academy of the Sciences of Netherland.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 6:00pm-7:30pm
Nelson Music Room
Reception to follow at 7:30pm in the Pink Parlor.