Dec 202017
 
 December 20, 2017  Tagged with: ,
The Duke Islamic Studies Center, along with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will host its second event Oct. 11 as part of the “American Muslims, Civil and Human Rights” series, which examines the current human rights crisis for Muslims in the U.S.
Dr. Sophia Rose Arjana will discuss the ways in which Muslims have been dehumanized in public discourse, resulting in the hostile climate American Muslims must contend with, while also being attentive to the ways in which Muslims are challenging this discourse through activist interventions. In particular, Dr. Arjana will focus on the graphic narratives that include comics, graphic novels, and webcomics—genres that have opened up new spaces for Muslims to voice their concerns about Islamophobia. Dr. Arjana is a scholar of Religion whose books include Muslims in the Western Imagination (Oxford, 2015), Pilgrimage in Islam: Traditional and Modern Practices (2017), and Veiled Superheroes: Islam, Feminism, and Popular Culture (2017).

Time:          
4:30 to 6 p.m.
Date:           Feb. 1st
Location:   West Duke 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room)
Dec 202017
 
 December 20, 2017  Tagged with: ,

Detention, Deportation and Death: America’s Undocumented Immigrants Under Fire

Join us in the Jameson Gallery, 225 Friedl on Feb. 22nd at 5pm for a Talk with Margaret Regan on Undocumented Immigrants in America.

Margaret Regan is the author of two prizewinning books on immigration. Her work has been published in the Washington Post, Al Jazeera English, Utne Reader.  Sojourners, Newsday, Black + White, Photovision and in many regional and local publications. She has appeared on NPR, C-Span Book TV, WHYY Philadelphia, KPFK Los Angeles, Pacifica and many other radio stations, and she gave a TEDx talk in Phoenix. Most recently, in March 2016, Margaret did a solo half-hour Q&A appearance on Book TV’s “Open Phones,” program, taking questions about immigration from viewers around the nation. She’s a regular speaker at the Tucson Festival of Books. Her books have been adopted in many university classrooms, including the University of California Davis, Loyola University Chicago, Franklin Marshall College, James Madison University, Butler University, Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University and the University of Arizona.

This event is co-sponsored by: The Duke Human Rights Center at FHI, The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Latino Studies, International Comparative Studies, History, Cultural Anthropology, The Human Rights Archive at the Rubenstein Library, The International Human Rights Clinic, and The Center for International and Comparative Law

Oct 172017
 
 October 17, 2017

Are there lessons from South African anti-state activism for global human rights movements? Join the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics Nov. 15, 4:30 – 6:00pm, for a panel conversation about the novel ways in which South Africans are critiquing their chaotic and corrupt government. In everyday action, language and discourse, South Africans are developing new languages of resistance, redefining their relationship with media and politicians, and are finding new ways to reshape their country. These gestures, whether lived or mediated, build on and evoke earlier sites of struggle in South Africa.

Panelists include:

  • Kerry Chance, Department of Geography & Anthropology, Louisiana State University
  • Rosalind Morris, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
  • Moderated by Catherine Mathers, International Comparative Studies, Duke University

The event is part of the on-going discussion series ‘Conversation in Human Rights,’ which brings together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law and policy.

The event takes place at the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101) in the West Duke Building.

Please RSVP to Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu by 5pm on November 10.

Apr 112017
 
 April 11, 2017

The Duke Islamic Studies Center, along with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will host its second event Oct. 11 as part of the “American Muslims, Civil and Human Rights” series, which examines the current human rights crisis for Muslims in the U.S.

Khaled Beydoun, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, will present the talk, “Policing Muslim Identity During the Time of Trump” from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101) in the West Duke Building on East Campus. The event is open to the public.

Additional programming for the series will take place over the course of the 2017-2018 academic year.

4:30 to 6 p.m.
Oct. 11
West Duke Building

Mar 212017
 
 March 21, 2017

Human rights norms and principles are now seen as central to global health, offering universal frameworks for the advancement of global justice through public health. Despite the development of health-related human rights under international law, the implementation of these rights requires global governance to translate into policies, programs, and practices.

Join the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Sept. 21 for a panel conversation about  organizational efforts to implement human rights and analyze the distinct institutional factors that facilitate or inhibit human rights “mainstreaming” for global health advancement. The event takes place at Duke’s School of Nursing in room 1014, with a reception afterward.

Panelists include:

  • Lawrence O. Gostin (University Professor, O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law, Georgetown University)
  • Benjamin Mason Meier (Associate Professor of Global Health Policy, Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Alicia Ely Yamin (Visiting Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center; Adjunct Lecturer on Law and Global Health, Harvard University; Panelist, UN Secretary General’s Independent Accountability Panel for the SDGs (EWEC); Global Fellow,Norway’s Centre on Law and Social Transformation)
  • The program will be moderated by Gavin Yamey, Professor of the Practice of Global Health at Duke.

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

To RSVP for the event, email Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu by noon Sept. 18,

The event will be held on Thursday, Sept. 21 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in Room 1014 at the School of Nursing.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Global Health Institute, Center for International and Comparative Law and the UNC Department of Public Policy. 

Mar 172017
 
 March 17, 2017

Two Kenan Institute for Ethics’ community programs focused on interacting and empowering the local refugee community will host an open house on Sunday, Sept. 17.

The MASTERY and SuWA programs, which partner with locally-resettled refugees, will hold an annual gathering to provide an opportunity for Duke students interested in serving as tutors to get acquainted with the families with whom they’ll be working. Students interested in participating are welcome to attend the open house to learn more and sign up to volunteer for the upcoming semester.

Both programs are student-organized and offer a way to better understand global issues on a local level. See images from a recent MASTERY program in this story.

The event will include refreshments for all and activities for the children.

Sunday, Sept. 17
3 to 5 p.m.
West Duke Building

Mar 162017
 
 March 16, 2017

Join the Kenan Institute for Ethics Sept. 16 to celebrate the work of Katz Family Fellow Libia Posada, a Colombian surgeon and artist.

Posada will showcase her art installation “BE PATIENT | SE PACIENTE,” which is comprised of materials collected from Duke’s Medical Surplus Warehouse and her own work. The event runs 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fredric Jameson Gallery (115) in the Friedl Building on East Campus and is open to the public.

The installation will remain in the Friedl Building through Sept. 20. Posada’s visit is supported by the Katz Family Women, Ethics and Leadership Fund and in partnership between the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke’s Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Duke Global Health Institute, and the Artist Studio Project.

For more information about Posada and her stay on campus, see this story.

Mar 162017
 
 March 16, 2017

Education professionals are invited to join the Kenan Refugee Project at Duke University for Rethinking Newcomer Education, a one-day conference focused on challenges and solutions for refugee youth in the public education system.

The program will include morning panel discussions with leading experts on interrupted education and childhood trauma, followed by small group workshops with individual panelists in the afternoon.

Registration for the conference has hit capacity – thank you to all who signed up.

Schedule of Events

8 a.m.: Check-in and breakfast

8:45 a.m.: Opening remarks

9 a.m. Panel: “The Newcomer as a Student”

  • Educational consultant Dr. Andrea DeCapua
  • Las Americas Middle School Principal Maria Moreno
  • Doris Henderson Newcomer School Curriculum Facilitator Valeria Kouba

10:30 a.m. Panel: “Trauma and Learning”

  • Clinical Psychologist Dr. Molly Benson
  • Research Scientist Dr. Katie Rosanbalm
  • Legal Advocate Michael Gregory

Noon: Lunch

1 p.m.: Roundtable Workshops

3:15 p.m.: Closing remarks with reception to follow

Panel Discussions

Panel 1 – 9 a.m.

“The Newcomer as a Student”

Educational consultant Dr. Andrea DeCapua, Las Americas Middle School principal Maria Moreno, and curriculum facilitator for the Doris Henderson Newcomer School Valeria Kouba evaluate and address the varying challenges of newcomer education both in the classroom and at an administrative level.

Panel 2 – 10:30 a.m.

“Trauma and Learning”

Clinical psychologist Dr. Molly Benson, research scientist Dr. Katie Rosanbalm, and legal advocate Michael Gregory discuss the impact past trauma can have on children in the classroom and approaches to constructive intervention.

Roundtable Workshops

Attendees will be able to join one of these six roundtable discussions, which will take place concurrently at 1 p.m.

  • Las Americas: A Case-Study in Newcomer Education with Maria Moreno
  • Classroom Challenges: Building Strategies for Newcomer Student Success with Valeria Kouba
  • Beyond the Classroom: Trauma Sensitive Schools as Policy with Michael Gregory
  • Mutually Adaptive Learning: A Culturally Sensitive Approach to Newcomer Education with Dr. Andrea DeCapua
  • The Clinical Approach: Treating Trauma in Refugee Youth with Dr. Molly Benson
  • The Local Context: Exploring Trauma Intervention Strategies in N.C. Classrooms with Dr. Katie Rosanbalm

Speaker Bios

Dr. Molly Benson is the Associate Director for Refugee Treatment and Services at the Refugee Trauma and Resilience Center at Boston Children’s Hospital. She provides oversight, training, supervision, and support for program activities focused on the development and dissemination of treatment interventions and resources for refugee children and families. She is licensed clinical psychologist who has experience providing evaluation and treatment to children and adolescents, including those who are refugees and youth seeking asylum in US. For several years she provided clinical services and supervision through the Psychosocial Treatment Program at Boston Children’s Hospital and currently she maintains a small private practice.

Andrea DeCapua, Ed.D., is a researcher, educator, and educational consultant. Her interests include second language acquisition, intercultural awareness, and second language learners and the classroom. She specializes in teacher training for teachers working with students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE) as well as other struggling culturally and linguistically diverse learners.

Dr. DeCapua, alongside her colleague Helaine Marshall, has developed the Mutually Adaptive Learning Paradigm (MALP®), transition struggling learners to the educational priorities and practices of formal education. She is a frequent presenter and trainer at conferences, national organizations, and school districts around the country, and the author of several books on SLIFE and other struggling language learners.

Michael Gregory is Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Senior Attorney at the Trauma Learning and Policy Initiative (TLPI), a collaboration between Harvard Law School and the Massachusetts Advocates for Children. Along with Susan Cole the director of TLPI, Mike co-teaches Harvard’s Education Law Clinic, in which law students represent individual families of traumatized children in the special education system and participate in TLPI’s larger systemic advocacy for trauma-sensitive schools. Mike is a co-author of TLPI’s landmark report and policy agenda Helping Traumatized Children Learn, and is also a co-author of Educational Rights of Children Affected by Homelessness and/or Domestic Violence, a manual for child advocates. In 2009, Mike was named a Bellow Scholar by the Association of American Law Schools, in recognition of TLPI’s advocacy for Safe and Supportive Schools legislation in Massachusetts. He received his JD from Harvard Law School in 2004, graduating cum laude, and he also holds a Master of Arts in Teaching from Brown University.

Maria Moreno is the Principal of Las Americas Newcomer School. Las Americas is an English intensive school for recent immigrant and refugee students who have had a limited formal education in their native countries. Las Americas represents students from 32 different countries and 29 different languages, including Urdu, Nepali, Swahili, Arabic, and Vietnamese. She is a recognized member of the American Leadership Forum, Houston/Gulf Coast Chapter, Association of Hispanic School Administrators, Houston Association of School Administrators, and the Gulfton Youth Development Program. She is a featured speaker for the National Hispanic Professional Organization (NHPO), on the topic of Diversity Education in the 21st Century Classroom.

Valeria Kouba currently serves as the Curriculum Facilitator at Doris Henderson Newcomers School in Guilford County, NC, serving immigrants and refugees in their first year in US schools. She collaborates with several teams of teachers to design and implement curriculum, instructional units, and interventions to accelerate the language acquisition of ELLs in grades 3-12. In addition, she has focused on implementing appropriate assessment tools to monitor the academic progress of ELLs.  She has a special interest in creating opportunities for students to develop their leadership skills and for teachers to grow in their cultural competence. Mrs. Kouba, a national of Argentina, has experienced Newcomers’ education and its challenges both as a mother and as an educator. During her twenty-eight years in education, she has taught English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in Argentina, taught Spanish and English as a Second Language (ESL) in US, and facilitated professional development for teachers in Argentina, Japan, and US. She was recognized as Teacher of the Year in 2008.

Katie Rosanbalm is trained as a child clinical and quantitative psychologist. Her work focuses on program implementation and evaluation in the areas of child maltreatment prevention, early childhood systems, and self-regulation development. She has conducted longitudinal evaluations of child welfare reform, early childhood Systems of Care, and manualized mental health and educational interventions. She has also served on multiple state-level boards and task forces to strengthen the evidence-based implementation of programs for children.

Mar 142017
 
 March 14, 2017

What attracts Western activists to “save” Africa when we have our own crises at home?

Attend a free screening of FRAMED, a documentary that takes a provocative look at image-making and activism, following an inspiring young Kenyan photojournalist turned activist who shatters the stereotype of the passive aid recipient.The event takes place 5 to 6:45 p.m. Sept. 14 in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101), West Duke Building on Duke’s East Campus.

Hosted by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, the evening will include a showing of the film followed by a Q&A with co-producer Catherine Mathers of Duke’s International and Comparative Studies, as well as Gustavo Furtado, Assistant Professor with Duke’s Department of Romance Studies.

For more information on the film, please visit the FRAMED website.

For more information about the event, please contact e-mail Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu

Feb 282017
 
 February 28, 2017

Join the Kenan Institute for Ethics for its annual celebration kicking off the new academic year. Enjoy food and reconnect with friends after a summer away from campus. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. and will be held on the lawn outside the West Duke Building on East Campus.

Students, faculty, staff and their families are welcome.