Aug 132018
 
 August 13, 2018  Tagged with: ,

Join the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics at 5:00 p.m. on Sept. 13 for a conversation about the ethics of malaria diplomacy in Myanmar. The featured speaker will be Myaing Myaing Nyunt, associate professor of Global Health & Medicine at Duke University, and director of the Duke Global Health Institute Myanmar.

The conversation will take place in the Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room (153), Rubenstein Library.

 

Mar 272018
 
 March 27, 2018  Tagged with: ,

Ethical shoppers sipping an Ethos bottle of water support sanitation in Tanzania, buying a pair of TOMS shoes automatically donates a pair of shoes to “a child in need,” and mixing with Belvedere RED vodka contributes to the fight against HIV/AIDS in Africa.  Today’s marketplace is inundated with products supporting humanitarian causes that promise to give aid to beneficiaries, provide “good feelings” to consumers and promote the brands of corporations and humanitarian NGOs. The commodification of humanitarianism (turning people and causes into marketable things) is linked to the privatization of help (replacing public donors with private philanthropy) with significant and as of yet poorly understood consequences. Commodifying Compassion will introduce research exploring how “helping” has become a marketable commodity and how this impacts humanitarianism symbolically and materially.

The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics invites you to a panel discussion. Panelists include:

Lisa Ann Richey, Duke University and Roskilde University (Denmark), @BrandAid_World, “Implications of Commodifying Compassion on Business, Politics and Social Relations”

Alexandra Cosima Budabin, University of Dayton and Free University of Bolzano (Italy), @ABudabin,“Crafting Humanitarian Imaginaries: The Visual Story-Telling of Buy-One Give-One Marketing Campaigns”

Mie Vestergaard, Roskilde University (Denmark),“Private Business, Partnerships and Humanitarianism in Africa: ‘Win-Win – So Who Loses?’”

The panel will be moderated by

Catherine Mathers, International & Comparative Studies, Duke University

Follow Commodifying Compassion on Twitter  @CocoResearch

 

The event will be held on Thursday, April 12th from 4:30 – 6:00 pm in Room 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room) West Duke

Please RSVP to sk272@duke.edu by Monday, April 9 at noon.

 

Mar 272018
 
 March 27, 2018  Tagged with: ,

In The Twilight of Cutting: African Activism and Life after NGOs Saida Hodzic explores the role of Ghanaian feminist and reproductive health NGOs that have organized campaigns against female genital cutting over the last 30 years, a period that has seen a decrease in cutting across Africa, and an increase in discourses surrounding cutting in the West. In problematizing their campaigns, transnational and regional encounters and the forms of governmentality that they produce, the book offers a critical lens on the claims of human rights, and the limits of cultural relativism and feminist activism. In this conversation, we would like to explore the book’s implications for a) how US-based people do and do not, but should support human rights in the global South and b) what the book reveals about the unique challenges and opportunities for human rights activism when governed by a liberal vs. illiberal administration.

Join us for a conversation:

· Saida Hodžić, Anthropology (Cornell University)

· Anu Sharma, Associate Professor, Anthropology (Wesleyan University)

· Moderated by Catherine Mathers, International and Comparative Studies (Duke)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

It is co-sponsored by the Department of Cultural Anthropology, Duke Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies, and the Duke Law School International Human Rights Clinic.

The event will be held on Thursday, April 5th, 4:30 – 6:00 pm, in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke, Room 101.

To RSVP for the event, email sk272@duke.edu by noon April 2nd.

Feb 132018
 
 February 13, 2018  Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Celebrate the start of the new school year with the Kenan Institute for Ethics! Enjoy great food and reconnect with friends and colleagues after a summer away from campus!

Thursday, August 30th, 5:30 PM

West Duke Building Lawn, East Campus

Students, faculty, staff and their families are welcome!

Dec 202017
 
 December 20, 2017
The Duke Islamic Studies Center, along with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will host its second event Oct. 11 as part of the “American Muslims, Civil and Human Rights” series, which examines the current human rights crisis for Muslims in the U.S.
Dr. Sophia Rose Arjana will discuss the ways in which Muslims have been dehumanized in public discourse, resulting in the hostile climate American Muslims must contend with, while also being attentive to the ways in which Muslims are challenging this discourse through activist interventions. In particular, Dr. Arjana will focus on the graphic narratives that include comics, graphic novels, and webcomics—genres that have opened up new spaces for Muslims to voice their concerns about Islamophobia. Dr. Arjana is a scholar of Religion whose books include Muslims in the Western Imagination (Oxford, 2015), Pilgrimage in Islam: Traditional and Modern Practices (2017), and Veiled Superheroes: Islam, Feminism, and Popular Culture (2017).

Time:          
4:30 to 6 p.m.
Date:           Feb. 1st
Location:   West Duke 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room)
Dec 202017
 
 December 20, 2017

Detention, Deportation and Death: America’s Undocumented Immigrants Under Fire

Join us in the Jameson Gallery, 225 Friedl on Feb. 22nd at 5pm for a Talk with Margaret Regan on Undocumented Immigrants in America.

Margaret Regan is the author of two prizewinning books on immigration. Her work has been published in the Washington Post, Al Jazeera English, Utne Reader.  Sojourners, Newsday, Black + White, Photovision and in many regional and local publications. She has appeared on NPR, C-Span Book TV, WHYY Philadelphia, KPFK Los Angeles, Pacifica and many other radio stations, and she gave a TEDx talk in Phoenix. Most recently, in March 2016, Margaret did a solo half-hour Q&A appearance on Book TV’s “Open Phones,” program, taking questions about immigration from viewers around the nation. She’s a regular speaker at the Tucson Festival of Books. Her books have been adopted in many university classrooms, including the University of California Davis, Loyola University Chicago, Franklin Marshall College, James Madison University, Butler University, Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University and the University of Arizona.

This event is co-sponsored by: The Duke Human Rights Center at FHI, The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Latino Studies, International Comparative Studies, History, Cultural Anthropology, The Human Rights Archive at the Rubenstein Library, The International Human Rights Clinic, and The Center for International and Comparative Law

Oct 202017
 
 October 20, 2017  Tagged with: , ,


The Cost of Opportunity: Educate to Liberate

Friday, April 20, 2018
8:30 am – 5:30 pm
Divinity School Room 0014W
Duke West Campus

See attached flyer for more details. The complete conference program can be found at https://sites.duke.edu/project_duke_baixada_project/cost-of-opportunity-educate-to-liberate/. The conference will be recorded and live streamed here.

Funded in part by a Kenan Institute for Ethics Campus Grant.

Oct 172017
 
 October 17, 2017

Are there lessons from South African anti-state activism for global human rights movements? Join the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics Nov. 15, 4:30 – 6:00pm, for a panel conversation about the novel ways in which South Africans are critiquing their chaotic and corrupt government. In everyday action, language and discourse, South Africans are developing new languages of resistance, redefining their relationship with media and politicians, and are finding new ways to reshape their country. These gestures, whether lived or mediated, build on and evoke earlier sites of struggle in South Africa.

Panelists include:

  • Kerry Chance, Department of Geography & Anthropology, Louisiana State University
  • Rosalind Morris, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University
  • Moderated by Catherine Mathers, International Comparative Studies, Duke University

The event is part of the on-going discussion series ‘Conversation in Human Rights,’ which brings together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law and policy.

The event takes place at the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101) in the West Duke Building.

Please RSVP to Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu by 5pm on November 10.

Apr 112017
 
 April 11, 2017

The Duke Islamic Studies Center, along with the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, will host its second event Oct. 11 as part of the “American Muslims, Civil and Human Rights” series, which examines the current human rights crisis for Muslims in the U.S.

Khaled Beydoun, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, will present the talk, “Policing Muslim Identity During the Time of Trump” from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101) in the West Duke Building on East Campus. The event is open to the public.

Additional programming for the series will take place over the course of the 2017-2018 academic year.

4:30 to 6 p.m.
Oct. 11
West Duke Building

Mar 212017
 
 March 21, 2017

Human rights norms and principles are now seen as central to global health, offering universal frameworks for the advancement of global justice through public health. Despite the development of health-related human rights under international law, the implementation of these rights requires global governance to translate into policies, programs, and practices.

Join the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Sept. 21 for a panel conversation about  organizational efforts to implement human rights and analyze the distinct institutional factors that facilitate or inhibit human rights “mainstreaming” for global health advancement. The event takes place at Duke’s School of Nursing in room 1014, with a reception afterward.

Panelists include:

  • Lawrence O. Gostin (University Professor, O’Neill Chair in Global Health Law, Georgetown University)
  • Benjamin Mason Meier (Associate Professor of Global Health Policy, Zachary Taylor Smith Distinguished Professor of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
  • Alicia Ely Yamin (Visiting Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center; Adjunct Lecturer on Law and Global Health, Harvard University; Panelist, UN Secretary General’s Independent Accountability Panel for the SDGs (EWEC); Global Fellow,Norway’s Centre on Law and Social Transformation)
  • The program will be moderated by Gavin Yamey, Professor of the Practice of Global Health at Duke.

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

To RSVP for the event, email Deirdre White at deirdre.white@duke.edu by noon Sept. 18,

The event will be held on Thursday, Sept. 21 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in Room 1014 at the School of Nursing.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Global Health Institute, Center for International and Comparative Law and the UNC Department of Public Policy.