Activities

 

Throughout each academic year, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics hosts a variety of programs and events open to the Duke community, bringing deeper insight and expertise to topics of the day.

COLLABORATIONS 

Q&A-400The Science, Ethics, Identity and Human Rights (SEIHR) Kenan Collaboratory project synergizes scholars, researchers and students in the sciences and humanities to examine a key challenge in the world: the ethical application of scientific technologies for human identification in human rights contexts. The team examines ethically sound processes for human identification in high-risk populations that maximize the investigative utility and minimize risk of privacy violation. Leading the project are Sara Katsanis of Duke and Seth Faith of NCSU.

MSI Integrity has launched a project identifying and mapping existing Multi-stakeholder initiatives (MSIs) in an open and accessible database. This will be the first public mapping of MSIs operating in business and human rights. This project is being developed with pro bono support from law firm Miller & Chevalier in Washington, DC, and research support from the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, at Duke University. During the Spring 2015 semester, students in the Business and Human Rights Advocacy Lab class conducted a pilot test of an objective methodology to research and identify MSIs. The DHRC at KIE is continuing to work with MSI Integrity to review the results of this pilot research, and to outline questions for consultation with the business and human rights community.

SPEAKERS AND SERIES IN 2016-2017

Conversations in Human Rights
This workshop series brings together panelists from other institutions with Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The discussions draw together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy and are open to Duke faculty, graduate students, and postdocs. A reception will follow each workshop. Stay tuned for additional for information on additional workshops!

Incarcerating Transgender People: An Examination of the Issues
Paisley Currah (Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Professor of Political Science and Women’s & Gender studies) and Asa King (previously Southern Regional Staff Attorney for the Transgender Law Center. Moderated by Ara Wilson (Duke University, Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies)

People on the Move: Unthinking Migration Theories
Professor Mark Ellis (University of Washington, Department of Geography) and Professor Thomas Nail (University of Denver, Department of Philosophy). Moderated by Professor Michaeline Crichlow (Duke University, Departments of African and African American Studies and Sociology)

Abusive Policing with Impunity: Cover Up or Standard Operating Procedure?
Jamie Kalven (Journalist and Founder and Executive Director of the Invisible Institute) and Mandy Locke (News and Observer, Investigative Journalist). Moderated by James Coleman (Duke Law School, John S. Bradway Professor of the Practice of Law).

Labor and Human Rights in the Trump Era, at Home and Abroad
Cynthia Estlund (NYU Law School, Catherine A. Rein Professor of Law) and Kevin Kolben (Rutgers Business School, Associate Professor). Moderated by Peter Pihos (Duke Thomspon Writing Program, Lecturing Fellow).

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 2016-2017

Business and Human Rights Lab
Suzanne Katzenstein (Project Director, Duke Human Rights Center at KIE) leads a lab course in which students discuss  challenges of human rights advocacy while working in teams on policy projects for a partner human rights NGO. The core goal of the lab model is to provide an opportunity for students to build practical and analytical skills while contributing meaningfully to an important human rights problem. This lab focuses on business and human rights, and students work with international partner organizations with a regional focus in South Asia.

MASTERY
Mentorship, Academics, and Self-esteem: Tutoring and Engaging with Refugee Youth (MASTERY) is a weekly K-12 tutoring program for refugee youth in Durham. This ongoing community partnership, organized by Kenan Institute for Ethics students Olivia Johnson, Josephine Ramseyer, Rishi Sachdev, and Madison Thomas, pairs Duke undergraduate tutors and refugee students with the goal of providing mentorship, assistance with schoolwork, English tutoring, and a supportive community.

SuWA (Supporting Women’s Action)
This community based project worked to empower refugee women in Durham through education and community building. Weekly meetings provided English classes for Arabic speakers, community building events, and focus groups to facilitate cultural expression and mobilize community action.

Global Human Rights Scholars
This new initiative for 2016-2017 is devoted to exploring what the connections are between human rights activism and scholarship, as well as what they can and should be. Undergraduate students are selected by application and write blog posts on human rights topics throughout the year.

Summer Internships
Accepted students will be placed in internships that allow them to explore the nexus of human rights and either business, environmental justice, or women’s rights.

 

Activities in 2015-2016

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 2015-2016

Human Rights Lab: In the spring, Suzanne Katzenstein (Project Director, Duke Human Rights Center at KIE) taught again a lab course in which students discussed the challenges of human rights advocacy while working in teams on policy projects for a partner human rights NGO. The core goal of the lab model is to provide an opportunity for students to build practical and analytical skills while contributing meaningfully to an important human rights problem. This lab focuses on business and human rights, and students work with international partner organizations with a regional focus in South Asia.

MASTERY: Mentorship, Academics, and Self-esteem: Tutoring and Engaging with Refugee Youth (MASTERY) is a weekly K-12 tutoring program for refugee youth in Durham. This ongoing community partnership, organized by Kenan Institute for Ethics students Olivia Johnson, Josephine Ramseyer, Rishi Sachdev, and Madison Thomas, pairs Duke undergraduate tutors and refugee students with the goal of providing mentorship, assistance with schoolwork, English tutoring, and a supportive community.

SuWA (Supporting Women’s Action): This community based project worked to empower refugee women in Durham through education and community building. Weekly meetings provided English classes for Arabic speakers, community building events, and focus groups to facilitate cultural expression and mobilize community action.

Global Human Rights ScholarsThis new initiative for 2015-2016 is devoted to exploring what the connections are between human rights activism and scholarship, as well as what they can and should be. Undergraduate students are selected by application.

Summer Internships: Each summer, DHRC at KIE partners with the UN’s World Food Programme offices in Nepal to offer a Duke student the chance to work with the program on issues of outreach, implementation, and research. Read as 2013 intern Virginia Dillon and 2014 intern Elizabeth Hoyler addressed challenges in international aid generally as well as those specific to the refugee camps in Nepal.

WORKSHOPS, CONFERENCES AND EVENTS IN 2015-2016

        • Strategies and Challenges of Community-Based Environmental Research. On September 16Elizabeth Shapiro-Garza  held a discussion on the various strategies of community-based research methods that could be employed in environmental justice contexts.
        • Film screening: Seeking Truth in the Balkans. On September 30, the DHRC at KIE co-sponsored a screening of Seeking Truth in the Balkans, a film exploring the legacy of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) from the human rights versus the jurisprudential perspective.
        • Film Screening: The Living Disappeared. On October 5, the DHRC at KIE co-sponsored a screening of Duke alumna Alexa Barrett’s film The Living Disappeared: Using DNA to prevent the trafficking of children on the border.
        • Unaccompanied Minors from Central America and Special Immigrant Juvenile StatusOn October 20, Lenni Benson, Executive Director of the Safe Passage Project in New York, gave a talk titled “Unaccompanied Minors from Central America and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.” This event focused on the response under the U.S. immigration system to this crisis, and exposed students to human rights work and issues in a domestic context.
        • Thomas Parsons, International Commission on Missing Persons. On October 22, The Science, Ethics, Identity and Human Rights (SEIHR) Kenan Creative Collaboratory hosted a lecture and reception with Thomas Parsons, PhD, Director of Forensic Sciences at the International Commission on Missing Persons, on “Human Rights and DNA: Large Scale Identification of the Missing.”
        • Humanitarian Accountability: Litigation against United Nations for Cholera Outbreak in HaitiOn October 26, Beatrice Lindstrom, Staff Attorney for the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, gave a talk on “U.N. Haiti Cholera Litigation.” The event  focused on the ongoing litigation against the U.N. for the cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010 caused by improper waste removal at a U.N. peacekeeping base as well as broader issues of U.N. accountability.
        • Progressive Reform and Private Sector Responses in India and Latin America On October 27, The Forum for Scholars and Publics hosted a discussion with interdisciplinary scholars Jeffrey Rubin (Boston University) and Suzanne Katzenstein (Project director, DHRC at KIE) about the relationship between progressive political reform and the conduct of business in Latin America and India.
        • A Survivor Remembers On November 12,The Human Rights Law Society invited Rebecca Hauser, a remarkable woman who was just 22 when she and her family were taken from their home in Greece to Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. After a year of hard labor, she was moved to Bergen-Belsen, where she was liberated in 1945. Mrs. Hauser came to the United States in 1947 and has been volunteering with The Center for Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Education of North Carolina to ensure that her experience and those like hers are never forgotten
        • Identifying and Managing Trauma, Loss, and Resilience On November 13, Dr. Adam Brown, Professor in the Department of Psychology at Sarah Lawrence College and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Research Program in the Department of Psychiatry at New York University School of Medicine, gave a lecture titled “Identifying and Managing Trauma, Loss and Resilience.” The event focused on stress, trauma, vicarious trauma, and resilience among individuals working in the human rights context and the impact of human rights work on mental health.
        • The Present and Future of Civil Rights Movements: Race and Reform in 21st Century America On November 20-21, this conference provided an opportunity for those who recognize the persistent impact of systematic racism to reflect on the past and present in order to better inform the future. The conference featured Kimberlé W. Crenshaw as the Keynote speaker. Crenshaw is an American scholar in the field of Critical race theory, and a professor at UCLA School of Law and Columbia Law School where she specializes in race and gender issues.
        • The European Refugee Crisis and Human Trafficking On December 1, Klara Skrivankova, head of the Europe Programme and Advocacy Coordinator at Anti-Slavery International, gave a talk titled “Trafficking and the European Refugee/Migration Crisis.” The event focused on the risks of trafficking in connection with the ongoing European refugee/migration crisis. The event was timed to coincide with the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery (December 2).
        • Tony Reames: A Spatial Understanding of Energy Inequality in Urban America On February 4, Tony Reames (Research Fellow, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan) presented a paper on recent research to the Environmental Justice Working Group. The paper develops a model for residential heating energy use intensity in order to predict heating efficiency at the block group level for Kansas City, Missouri. The findings of this paper support arguments for targeted, community-based approaches to energy efficiency interventions.
        • Environmental Justice at the Moral Terrains of Environmental Heritage On February 25th, Robert Melchior Figueroa, associate professor of philosophy at Oregon State University, presented two case studies to the Environmental Justice Working Group. The presentation considered the relationships between settler-colonial cultures and Indigenous people as these pertain to environmental heritage; inclusive of respect for cultural identity, dependency upon tourism industry, the politics of the knowledge industry, and the management discrepancies between worldviews.
        • Robert Figueroa: Arrested Environmental Heritage and Climate Refugees On February 25th, Robert Melchior Figueroa (associate professor of philosophy at Oregon State University) spoke about the mounting problems climate refugees face and the attitudes towards this population.  The talk explored an environmental justice approach to climate refugees and to refugee resettlement practices already in place for political refugees. Focusing on both foreign and domestic cases, it also considers the conditions of environmental heritage and cultural loss, as well as the prospects for introducing alternative policy and practices to rethink the role of environmental justice for refugee populations.
        • Europe’s Refugee Crisis and the Rights of Migrants On February 29th Moritz Baumgärtel (PhD candidate from Université libre de Bruxelles) presented a lecture focused on the intersection of migrant rights and human rights in litigation before European supranational courts.
        • Legal Challenges to the CIA Torture Program On March 1st, Steven Watt, Senior Staff Attorney of the Human Rights Program at the American Civil Liberties Union gave a lecture focused on the recent ACLU lawsuit of Salim v. Mitchell filed against psychologists James Elmer Mitchell and John Jessen, whose role in designing and overseeing aspects of the post-September 11 detention and interrogation program was recently detailed in The Senate Intelligence Committee Report on Torture: Committee Study of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Detention and Interrogation Program (2014).
        • Duke Workshop on Climate Ethics and Economics On March 2nd-4th, The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics co-sponsored a workshop on the intersection of climate ethics and climate economics. The schedule included presentations by Niko Jaakkola (CESifo Group), Ewan Kingston (Duke), Geoff Brennan (ANU/UNC/Duke), Matthew Adler (Duke), Paul Kelleher (University of Wisconsin), Avram Hiller (Portland State), Geoffrey Heal (Columbia), David Frank (UNC), Anders Herlitz and David Horan (Rutgers, University College Dublin).
        • Resilient Resources: Pathways of Sustainable Justice On April 4th, Dr. Sylvia Hood Washington, environmental epidemiologist, environmental engineer and environmental historian, spoke about her work as the first African American historian to study and publish a formal history of environmental injustices in the United States.
        • Perspectives From the Field: Statelessness and The Middle East Seminar Series On April 6th, 11th, and 20th, Amit Sen, UNHCR’s Regional Protection Officer on Statelessness for the Middle East and North Africa and a visiting Kenan Practitioner in Residence, presented a three-part evening seminar on “Perspectives from the Field: Statelessness and The Middle East.” The series was open to graduating seniors, graduate and professional students.
        • Shari’a and the Promotion of Nationality Rights and Gender Equity in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region On April 7th, Amit Sen, Azizah al-Hibri, and Ellen McLarney sat on a panel to discuss the importance of hybridity between religious traditions and legal systems in context of the current refugee crisis.  This panel was part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human rights.
        • Kenan Distinguished Lecture with Michael Walzer On April 13th, Michael Walzer (professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, spoke on “What is the Responsibility to Protect? And What Does it Mean in the Syrian Case?” as the 2016 Kenan Distinguished Lecturer. The annual Kenan Distinguished Lecture in Ethics is a signature series of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke that brings a distinguished speaker to campus to address moral issues of broad social and cultural significance.
        • Scholar Symposium in Human Rights, Ethics, and International Politics On April 16th, The Duke Human Rights Center at The Kenan Institute for Ethics hosted its second annual Scholars Research Symposium on Saturday. The symposium, which was sponsored by the Kenan Institute’s Global Human Rights Scholars, provided an opportunity for a select group of seniors at Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill to publicly present honors or capstone projects that broadly relate to the themes of human rights, ethics, or international politics. Discussants included two distinguished Duke alumni, Tosin Agbabiaka and Menaka Nayar. Seniors included Griffin Creech, Bradford Ellison, Meaghan Kachadoorian, Iris Kim, Christie Lawrence, and Imari Smith.
        • Roundtable Dinner Discussion: The Rising Challenge of Statelessness in Syria After the Arab Spring On April 19th, The Kenan Institute for Ethics co-sponsored with Duke University Middle East Studies Center a roundtable discussion with Amit Sen.
        • Uprooted/Rerouted: Narratives of Refugee Life Stories On April 24th, the six Duke University students enrolled in KIE’s DukeImmerse: Uprooted/Rerouted semester-long program performed dramatic readings of refugee life stories collected during their recent field work in Jordan and the surrounding region. During their month of research, the students conducted interviews with refugees, mostly Syrian. The human stories of refugees attempting to find asylum as told by our students are available to watch on Kenan’s Youtube page.
        • Justice in Energy Policy: How Justice Theorists Can Aid Better Decision-Making about Energy On April 28th, Professor Michael Dworkin  discussed the ways in which classical ‘justice-theorists’ can help resolve the ethical issues of developing and operating energy systems that meet the common statutory standard of being ‘just and reasonable.’ His comments linked both 1) concrete specific scenarios faced by energy regulators with 2) the differing advice that theorists such as Aristotle, Bentham, Mills and Rawls would give for how to resolve those specific decisions. The talk drew on his recent book with Benjamin Sovacool, Global Energy Justice (Cambridge Univ Press 2014).
        • Quantitative Data and Human Rights Conference On May 5th and 6th the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics hosted a conference to review what has been done at the intersection of rights and mathematical modeling, identify technical and political challenges, and develop plans for growing the cadre who work in this field.
        • MSIs, Institutional Design, and Institutional Efficacy On May 26th,The Kenan Institute for Ethics and MSI Integrity co-hosted a one-day workshop, MSIs, Institutional Design, and Institutional Efficacy. The workshop focused on the institutional design of MSIs and explores two sets of questions: First, what institutional design features are emerging as typical for an MSI, what do they do, and to whose benefit? Second, what sort of standardization might be desirable, and what sort should be resisted?

SPEAKERS AND SERIES IN 2015-2016

Conversations in Human Rights. The Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics continues to host an interdisciplinary workshop series, “Conversations in Human Rights.” This workshop series brings together panelists from other institutions with Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The discussions draw together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy and are open to Duke faculty, graduate students, and postdocs. A reception will follow each workshop. Stay tuned for additional for information on additional workshops!

Activities in 2014-2015

2014-MonologuesCOLLABORATIONS 

Bass Connections: Displacement, Resettlement and Global Mental Health Work Group. Kenan Institute for Ethics, Global Health, Asian & Middle Eastern Studies. In an extension of the Kenan Institute for Ethics’ ongoing fieldwork with refugees both abroad and locally (through programs such as DukeImmerse), this working group built on the existing archive of refugee narratives from urban, refugee camp, and resettlement contexts to study how the resettlement process, a global and transnational program where refugees are provided settlement in countries such as the United States, affects the mental health and well-being of refugees. While there are growing bodies of research on pre- and post-displacement, this project looked at resettlement as a global process which has implications for refugee health at different points, from the country of first asylum to the resettlement country. Prior research is augmented by additional fieldwork in Jordan and Lebanon.

Reasonable Accommodations? Minorities in Globalized Nation States. This project was part of an ongoing collaboration led by the Center for European Studies at Duke and seeks to address what a dominant culture’s obligation is to minorities, immigrants, and foreigners in the host countries. The project received supported from a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The Language of Genocide and Human Rights. An interdisciplinary group of faculty and students examined the term “genocide,” which is used in reference to a diverse swath of ethically charged human atrocities, from slavery to microbial disease. With diverse expertise and knowledge of linguistics, history, literature, public policy, political science, and human rights philosophy, this project worked to influence and improve international policy focused on the topic of genocide.This project was a funded jointly by KIE/Bass Connections and Humanities Writ Large.

 

STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES IN 2014-2015

Human Rights Lab. In the spring, Suzanne Katzenstein (Project Director, Duke Human Rights Center at KIE) organized a lab in which students discussed the challenges of human rights advocacy while working in teams on policy projects for a partner human rights NGO. The core goal of the lab model is to provide an opportunity for students to build practical and analytical skills while contributing meaningfully to an important human rights problem. This lab focused on business and human rights, and students worked with international partner organizations with a regional focus in South Asia.

MASTERY. Mentorship, Academics, and Self-esteem: Tutoring and Engaging with Refugee Youth (MASTERY) is a weekly K-12 tutoring program for refugee youth in Durham. This ongoing community partnership, organized by Kenan Institute for Ethics students Cece Mercer and Rosie Nowhitney, pairs Duke undergraduate tutors and refugee students with the goal of providing mentorship, assistance with schoolwork, English tutoring, and a supportive community.

SuWA (Supporting Women’s Action). This community based project worked to empower refugee women in Durham through education and community building. Weekly meetings provided English classes for Arabic speakers, community building events, and focus groups to facilitate cultural expression and mobilize community action.

Student Human Rights Fellows. This new opportunity for thoughtful and innovative undergraduate students with a passion for human rights scholarship and engagement provided a select group of students greater access to resources that support their inquiry into and promotion of human rights issues at Duke and beyond. Fellows selected by application.

Summer Internships. Each summer, DHRC at KIE partners with the UN’s World Food Programme offices in Nepal to offer a Duke student the chance to work with the program on issues of outreach, implementation, and research. Read as 2013 intern Virginia Dillon and 2014 intern Elizabeth Hoyler addressed challenges in international aid generally as well as those specific to the refugee camps in Nepal.

 

WORKSHOPS, CONFERENCES AND EVENTS IN 2014-2015

 

SPEAKERS AND SERIES IN 2014-2015

Conversations in Human Rights. Last fall, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics began hosting a new interdisciplinary workshop series, “Conversations in Human Rights.” This workshop series brings together panelists from other institutions with Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The discussions draw together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy and are open to Duke faculty, graduate students, and postdocs. A reception will follow each workshop. Stay tuned for additional for information on additional workshops!

 

VISITING FELLOW IN HUMAN RIGHTS

This year’s Visiting Fellow in Human Rights is Anne Gallagher AO (BA, LLB, M.Int.L, PhD).  Her visit included meeting with faculty and students, attending seminars, participating in a faculty workshop, and giving a keynote lecture.  She was in residence October 20-21.

Activities in 2013-2014

WORKSHOPS, CONFERENCES AND EVENTS IN 2013-2014

                • DNA, Human Rights and Trafficking. On September 13, the second in a series of workshops on issues surrounding the use of DNA in identification for victims of trafficking was held as part of an ongoing project between DHRC at KIE, the Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy.
                • The Right to Remedy for Trafficked Persons. On October 23, the Center for International & Comparative Law at Duke Law and the Duke Human Rights Center at KIE sponsored a panel on human trafficking from a legal perspective. The panel was moderated by Jayne Huckerby, director of the Duke International Human Rights Clinic, and panelists included Joy Ezeilo, UN Special Rapporteur on trafficking in persons; Alison Kiehl Friedman,  Deputy Director of the U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons; and Lindsey Roberson, Assistant District Attorney at Office of the District Attorney New Hanover County.
                • The Icon Industry: The Visual Economy of Human Rights. On November 4, in concurrence with the opening of an exhibition curated by 2013-2014 Kenan Graduate Arts Fellow Caitlin Margaret Kelly, a panel discussion was held on the notion of the iconic image in human rights issues as seen in our news media. The exhibition was on view in the West Duke Building through the month of November.
                • ‘Being Greenlandic’ Exhibit. For the month of February, a photography exhibit was on display in the West Duke Building pertaining to a changing Greenlandic identity and way of life. Through the lens of three photographers–a Greenlander, a Dane, and an American Duke student–images evoked an ethical future for Greenland and how Greenlanders anticipated the mine will affect their life, land, and community.
                • Global Trafficking and Human Rights. On April 14, the first event organized by the Duke Human Rights Center @KIE Student Executive Committee was held, bringing two noted experts to campus: Mark Lagon, former Ambassador at the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the US Department of State, and Louise Shelley, founder and director of the Terrorism, Transnational Crime, and Corruption Center at George Mason University. During a panel and Q&A session, they discussed the causes and consequences of human trafficking globally and locally and what policy strategies could best combat this problem.

 

SPEAKERS AND SERIES IN 2013-2014

Conversations in Human Rights. Beginning in fall 2013, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics hosted a new interdisciplinary workshop series, “Conversations in Human Rights.” This workshop series met twice each semester, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. A discussion-focused series drawing together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy, these workshops were open to Duke faculty, graduate students, and postdocs. A reception followed each workshop.

                • Religious Freedom and Persecution. September 24, 2013.  Panelists: Carolyn Warner (Arizona State University), Anthony Gill (University of Washington); Discussant/Moderator: Michael Gillespie (Duke University)
                • Economic Sanctions and Human Rights. October 2013. Panelists: Dursun Peksen (Political Science, University of Memphis), Adam Smith (International lawyer, Washington, D.C.); Discussant/Moderator: Suzanne Katzenstein (Duke Law School)
                • Statelessness & the Quest for Citizenship in the Dominican Republic. November, 2013. Panelists: Rosario Espinal (Sociology, Temple University), Nassef Perdomo, (Constitutional lawyer, Dominican Republic); Moderator: Michaeline Crichlow (AAAS/Sociology, Duke University); Discussant: Deborah Jenson, (Romance Studies/Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Duke University).
                • Environmental Justice & Human Rights, January 2014. Panelists: Amity Doolittle (Forestry and Environmental Science, Yale University), Shangrila Joshi, (Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University). Moderator:  Deborah Gallagher (Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University).

 

VISITING FELLOW IN HUMAN RIGHTS

Philosopher and Director of the Global Justice Program (Yale University), Thomas Pogge was the 2013-2014 Visiting Fellow in Human Rights. His visit included talks with graduate students and a public lecture on March 31.

Activities in 2012-2013


Collaborations in 2012-2013

                • Collaboration with the UN Working Group on business and human rights. Brianna Nofil, the Stephen and Janet Bear Post-Graduate Fellow in Business, Law and Human Rights, provided research to support the five members of the UN Working Group. Brianna traveled to Mongolia for one of the working group’s country missions examining mineral rights.
                • Collaboration with Paul Quinn College, a historically black college/university (HBCU) in Dallas, led by Deb Gallagher. With the Nicholas School for the Environment, the Kenan Institute began work with college officials in Dallas to study the relationship between HBCUs and locally undesirable land uses, participate in a student exchange to create social capital and promote environmental justice, and examine public policies to support sustainable development.
                • Collaboration on Statelessness with the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. Through March 2013, the photography exhibit by Greg Constantine, Nowhere People: The Face of Global Statelessness, was on display at the Kenan Institute. The exhibit, organized by student Christine Delp, opened on November 1 with a panel discussion on the Ethics of Photography for Social Change. The panel, which included photographer Greg Constantine, Pediatrician John Moses, and UNHCR Communications Director Charity Tooz, was be moderated by Tom Rankin.

2012-2013 Workshops and Conferences

Speakers and Series in 2012-2013

Activities in 2014-2015

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