Jan 172017
 
 January 17, 2017

Conv.HR_-300x225During the 2016 election, Donald Trump routinely highlighted the economic suffering faced by American workers, critiquing deinstrialization and arguing that trade agreements played a major role in the loss of American manufacturing jobs. Despite this, he has not indicated any interest in making trade agreements fairer by raising labor standards in foreign countries, as critics of international trade agreements, as well as some human rights proponents, have advocated.

What kinds of changes can we expect to the governance of labor, both domestically and in international agreements under the Trump administration? Can we expect anything more than a new era of repression, or does Trump’s rejection of multinational trade agreements also present opportunities for either labor or human rights advocates? What strategies might working people, particularly those on the margins in the U.S. and elsewhere, employ to challenge repressive conditions they face at work given the rise of the anti-regulatory Right? What new regimes of governance might emerge?

Join us on February 23rd for a discussion of these questions. Panelists include:

  • Cynthia Estlund (NYU Law School, Catherine A. Rein Professor of Law)
  • Kevin Kolben (Rutgers Business School, Investigative Journalist)
  • Moderated by Peter Pihos (Duke Thomspon Writing Program, Lecturing Fellow)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

The event will be held on Thursday, February 23 2017 at 4:30-6:00pm, located in West Duke, Room 101 (Ahmadieh Family Conference Room).

Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth by Thursday, February 20th at noon.

Jan 162017
 
 January 16, 2017

With regular reports of police killings of unarmed citizens, the issue of police misconduct is now on the national agenda.  Jamie Kalven is an investigative journalist and human rights activist who has reported extensively on patterns of police abuse and impunity in Chicago.  It was Mr. Kalven who brought the police killing of Laquan McDonald to public attention.  Most recently, he has published a compelling account of the operations of the code of silence in the Chicago Police Department.

Mr. Kalven’s work became the focus of a protracted legal controversy in 2005-2006, when he refused to comply with a subpoena demanding his notes. A series of legal actions eventually established that documents bearing on allegations of police misconduct are public information. Civil rights lawyers have hailed the ruling as “historic” and a “watershed.”

Jamie Kalven will be the Kenan Practitioner in Residence with the Cover-ups and Exposes project at KIE.  His public lecture will address lessons learned about institutional accountability during the turbulent period since the release of the Laquan McDonald video.

Wednesday, Feb 8, 6:00-8:00pm, reception to follow
Rm 103 Gross Hall for Interdisciplinary Innovation
(on the corner of Science Drive and Towerview on Duke’s West Campus)
Parking: Chemistry Gated Lot on corner of Towerview and Circuit Drive (right next to Gross Hall)

Jan 162017
 
 January 16, 2017

Conv.HROver the course of a decade, a team of Chicago police officers, involved in the illicit drug trade, framed individuals who did not cooperate with them by planting drugs on them. Investigative Reporter Jamie Kalven recently exposed the story, and has worked this past year with the Exoneration Project to secure the release of two of the individuals who were framed. As Joshua Tepfer, one of the leads on the Exoneration Project put it, this is just “the tip of the iceberg.”

In 2011 Brandon Bethea died in a Harnett Country jail after being shot by a detention officer with a Taser. The killing was caught on videotape but no one was ever charged. Four years later, a Harnett county deputy police officer, with no search or arrest warrant, shot and killed John Livingston in his house. In the prior two years, that police officer had committed more arrests on the charge of resisting a police officer than any other deputy in the department. Recently, five North Carolina Sheriffs determined that there was no probable cause to revoke or suspend his certification. In her four-part series for the News and Observer, “Deadly Force,”
Investigative Journalist Mandy Locked exposed Bethea’s death and covered extensively the police squads of Harnett Country.

Join us on February 7th for a conversation with Jamie Kalven and Mandy Locke on police killings and abuses as well as the structures of silence and accountability that sustain or expose them.

This event is co-sponsored by the Duke Law School’s Innocence Project. Panelists include:

Jamie Kalven (Journalist and Founder and Executive Director of the Invisible Institute)
• Mandy Locke (News and Observer, Investigative Journalist)
• Moderated by James Coleman (Duke Law School, John S. Bradway Professor of the Practice of Law)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.

Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth by Thursday, February 2nd at noon.

Police Abuse and Impunity: Cover-Up or Standard Operating Procedure?
Tuesday, February 7th, 2017, 4:00-5:30 pm
Duke Law School, Room 3037

Sep 272015
 
 September 27, 2015

cooking-refugeesAs part of the Food, Ethics, and Culture series this spring, Duke undergraduates will have the opportunity to cook together with locally resettled refugees, learning more about the food of their homelands and the role food plays in their cultural traditions. The class will be held at Durham Spirits Company, a historical house that has a professional kitchen.  The class will be modeled after the cooking classes held by Project Feast, with four to five resettled refugees demonstrating 4-5 traditional dishes.  Participants will introduce themselves and then assist with the prep work of washing, chopping, etc.

Enjoy this unique opportunity to work hands-on with resettled refugee women, share a meal with them, and take the recipes home!

Space is limited and sign-up using the online form is required. Transportation will be provided from campus to the Durham Spirits Company.

 

Sep 242015
 
 September 24, 2015

Harpham-400This Event Has Been Postponed Due to the Weather Forecast. New Date and Time TBA; Stay Tuned Here.

Join Geoffrey Harpham (Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and former president and director of the National Humanities Center) and Dan Ariely (Senior Fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and James B. Duke Professor of Psychology & Behavioral Economics at Duke) for a conversation on an “American” system of education that emerged at the end of the second World War.  This system–universal, general, and liberal–grew out of a national self-understanding, and was designed with the needs of a democratic society, rather than the professions or the civil service, in mind.  Central to this system was the project of training and disciplining the mighty force of opinion, which de Tocqueville identified as the “mistress of the world” in American society.

This event is part of the “Humanities Futures: Academic Futurology” series hosted by the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute at Duke University. It is co-sponsored by the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 4:00pm-6:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Lecture Room (FHI Garage) – C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse

Sep 242015
 
 September 24, 2015

EFS-BlackGoldThis film traces the tangled trail from the two billion cups of coffee consumed each day back to the coffee farmers who produce the beans. This year’s Ethics Film Series connects with a series of programming at the Institute focused on food, culture and ethics. The four films and one documentary series chosen reflect different ways in which visual narratives can help unearth the ways in which preparing and eating food brings us closer to one another.

Join us for a coffee flavor and brewing demonstration with Counter Culture Coffee at 6:30pm in the lobby of Griffith Theater!

The screening will begin at 7:00pm in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center. Stay after for a Q&A with Counter Culture’s Timothy Hill (head of coffee) and Meredith Taylor (sustainability manager), joined by  Claire Fox,  a Master of Forestry and Environment Management student at the Nicholas School of the Environment. Fox has worked on resiliency and issues facing smallholder coffee farmers as they adapt to climate change in partnership with Counter Culture.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

Presented with Duke’s Screen/Society, the Center for Documentary Studies, Artstigators, and the Arts of the Moving Image Program. This screening is co-sponsored by Ethiopian Community Organization of North Carolina.

Sep 172015
 
 September 17, 2015

Instagram ContestThis year’s annual ‘What is Good Art’ competition and exhibition ties into a larger programming initiative at the Institute this spring on the theme of Ethics, Food, & Culture. Come see selected artworks submitted by students from all over the university that address this topic in new and interesting ways, as well as find out which works were selected by a panel of professionals for our prizes (and vote for viewer’s choice!).

  • First Prize: $500
  • Second Prize: $300
  • Third Prize: $100
  • Gallery Choice Prize: $100

Wednesday, February 17
5:30-7:00pm
Keohane Kenan Gallery (First floor of the West Duke Building, East Campus)

Sep 152015
 
 September 15, 2015

NOTE: This talk was originally scheduled for Monday, February 15.

The Center for Strategic Philanthropy and Civil Society, DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, and Kenan Institute for Ethics are hosting Steve Weisman for a talk on his new book The Great Tradeoff: Confronting Moral Conflicts in the Era of Globalization. Weisman is vice president for publications and communications at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He previously served as the chief international economics correspondent of the New York Times and as a member of the editorial board, specializing in politics and economics. During the first term of President Ronald Reagan, Mr. Weisman was senior White House correspondent, specializing in foreign policy, budget, tax, and other economic issues.

His latest book addresses the worldwide economic crises over the past several years, which have blasted livelihoods, inspired protests, toppled governments, and highlighted profound moral concerns surrounding globalization.

Please R.S.V.P. to katie.oconnor@duke.edu.

Could Globalization Be Moral After All?
Tuesday, February 16, 4:00pm-6:00pm
Sanford School Room 201
Book signing and reception to follow

 

Sep 102015
 
 September 10, 2015

EFS-Wall-EIn the distant future, a small waste-collecting robot inadvertently embarks on a space journey that will ultimately decide the fate of mankind. This year’s Ethics Film Series connects with a series of programming at the Institute focused on food, culture and ethics. The four films and one documentary series chosen reflect different ways in which visual narratives can help unearth the ways in which preparing and eating food brings us closer to one another.

The screening will begin at 7:00pm in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with KIE’s Dirk Philipsen and Kaitlin Henderson, a graduate student in Duke’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

Presented with Duke’s Screen/Society, the Center for Documentary Studies, Artstigators, and the Arts of the Moving Image Program

Sep 012015
 
 September 1, 2015

Father Greg BoyleUndergraduates, join us for a Do Lunch event with Father Greg Boyle. Familiarly known as “Father G,” he will be a visiting Kenan Practitioner in Residence with Religions and Public Life at KIE. Fr. Boyle is Executive Director of Homeboy Industries, the largest and most successful gang intervention, rehabilitation and re-entry program in the world, operating in Los Angeles, CA. In 1988, members of the Dolores Mission Church and Father G found a few caring business owners willing to hire former gang members, and “Jobs for a Future” was created. Thousands of young people have since walked through the doors of Homeboy Industries looking for a second chance, and finding community.

Lunch will take place in the Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101 West Duke Building) from noon to 1pm. Catered lunch will be available to students who RSVP – space is limited.

WHAT: Do Lunch with Father Greg Boyle, Executive Director of the Los Angeles-based nonprofit Homeboy Industries
WHEN: Monday, February 1, from noon to 1pm
WHERE: West Duke 107F, East Campus
RSVP: Click here to RSVP.