Sep 272015
 
 September 27, 2015

cooking-refugeesAs part of the Food, Ethics, and Culture series this spring, Duke undergraduates will have the opportunity to cook together with locally resettled refugees, learning more about the food of their homelands and the role food plays in their cultural traditions. The class will be held at Durham Spirits Company, a historical house that has a professional kitchen.  The class will be modeled after the cooking classes held by Project Feast, with four to five resettled refugees demonstrating 4-5 traditional dishes.  Participants will introduce themselves and then assist with the prep work of washing, chopping, etc.

Enjoy this unique opportunity to work hands-on with resettled refugee women, share a meal with them, and take the recipes home!

Space is limited and sign-up using the online form is required. Transportation will be provided from campus to the Durham Spirits Company.

 

Sep 242015
 
 September 24, 2015

EFS-BlackGoldThis film traces the tangled trail from the two billion cups of coffee consumed each day back to the coffee farmers who produce the beans. This year’s Ethics Film Series connects with a series of programming at the Institute focused on food, culture and ethics. The four films and one documentary series chosen reflect different ways in which visual narratives can help unearth the ways in which preparing and eating food brings us closer to one another.

The screening will begin at 7:00pm in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center. We’ll be joined by representatives from Counter Culture Coffee for a Q&A on coffee sustainability, and there may be a coffee cupping – stay tuned for details!

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

Presented with Duke’s Screen/Society, the Center for Documentary Studies, Artstigators, and the Arts of the Moving Image Program

Sep 232015
 
 September 23, 2015

2016Reg-GraphicPlease join the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics for a lunch seminar on Tuesday, February 23. Betsy Albright, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Environmental Science and Policy Methods, will be presenting. Albright’s current research centers on how policies and decisions are made in response to extreme climatic events. She is also interested in collaborative decision making processes, particularly in the realm of water resource management.

RSVP to Amber Diaz Pearson (amber.diaz@duke.edu) by 5:00PM Thursday, February 18, for lunch.

Tuesday, February 23
11:30am-1:00pm
Gross Hall 105 (West Campus)

Parking: Closest public parking to Gross Hall is in the Bryan Center Parking Garage, Bryan Center Visitor Lot, and Science Drive Visitor Lot.

Sep 182015
 
 September 18, 2015

Conv.HRAppointed by Kofi Annan, Professor Ron Slye served as one of three International Commissioners for the Kenyan Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission between 2009-2013, and has also served as an international consultant to the South African Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission. He will join a panel discussion on February 18th addressing the power and limits of current human rights approaches to confronting mass atrocities in Africa, as well as the possibilities of alternative models. How should we define responsibility for mass violence? What should be the meanings of ‘truth’ and ‘justice’ for societies confronting civil war? The panel will critically engage the role of prosecutions and truth commissions as crucial institutions for helping countries confront, and move beyond, their violent pasts.

Panelists include:

  • Professor Matiangai Sirleaf (University of Pittsburgh School of Law)
  • Professor Ronald Slye (Seattle University School of Law & Former International Commissioner for the Kenyan Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission and international consultant to South African Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission)
  • Moderated by Professor Michael Struett (NC State University, Political Science)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy. This panel is co-sponsored by Duke Islamic Studies Center and Duke Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic and the Center for International and Comparative Law.

Please RSVP to Daniel Baroff [daniel.baroff@duke.edu] by Monday, February 15th at noon.

Debating Trials and Truth Commissions: Responding to Violence in Africa
Thursday, February 18th, 4:30-6:00
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101 West Duke)
Reception to follow

Sep 172015
 
 September 17, 2015

Instagram ContestThis year’s annual ‘What is Good Art’ competition and exhibition ties into a larger programming initiative at the Institute this spring on the theme of Ethics, Food, & Culture. Come see selected artworks submitted by students from all over the university that address this topic in new and interesting ways, as well as find out which works were selected by a panel of professionals for our prizes (and vote for viewer’s choice!).

  • First Prize: $500
  • Second Prize: $300
  • Third Prize: $100
  • Gallery Choice Prize: $100

Wednesday, February 17
5:30-7:00pm
Keohane Kenan Gallery (First floor of the West Duke Building, East Campus)

Sep 152015
 
 September 15, 2015

The Center for Strategic Philanthropy and Civil Society, DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy, and Kenan Institute for Ethics are hosting Steve Weisman for a talk on his new book The Great Tradeoff: Confronting Moral Conflicts in the Era of Globalization. Weisman is vice president for publications and communications at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He previously served as the chief international economics correspondent of the New York Times and as a member of the editorial board, specializing in politics and economics. During the first term of President Ronald Reagan, Mr. Weisman was senior White House correspondent, specializing in foreign policy, budget, tax, and other economic issues.

His latest book addresses the worldwide economic crises over the past several years, which have blasted livelihoods, inspired protests, toppled governments, and highlighted profound moral concerns surrounding globalization.

Please R.S.V.P. to katie.oconnor@duke.edu.

Could Globalization Be Moral After All?
Monday, February 15, 4:00pm-6:00pm
Sanford School Room 201
Book signing and reception to follow

 

Sep 122015
 
 September 12, 2015

Jewish-Inst-&-InnovationsThis symposium, part of the North Carolina Jewish Studies Seminar, will feature John Connelly (UC Berkeley) presenting on “From Enemies to Brothers? Catholic Jewish Relations since WWII” and Christian Wiese (Goethe University Frankfurt am Main) on “A Dialogue Overshadowed by a Dark Legacy: The Renewal of Protestant-Christian Relations since the Holocaust.”

This symposiums is sponsored by the Center for Jewish Studies at Duke University, the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Council for European Studies at Duke University, and Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Friday, February 12, 12:00-4:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101 West Duke)

Sep 112015
 
 September 11, 2015

_MG_0517How do storytelling and music shape our experience as fragile creatures subject to loss, suffering, and death?  What do storytelling, music, and the arts in general contribute to how we conceive of the practices of medicine? Come hear Ray Barfield (pediatric oncologist, philosopher, novelist, poet, guitarist) and Jeremy Begbie (theologian, pianist, composer, conductor) discuss these questions–and more. The evening will include live storytelling–and a piano.

Hosted by Religions and Public Life at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, co-sponsored by Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, & the History of Medicine and the Duke Divinity School’s Theology, Medicine, and Culture initiative.

Thursday, February 11, 5:30-7:00pm
Nelson Music Room
Duke East Campus
Free and open to the public; reception to follow.
Parking on Duke’s East Campus is open to any non-parking-permit holders after 5pm.

Sep 102015
 
 September 10, 2015

EFS-Wall-EIn the distant future, a small waste-collecting robot inadvertently embarks on a space journey that will ultimately decide the fate of mankind. This year’s Ethics Film Series connects with a series of programming at the Institute focused on food, culture and ethics. The four films and one documentary series chosen reflect different ways in which visual narratives can help unearth the ways in which preparing and eating food brings us closer to one another.

The screening will begin at 7:00pm in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with KIE’s Dirk Philipsen and Kaitlin Henderson, a graduate student in Duke’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

Presented with Duke’s Screen/Society, the Center for Documentary Studies, Artstigators, and the Arts of the Moving Image Program

Sep 042015
 
 September 4, 2015

Tony Reames (Research Fellow, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan) will present a paper on recent research to the Environmental Justice Working Group. Millions of American households suffer an everyday energy crisis, lacking affordable or reliable energy access to adequately heat their homes. Although energy efficiency is seen as the key site of intervention to address energy affordability problems, we know little about energy efficiency disparities. Using statewide energy consumption data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, this paper develops a model for residential heating energy use intensity in order to predict heating efficiency at the block group level for Kansas City, Missouri. Mapping predictions using GIS reveals variations in the distribution of highly efficient and inefficient block groups. Further analysis demonstrates disparities by race and socioeconomic status that mirror racial and income segregation patterns. The findings of this paper support arguments for targeted, community-based approaches to energy efficiency interventions.

Professor Megan Mullin (Duke, Nicholas School of the Environment) will serve as a discussant.

Co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

Parking instructions and the paper will be sent to those who RSVP; please RSVP to Kay Jowers (kay.jowers@duke.edu) by Monday, February 1st.

A Spatial Understanding of Energy Inequality in Urban America
Thursday, Feb. 4th, 3:30-5:00 pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101 West Duke)