Oct 312014
 
 October 31, 2014

brainThis symposium is part of the KIE/Bass Connections project “Moral Judgments About and By Stimulant Users.” The symposium will explore the biological and pharmacological effects of stimulants together with policy and ethical issues around their use. Guest speakers will include:

  • Edythe London (Professor, Departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, and Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA)
  • Nicole Vincent (Associate Professor,  Philosophy, Georgia State)

There will also be a panel featuring the research of the student members of the research team. More details will be posted here.

 

Oct 252014
 
 October 25, 2014

once-cropped-still filterOnce (dir. John Carney, 2006) is about a vacuum repairman (Glen Hansard) who moonlights as a street musician and hopes for his big break. One day a Czech immigrant (Marketa Irglova), who earns a living selling flowers, approaches him with the news that she is also an aspiring singer-songwriter. The pair decide to collaborate, and the songs that they compose reflect the story of their blossoming love.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.

Oct 252014
 
 October 25, 2014

Global-Regulation-HumanRightsThis workshop is jointly sponsored by Rethinking Regulation at KIE and the Duke Human Rights Center at KIE. It will feature papers presented by Lamb Fellow in Regulatory Governance Jennifer Miller, KIE Graduate Fellow Shana Starobin, and other scholars of regulatory and human rights issues.

Friday, March 20
11:30-5:00PM
101 West Duke Building

Updates will be posted here; for more information contact amber.diaz@duke.edu.

Oct 252014
 
 October 25, 2014

Punk-singer filterThe Punk Singer (dir. Sini Anderson, 2013) is about Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre, and how she rose to national attention as the reluctant but never shy voice of the riot grrrl movement. She became one of the most famously outspoken feminist icons, a cultural lightning rod. Her critics wished she would just shut-up, and her fans hoped she never would. So in 2005, when Hanna stopped shouting, many wondered why. Through 20 years of archival footage* and intimate interviews with Hanna, THE PUNK SINGER takes viewers on a fascinating tour of contemporary music and offers a never-before-seen view into the life of this fearless leader.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.

Oct 192014
 
 October 19, 2014

jamison-leslieNew York Times Best-selling author Leslie Jamison will give a public talk as part of a new visiting writers series organized by The Kenan Institute for Ethics and the Center for Documentary Studies.

In the best-selling collection of essays The Empathy Exams, Jamison begins with her experience as a medical actor, paid to act out symptoms for medical students to diagnose. Jamison’s visceral and revealing essays ask essential questions about our basic understanding of others: How should we care about one another? How can we feel another’s pain, especially when pain can be assumed, distorted, or performed? Is empathy a tool by which to test or even grade each other? By confronting pain—real and imagined, her own and others’—Jamison uncovers a personal and cultural urgency to feel. She draws from her own experiences of illness and bodily injury to engage in an exploration that extends far beyond her life, spanning wide-ranging territory—from poverty tourism to phantom diseases, street violence to reality television, illness to incarceration—in its search for a kind of sight shaped by humility and grace. The Empathy Exams is a brilliant and forceful book by one of this country’s vital young writers.

Copies of The Empathy Exams will be available for sale and a brief signing session will follow the talk.

Co-sponsors for this event include Duke’s Arts & HealthBaldwin Scholars ProgramDeWitt Wallance Center for Media & Democracy at Sanford School of Public Policy, English DepartmentForum for Scholars & PublicsFranklin Humanities InstituteProgram in Women’s Studies, and Thompson Writing Program.

Wednesday, March 18, 7 p.m.
Nelson Music Room, East Duke Building
Free and open to the public
Reception to follow
Parking in all East Campus lots and along Campus Drive is free after 5:00pm

Jamison’s visit will also include a Team Kenan Do Lunch with undergraduates (March 18), a staff book club visit, and a panel discussion at the Forum for Scholars and Publics (both March 19) with Duke senior and photographer Lauren Henschel, whose documentary work explores representations of pain.

Oct 162014
 
 October 16, 2014

HP14.15FlyerPart of the 2014-2015 Health Policy Lecture Series hosted by the Duke University Hospital Office of Graduate Medical Education in partnership with Duke Clinical Research Institutes, Kenan Institute for Ethics, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University School of Medicine, and Duke University School of Law.

This series is intended to promote exposure to timely and critical health policy topics and promote interactions and collaboration among students and faculty across Duke University schools. All students, faculty, and trainees are invited to participate.

2014 Elections & Healthcare: An After Action Assessment, March 2, 6:00-8:00pm
Trent Semans Center for Health Education – Great Hall (Level 0)

Panel Presenters:
Jonathan Oberlander, PhD (Professor and Vice Chair of Social Medicine and Health Policy & Management at UNC-Chapel Hill)
Glen Bolger (Co-Founder, Public Opinion Strategies Pollster, Republican party)
Bill Gradison, MBA, DCS (Fuqua Adjunct Faculty, Former US Congressman, Member of Medicare Payment Advisory Committee)

Moderated by:
Mac McCorkle, JD (Associate Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Director of Graduate Studies, Master of Public Policy Program)

Oct 152014
 
 October 15, 2014

Laws that Learn lunch seminar, “Adaptive Regulation of Pharmaceuticals.” Professor Kenneth Oye (MIT) and Professor Arti Rai (Duke) will discuss the challenges and opportunities in shifting the way the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and its counterparts around the world, regulate pharmaceutical products. Can and should we move from a one-time decision to approve a drug in general, to a sequential process of partial approvals with continued monitoring and learning over time? How can our regulatory systems incorporate continued learning, as new technologies and their impacts emerge?

This event is one in the “Laws that Learn” seminar series, co-sponsored by the Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law, the Rethinking Regulation Program at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, and the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions at Duke.

Friday, February 27
1:00-3:00PM
Law 4055

Lunch provided with RSVP.

Oct 142014
 
 October 14, 2014

jon-favreauWords Matter: Storytelling with President Obama in an Age of Sound Bites
5:30-7:00PM, Fleishman Commons,
Sanford School of Public Policy
This Talk is Free & Open to the Public
Reception to follow

The significance of meaningful and effective words cannot be overrated, especially when a critical message is needed to stand out in a 24/7 news cycle and break through the constant noise of social media.  Jon Favreau—director of speechwriting for President Barack Obama (2009-2013)—knows this all too well.

According to Obama chief advisor David Axelrod, he has had his “stamp on all the great speeches from 2005 to early 2013” and always sought to tell a compelling story rather than string together a collection of sound bites. Favreau will discuss the ability to “see” or get behind the words—to capture the essence of an issue and create dialogue that clearly and powerfully articulates what it is about that issue that matters and why we should care. Favreau will offer his insight on how precisely—from conception to delivery—to “get behind the words we speak,” including the significance of “mining” resources for inspiration, creating scripts that speak from and to the heart, and “walking the walk” of talk.

Public parking is available in the Science Drive Visitor Lot and the Bryan Center Lot and Deck.

This visit is jointly presented by the KIE Practitioner in Residence Program and the Humanities Writ Large Network on Democracy and Law: Ancient and Modern. Co-sponsors include the Sanford School of Public Policy and the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy. In addition to the public talk, events during the visit will include:

  • 10:05AM – Workshop with undergraduate students on speechwriting, ethics, and policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy (by invitation)
  • 11:45AM – Team Kenan Do Lunch, West Duke 101 (RSVP information coming soon)
  • 1:25PM – A session with the undergraduate class “Democracy: Ancient and Modern” (open only to students and faculty affiliated with the course)

Contact amber.diaz@duke.edu with questions.

Oct 132014
 
 October 13, 2014

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABuena Vista Social Club (dir. Wim Wenders, 1999) tells the story of aging Cuban musicians whose talents had been virtually forgotten following Castro’s takeover of Cuba and how they are brought out of retirement by Ry Cooder, who travelled to Havana in order to bring the musicians together. The collaboration results in triumphant performances of extraordinary music, and resurrecting the musicians’ careers.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.