Nov 212014
 
 November 21, 2014

jon-favreauThis residency was previously scheduled for February 26.

Words Matter: Storytelling with President Obama in an Age of Sound Bites
5:30-7:00PM, Fleishman Commons,
Sanford School of Public Policy
This Talk is Free & Open to the Public
Reception to follow

The significance of meaningful and effective words cannot be overrated, especially when a critical message is needed to stand out in a 24/7 news cycle and break through the constant noise of social media.  Jon Favreau—director of speechwriting for President Barack Obama (2009-2013)—knows this all too well.

According to Obama chief advisor David Axelrod, he has had his “stamp on all the great speeches from 2005 to early 2013” and always sought to tell a compelling story rather than string together a collection of sound bites. Favreau will discuss the ability to “see” or get behind the words—to capture the essence of an issue and create dialogue that clearly and powerfully articulates what it is about that issue that matters and why we should care. Favreau will offer his insight on how precisely—from conception to delivery—to “get behind the words we speak,” including the significance of “mining” resources for inspiration, creating scripts that speak from and to the heart, and “walking the walk” of talk.

Public parking is available in the Science Drive Visitor Lot and the Bryan Center Lot and Deck.

This visit is jointly presented by the KIE Practitioner in Residence Program and the Humanities Writ Large Network on Democracy and Law: Ancient and Modern. Co-sponsors include the Sanford School of Public Policy and the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and DemocracyStay tuned for information on other events as part of his residency, including:

  • Workshop with undergraduate students on speechwriting, ethics, and policy at the Sanford School of Public Policy (by invitation)
  • Team Kenan Do Lunch
  • A session with the undergraduate class “Democracy: Ancient and Modern” (open only to students and faculty affiliated with the course)

Contact amber.diaz@duke.edu with questions.

Nov 182014
 
 November 18, 2014

Scholars-SymposiumThe Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University is calling for submissions to its first annual Scholars Symposium. The symposium, which is sponsored by the DHRC at KIE Human Rights Fellows, will provide the opportunity for seniors at Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill to publicly present honors or capstone projects that broadly relate to the themes of human rights, ethics, or international politics. Distinguished faculty and alumni, as well as current students, will be invited to serve as discussants. This event is open to both Duke and UNC faculty, students and alumni.

Saturday, April 18th  
1:00-3:30
West Duke Building, Room 101, Duke University. 
Reception to follow

Submission information:

  • Projects can be written or artistic works. Students will present short summaries of their work in a conference-style setting.
  • Acceptance into the symposium is competitive. Applicants are asked to submit a 2-3 page extended abstract of their project. Please include the project’s 1) motivating research questions, 2) methods, 3) conclusion, and 4) overall significance to human rights, ethics, or international politics.
  • Applications are due Wednesday, April 1st at 5:00pm to Wendi Jiang, wendi.jiang@duke.edu. For any questions regarding the symposium or submission requirements, please contact Suzanne Katzenstein, suzanne.katzenstein@duke.edu.

 

Nov 172014
 
 November 17, 2014
cropped-394989_10102516289856830_1790556150_n1-2What can the past tell us about the present? This question, once the bedrock of historical enquiry, faded from the academic imagination after the post-structural turn. As utilitarian and deterministic understandings of the past came under attack for ossifying ‘traditions’, a new periodization took shape–now familiar to anthropologists and historians alike–of a post-colonial present separated from its ‘authentic’ past by the unbridgeable gulf of European imperialism and colonial modernity. The workshop aims to probe the limits of this approach by bringing together anthropologists and historians interested in exploring the manifold relationships various pasts have with the present day world. The workshop will focus on Muslim societies as the primary context to conceptualize the interplay between historical inquiry and analysis of emergent social forms.

 

For call for papers, speakers, and other information, visit the workshop website. The workshop is sponsored by Duke Cultural Anthropology, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Franklin Humanities InstituteDuke Islamic Studies, Duke Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, and Duke History Department.
Nov 172014
 
 November 17, 2014

LSGSThis workshop maps the broad conceptual parameters of Central American-American Studies and explores them through history, cultural and literary studies, and humanistic social sciences, as well as interdisciplinary frameworks. Engaging with this transnational U.S. population, Subjects of and for Central American-American Studies aims to proceed with the critical baton of academic conversation started after the historic 2012 Teresa Lozano Long conference at The University of Texas at Austin on “Central Americans and the Latino/a Landscape: New Configurations of Latina/o America” and the summer 2013 special issue of Latino Studies on “U.S. Central Americans: Representations, Agency and Communities.” Questions to be worked through include: what is “Central American-American” (and the very language that names it), how is it brought into view, what is its past and future, how is it dialoguing with Latino/a Studies, and are there new geographic sites and analytic nests of possibilities?

Organized by Duke Program in Latino/a Studies in the Global South and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Participants
ARTURO ARIAS The University of Texas at Austin
MARITZA CARDENAS The University of Arizona
EDUARDO CONTRERAS Hunter College
CARY CORDOVA The University of Texas at Austin
KENCY CORNEJO The University of New Mexico
ÓSCAR MARTÍNEZ Journalist at El Faro & author of The Beast (Verso, 2013)
KIRSTEN SILVA GRUESZ University of California at Santa Cruz

Nov 142014
 
 November 14, 2014

Punk-singer filterThe Punk Singer (dir. Sini Anderson, 2013) is about Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre, and how she rose to national attention as the reluctant but never shy voice of the riot grrrl movement. She became one of the most famously outspoken feminist icons, a cultural lightning rod. Her critics wished she would just shut-up, and her fans hoped she never would. So in 2005, when Hanna stopped shouting, many wondered why. Through 20 years of archival footage* and intimate interviews with Hanna, THE PUNK SINGER takes viewers on a fascinating tour of contemporary music and offers a never-before-seen view into the life of this fearless leader.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.

Oct 312014
 
 October 31, 2014

brainCan drugs help us think better and achieve more? If so, should they be banned or required? This interdisciplinary conference addresses the neurobiological, psychological, philosophical, and legal implications of using stimulant drugs as cognitive enhancers, as treatment for ADHD or narcolepsy, or for recreation. The speakers, who will include both prominent experts and Duke students, will also consider potential health risks and ethical issues raised by cognitive enhancement. The final panel of students, faculty, and administrators will focus on the unique Duke Community Standard, which classifies non-prescribed use of cognitive enhancers as a form of cheating.

This symposium is part of the KIE/Bass Connections project “Moral Judgments About and By Stimulant Users.” It is sponsored by Bass Connections: Brain & Society, the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences Center on Addiction & Behavior Change, and the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Please register via our online form.

Tuesday, March 31
Von Canon Hall, Bryan Center, Duke West Campus
9:30am-4:30pm (Full schedule below)

Schedule

9:30: Introduction
9:45-10:30: Edythe London, “Dopamine, Self-Control and Decision-Making: Alteration by Stimulant Abuse”
10:45-11:30: John Looney, “A Tale of Two Cultures: Stimulent Abuse in Rural Appalachia Contrasted to College Campuses.”
11:30-12:15: Tim Strauman, “Self-Regulation via Stimulant: A Snapshot of College Life”
12:15-1:30: Lunch
1:30-2:15: Nicole Vincent, “Enhancement, Side Effects, and Agency”
2:30-4:00: Panel discussion featuring Nita Farahany, Tom Szigethy, Gary Glass, and Rachel Dew
4:00-4:30 Poster session

Speakers and Panelists

Rachel Dew is Assistant Professor of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University
Nita Farahany is a Professor of Law & Philosophy at Duke University and Director of Duke Science & Society
Gary Glass is Associate Director for Outreach and Developmental Programming at CAPS, Duke University
Edythe D. London is The Thomas and Katherine Pike Professor of Addiction Studies, and Director of the UCLA Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine University of California at Los Angeles
John G. Looney is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University
Timothy J. Strauman is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University
Tom Szigethy is Associate Dean and Director, Duke Student Wellness Center
Nicole Vincent is Associate Professor of Philosophy, Law, and Neuroscience at Georgia State University and is affiliated with the Philosophy Section of TU Delft, the Netherlands

 

Oct 302014
 
 October 30, 2014

This day and a half workshop will examine the contemporary state of development, and the fluid zones of rurality in the world economy through the optic of raciality. It will cover notably Asia, Africa and the Americas including the U. S. and the Caribbean.  The arguments considered will pivot on heightened risks and multiple states of insecurity being faced given the forces of globalization and environmental change, and the steady decline in the livelihoods of people of color globally, their deepened vulnerabilities, and the complex reconstitution of systemic and lived racialization within this process.

This event is hosted by Duke African & Africa-American Studies and co-sponsored by the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Africa Initiative, Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, Dean of the Humanities, Dean of the Social Sciences, Duke University Center for International Studies, Department of Sociology, Franklin Humanities Institute, Institute of African American Research (UNC Chapel Hill), International Comparative Studies, and the Office of the Provost.

March 26-28, 2015
101 West Duke Building

Schedule will be posted here.

Oct 282014
 
 October 28, 2014

once-cropped-still filterOnce (dir. John Carney, 2006) is about a vacuum repairman (Glen Hansard) who moonlights as a street musician and hopes for his big break. One day a Czech immigrant (Marketa Irglova), who earns a living selling flowers, approaches him with the news that she is also an aspiring singer-songwriter. The pair decide to collaborate, and the songs that they compose reflect the story of their blossoming love.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.

Oct 232014
 
 October 23, 2014

shavar-jeffriesThe Kenan Institute for Ethics is hosting practitioner in residence Shavar Jeffries, a Duke alumnus and partner at the law firm Lowenstein Sandler and civil rights lawyer. He will give a free public talk focusing on the challenges of leading large groups – how do you determine what people want? How do you balance what you think is right with other, often narrow, interests?

Jeffries was previously an associate professor at Seton Hall University School of Law. From 2008 to 2010, he was assistant state attorney under Attorney General Anne Milgram, where he supervised several divisions, including the Division on Civil Rights, the Juvenile Justice Commission and the state’s multi-state litigation and advocacy portfolio. He also recently ran as a mayoral candidate in his native town of Newark, New Jersey.

His residency will also include a Team Kenan Do Lunch discussion with undergraduates about his career path in law, policy, and politics (RSVP link available soon). His visit is co-sponsored by the Hart Leadership Program.​

Ethical Leadership: Self-Sacrifice as Public Service
Monday, March 23, 4:00 p.m.
101 West Duke Building
Reception to follow

Parking will be available in the Gilbert-Addoms lot on East Campus

Please contact amber.diaz@duke.edu for more information.