Apr 142016
 
 April 14, 2016

DAYANI-superJumboA kind of forensic memorial, “Who Is Dayani Cristal?” pieces together the background of a Central American migrant worker who died trying to cross into the United States. Come join us for a free screening of this documentary by Gael Garcia Bernal, sponsored by the Kenan Collaboraty project in Science, Ethics, Identity and Human Rights, the Duke Initiative for Science and Society, the Duke Human Rights Center at the Franklin Humanities Institute, and the Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

This event will be rescheduled for sometime in November – stay tuned!
This event is free and open to the public.

Apr 102016
 
 April 10, 2016

CoverUpsAs part of the Cover-Ups series, join us for a screening of League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis with Paul H Haagen, Duke Professor of Law and Co-Director, Center for Sports Law and Policy.

The National Football League, a multibillion-dollar commercial juggernaut, presides over America’s indisputable national pastime. But the NFL is under assault: thousands of former players have claimed the league tried to cover up how football inflicted long-term brain injuries on many players. What did the NFL know, and when did it know it?

Cover-Ups: Sexual abuse in the priesthood, date rape at universities, concussions among football players – Why do people protect perpetrators and justify silence? The series is hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke and co-sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies, the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media & Democracy, and the Department of Political Science.

Thursday, November 10, 2016
Film screening and discussion will begin at 5:30p.m.,
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (West Duke Building 101)

Apr 032016
 
 April 3, 2016

PeterWehnerThumbCurious about the role of religion and politics in the 2016 presidential election cycle? Interested in becoming a government speechwriter or political commentator? Join a lunchtime conversation with political commentator and former speechwriter Pete Wehner.

Wehner is a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times and a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center who has served in the last three Republican administrations. In 2001, he was named deputy director of speechwriting for President George W. Bush. He later served as director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives, where he reached out to prominent thinkers and advised the White House on a range of domestic and international issues. A senior adviser to Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, he has been affiliated with several leading research organizations. He is a frequent commentator on television and radio and has written widely on political, cultural, religious and national security issues.

Do Lunch is a series of informal lunch discussions featuring ethical leaders outside of Duke and their decision-making processes.

Catered lunch available to students who RSVP; space is limited. Sign-up form coming soon.

Thursday, November 3
1:00-2:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room, West Duke 101

Mar 212016
 
 March 21, 2016

symposiumA symposium exploring Arab and Middle Eastern communities in Latin America—whether Muslim (Sunni, Shia, Druze), Jewish, Christian, or secular—in Brazil, Mexico, Colombia, and Argentina. We chart flows of migration and immigration across time and space, driven by commerce and politics, bringing languages, dialects, religions, and ethnicities into contact and new combinations. We bring together anthropologists, historians, political scientists, literary theorists, art critics, poets, converts, and filmmakers. The symposium looks at the convergences and divergences between two seemingly remote regions and cultures, with attention to allegiances forged across the Global South. We particularly examine the articulation of a radical politics across different political, cultural, and historical contexts: liberation theologies, feminism, decolonization, Marxism, and socialism. We pay special attention to the expression of these ideologies through not just political movements, but also art, music, media, film, literature, and poetry.

Friday, October 21
9:30am-5:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Hall,
240 John Hope Franklin Center

Download the full schedule as a PDF.

SPONSORS: Humanities Futures at the Franklin Humanities Institute, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Duke Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Duke Center for International Studies, Religions and Public Life Initiative at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke Islamic Studies Center, Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The Global Brazil Lab

Mar 202016
 
 March 20, 2016

CoverUpsAs part of the Cover-Ups series, join us for a screening of It Happened Here with Ada Gregory, Executive Director, Office of Interdisciplinary Program Management (former Director, Duke Women’s Center).

Through the intimate portraits of five student survivors, this documentary exposes the alarming pervasiveness of sexual assault on college campuses, the institutional cover-ups and the failure to protect students, and follows their fight for accountability and change on campus and in federal court.

Cover-Ups: Sexual abuse in the priesthood, date rape at universities, concussions among football players – Why do people protect perpetrators and justify silence? The series is hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke and co-sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies, the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media & Democracy, and the Department of Political Science.

Thursday, October 20, 2016
Film screening and discussion will begin at 5:30p.m.,
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (West Duke Building 101)

Feb 292016
 
 February 29, 2016

Conv.HRTransgender people, like other LGBTQ people, are disproportionality represented in the criminal justice system in the United States. Criminalization of LGBTQ lives frequently results in their incarceration, an imprisonment that may have consequences that are uniquely harsh on transgender prisoners.
What special issues are implicated when a transgender person is incarcerated? What role does race play in transgender incarceration? What are some possible solutions to these issues? This panel will examine these and other concerns.

This event is co-sponsored by the The Transgender Studies + Humanities project (funded by FHI Humanities Futures) in the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Program at Duke and by the Gender,Sexuality, and Feminist Studies Program at Duke. 
Panelists include:

  • Paisley Currah (Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Professor of Political Science and Women’s & Gender studies)
  • Asa King (previously Southern Regional Staff Attorney for the Transgender Law Center)
  • Moderated by Ara Wilson (Duke University, Professor of Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies)

This event is part of the on-going discussion series Conversations in Human Rights, bringing together panelists from other institutions and Duke faculty to engage with their research on hot-button international human rights issues. The series draws together the social sciences, humanities, law, and policy.
Please RSVP to Kate Abendroth [kathryn.abendroth@duke.edu] by Monday, September 26th at noon.

Incarcerating Transgender People: An Examination of the Issues
Thursday, September 29, 2016, 4:30-6:00pm
Ahmadieh Family Conference Room (101 West Duke Building)
Reception to follow

Feb 292016
 
 February 29, 2016

HumanTraffickingPosterFINALThis panel will focus on the United States’ anti-trafficking policies both domestically and internationally via diplomatic efforts, and will be presented by Duke Alumni Ambassador-at-Large in the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Person, Susan Coppedge, the Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Homeland Security Advisor on the National Security Council Staff, the Honorable Amy Pope, and MPP/MBA alumna Andrea Wilson.

Co-sponsored by the Sanford School of Public Policy, American Grand Strategy, Duke Law Center for International and Comparative Law, and Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics.

Thursday, September 29, 2016
5:30-6:45pm
Fleishman Commons, Sanford School of Public Policy

Free and open to the public

Feb 262016
 
 February 26, 2016

kdl-macfarquharLarissa MacFarquhar, writer for The New Yorker and author of Strangers Drowning: Grappling with Impossible Idealism, Drastic Choices, and the Overpowering Urge to Help will speak as the 2016-2017 Kenan Distinguished Lecturer on Monday, September 26.

How far do you really go to “do unto others”? Who are the individuals who devote themselves fully to bettering the lives of strangers, even when it comes at great personal cost?

Larissa MacFarquhar has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1998. Her subjects have included John Ashbery, Barack Obama, and Noam Chomsky, among many others. Previously she was a senior editor at Lingua Franca and an advisory editor at The Paris Review. MacFarquhar lives in New York.

The annual Kenan Lecture brings a distinguished speaker to campus to address moral issues of broad social and cultural significance.

Monday, September 26, 2016
Begins 5:30pm; reception to follow
Nasher Museum of Art Auditorium

This event is free and open to the public. No ticket is required; seating is first-come, first-served. Free parking is available in the Nasher Museum Parking Lot.

Feb 252016
 
 February 25, 2016

Spotlight_withKenan[1]-01Join the DeWitt Wallace Center and the Kenan Institute for Ethics for a talk with Matt Caroll, investigative reporter and member of the Spotlight team.

Film Screening at 6:00 pm on September 25th in Rubenstein Hall 153.
Talk at 5:30 pm on Sept 28th in the Rhodes Conference Room, Sanford.

This talk is part of the Cover-Ups and Exposes Series, which is co-sponsored by the Kenan Institute for Ethics and the DeWitt Wallace Center.

Feb 222016
 
 February 22, 2016

The Kenan Institute for Ethics is once again partnering with Jeff Polish and The Monti to bring live storytelling to Duke’s campus.

Storytellers - Secrets and LiesWhen:
Workshop on Storytelling
September 22, 7:00pm-8:30pm, 101 West Duke, East Campus

Live performances
October 27, 7:00pm, Duke Coffee House, East Campus

What:
Live and Unscripted Stories about “Secrets and Lies”

Who:
Duke Undergraduates, mentored by Jeff Polish and The Monti – Please, RSVP here!

The Monti is non-profit organization that invites people to tell personal stories without the use of notes.  The goal is to create an intimate, open, and fun atmosphere where people can relate their personal experiences to one another through narrative.  Last year students told stories about “Betrayal.” This year we are seeking stories about “Secrets and Lies.”

The Monti has been staging live storytelling events to sold-out crowds throughout the Triangle since 2008. For this event, Duke undergraduates have the chance to work with Jeff Polish to craft a personal story into a compelling piece to perform before a live audience.

We are now seeking storytellers for the October 27 event. For more information and to learn how to tell a good story, come to the workshop on September 22. Coming to the workshop does not commit you to tell a story, but by the end of the evening, you may want to! Everyone is welcome.  You can just show up, but an RSVP here to help us make sure to have enough food!

Hosted by the Kenan Institute for Ethics in partnership with The Monti. Cosponsored by Story Lab at the Franklin Humanities Institute.