Oct 262014
 
 October 26, 2014
cropped-394989_10102516289856830_1790556150_n1-2What can the past tell us about the present? This question, once the bedrock of historical enquiry, faded from the academic imagination after the post-structural turn. As utilitarian and deterministic understandings of the past came under attack for ossifying ‘traditions’, a new periodization took shape–now familiar to anthropologists and historians alike–of a post-colonial present separated from its ‘authentic’ past by the unbridgeable gulf of European imperialism and colonial modernity. The workshop aims to probe the limits of this approach by bringing together anthropologists and historians interested in exploring the manifold relationships various pasts have with the present day world. The workshop will focus on Muslim societies as the primary context to conceptualize the interplay between historical inquiry and analysis of emergent social forms.

 

For call for papers, speakers, and other information, visit the workshop website. The workshop is sponsored by Duke Cultural Anthropology, Duke Human Rights Center at the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Franklin Humanities InstituteDuke Islamic Studies, Duke Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, and Duke History Department.
Oct 252014
 
 October 25, 2014

Punk-singer filterThe Punk Singer (dir. Sini Anderson, 2013) is about Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of the punk band Bikini Kill and dance-punk trio Le Tigre, and how she rose to national attention as the reluctant but never shy voice of the riot grrrl movement. She became one of the most famously outspoken feminist icons, a cultural lightning rod. Her critics wished she would just shut-up, and her fans hoped she never would. So in 2005, when Hanna stopped shouting, many wondered why. Through 20 years of archival footage* and intimate interviews with Hanna, THE PUNK SINGER takes viewers on a fascinating tour of contemporary music and offers a never-before-seen view into the life of this fearless leader.

The film will begin at 7:00pm  in the Griffith Film Theater in Duke University’s Bryan Center, followed by a Q&A session with Duke University faculty.

The screenings are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided.

Parking is available in the Bryan Center Parking Deck. Upon leaving the film, you may receive a voucher to hand to the attendant.

This year’s Ethics Film Series, “Sound Beliefs: Music, Ethics, Identity,” centers on the idea that music can act as a space and as an action at and through which identity is contested, exchanged, and upheld. This year’s four films—which range from a modern-day musical about the love story of a Czech immigrant and an Irishman, to a documentary profile of aging Cuban musicians who find global notoriety — explore the many ways ethics, morals, and personal identity are expressed and shared through music.